Free Arguments for and against drug prohibition Essays and Papers

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    It's Time to Make Drugs Legal for Personal Use Drugs are such a controversy and people have such strong opinions about whether they should be legal or illegal. I don’t have a strong opinion on this topic; I’m easily swayed. For the most part though, I think that they should be legalized because people do it anyways and if they were legal the government could regulate their use and sale more, the government should be receiving the profits of the drug business rather than dealers, marijuana has

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    Criminal Law and The War on Drugs

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    Criminal Law and The War on Drugs "These records of wars, intrigues, factions, and revolutions, are so many collections of experiments, by which the politician or moral philosopher fixes the principles of his science, in the same manner as the physician or natural philosopher becomes acquainted with the nature of plants, minerals, and other external objects, by the experiments which he forms concerning them." (David Hume.)2 "Our long armed and hairy ancestors had no idea of redress beyond

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    Legalize drugs

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    with the prohibition of alcohol in the 1920's. With the illegality of alcohol the mafia could produce liquor and therefore had considerable control over those who wanted their substance and service. The role that the mafia played in the 1920's has transformed into the corner drug dealers and drug cartel of the 1990's. The justification that legalized alcohol under Amendment 21 in 1933 should also legalize drugs in 1996. With the legalization of drugs a decrease in deaths related to drug deals would

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    Wake Up NGO

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    may “wake up!” to bring new reforms to the needed sectors of the society.” INTRODUCTION The global war on drugs has failed. The world wide supply of illicit drugs such as heroin has increased by more than 380 percent in recent decades(UNODC).Despite of the multiple times increase in anti-drug budgets, the global scale of drug market has grown dramatically. The consumption of opiates (drug) has reported to be increased to 17.35million in 2008 as compared to 12.9million in 1998(UNODC).Not only opiates

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    War on Drugs

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    horror stories about drugs like crack-cocaine. From them, and probably from no other source, we learn that crack is immediately addictive in every case, we learn that it causes corruption, crazed violence, and almost always leads to death. The government tells us that we are busy fighting a war on drugs and so it gives us various iconic models to despise and detest : we learn to stereotype inner-city minorities as being of drug-infested wastelands and we learn to "witchhunt" drug users within our own

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    One Half Trillion

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    resorted to what some would argue as archaic means of reducing government spending (sequester). A great problem as the war on drugs is concerned lies in its costs. The Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy uses Colorado as a case study for altering the costs of the nation’s war on drugs. The Journal noted that nearly 18% of Colorado’s prison population is constituted by non-violent drug offenders, which cost about $32,000 per year to be housed in state prisons (Kopel, D. D., & Burrus, T., 2012). This is

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    become aware of drug prohibition. In fact, every country in the world has a form of drugs prohibition. However, national drug prohibition started in 1920s in the United States as a subgroup of national alcohol prohibition. In 1930 the congress of United States separated drugs from the alcohol prohibition law and created a new federal drug prohibition agency (Levine, 2002). Prohibition may be defined as the set of policies which ban all production, distribution and sale of drugs for non-medical use

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    Illegal Drugs: Should they be?

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    honestly claim that current drug policies have been a success. Aside from being ineffective the costly current drug policy of prohibition has created a set of unwanted consequences including; a high prison population of non-violent offenders, corruption, violence, and whole set of health issues. Albert Einstein is quoted as saying, “Insanity: doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results.” and despite the failures of the current policy in deterring drug use that is just what the

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    Legalizing Marijuana

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    Legalizing Marijuana Drugs are a major influential force in our country today. The problem has gotten so out of hand that many options are being considered to control it or even solve it. Ending the drug war seems to be a bit impossible. The war on drugs seems to be accomplishing a lot but this is not true. Different options need to be considered. Legalization is an option that hasn't gotten a chance but should be given one. Although many people feel that legalizing marijuana would increase

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    Countries have been making drugs illegal over the years for varieties of reasons - be it to combat a perceived moral or health epidemic, to single out certain groups of people, or to reflect religious influences. Even when some drugs do not present notable health dangers, governments ban them. While there are many drugs that are unhealthy when abused, the drug policies around the world, particularly the United States, are inconsistent and oppressive. Drug laws were supposedly created for the good

