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    Virtue in John Milton's Comus and Areopagitica The martyred author of Utopia, Sir Thomas More-executed for treason against the king-is credited with the final words, "If I must live in a world in which I cannot act within my conscience, I do not wish to live!" Generations later, the fiery patriotism and explicit candor of Patrick Henry led him to utter the renowned "Give me Liberty or give me death!" Along the same lines of these two men, John Milton's "Areopagitica" argues that the essence of life

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    the opposite occurs: in England of 1643 comes forth the order of the regulation of printing, in which every printed material has to be licensed