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    Economic Ramifications of the War on Drugs

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    For thousands of years, many drugs, such as marijuana, cocaine, and morphine were manufactured, marketed and consumed legally. It was not until the early 20th century that the notion that the United States could enforce a worldwide prohibition of drugs developed. For four decades, the drug war has become accountable for squandering hundreds of billions of tax dollars (some experts’ figures put estimates in the trillions), mismanaging government spending, and the overwhelming costs to human beings

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    passionate in their positions and provide strong arguments to support their stands. After reviewing all the information, I understand each argument but I feel strongly that it would do our country more good than harm to decriminalize marijuana. Aside from what the government would like you to think, there are actually positive effects that come from the use of marijuana. Perhaps the most popular current controversy dealing with the ongoing war on drugs is legalizing marijuana for medical purposes

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    For thousands of years, many drugs, such as marijuana, cocaine, and morphine were manufactured, marketed and consumed legally. It was not until the early 20th century that the notion that the United States could enforce a worldwide prohibition of drugs developed. For four decades, the drug war has become accountable for squandering hundreds of billions of tax dollars (some experts’ figures put estimates in the trillions), mismanaging government spending, and the overwhelming costs to human beings

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    the most abused drug in America, has had a lot of publicity recently. Marijuana has caused multiple economic problems within the U.S. A controversial question has arisen from the increased popularity and troubles of this drug. The question is whether or not the U.S. government should legalize marijuana possession and sale in the country. Many Americans believe that the drug should be legalized for various reasons; others, however, are against the legalization of the dangerous drug. While legalization

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    The Case Against America’s War on Drugs The legal prohibition on most psychoactive drugs has been in place in this country for the better part of a century. This policy of prohibition, however, has never been based on reason or careful consideration, but on the paranoia of a small segment of society and the indifferent willingness of the majority to accept this vocal minority’s claims without question. Outlawing any use of a particular drug is a violation of the basic freedom of individuals to

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    America's Unjust Drug War

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    The argument over drug reform and the current prohibition has been going on for years. It seems to be an argument between a wise parent and a young teenager, but as generations change more and more of the parents seem to switch sides. While prohibitionists say the mainstream drugs like cocaine, heroin, LSD, and marijuana are harmful and immoral, legalizers argue the opposite (Rachels 223). While they are both valid and interesting arguments the drugs named above still remain illegal. Many organizations

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    Legalize it

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    In this paper I intend to show that the motives for the criminalization of marijuana was not for the public good, but were inspired by bigotry and fear, and potentially for political and monetary gains. This paper will also show that contemporary arguments for the continued criminalization of marijuana are based on skewed studies rather than factual information and that regulation, taxation and responsible use are the solutions to satisfying the demands of both sides of the issue. Finally, this paper

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    Our Right to Drugs

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    Our Right to Drugs You might be tempted to label Thomas Szasz, author of Our Right to Drugs, The Case for a Free Market, a counter-culture hippie. However, this analysis couldn’t be further from the truth. Szasz, a Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry at the State University of New York Health Science Center in Syracuse, is a major supporter of civil liberties. He sees the so-called "War on Drugs" as one of the worst atrocities that the American Government has perpetrated on its people. Szasz

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    The War on Drugs is Failing “Prohibition will work great injury to the cause of temperance… for it goes beyond the bounds of reason in that it attempts to control a man’s appetite by legislation and make a crime out of things that are not a crime. A prohibition law strikes a blow at the very principle upon which our government was founded” Abraham Lincoln On January 16, 1920 the Eighteenth Amendment was ratified by thirty-six states and became part of the Constitution. The intention of

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    John Kovalenko WRTG 2010: Beasley Argument II: “An Unjust War” Few, if any, would argue that drug abuse in the United States is not a serious problem. However, the issue remains how to address it. The current schema of the politicized, militarized "war on drugs" does not appear to be working to reduce drug use in this country. More and more prisons are being built, with increasing numbers of citizens (particularly among minority populations) becoming incarcerated and subsequently trapped in the

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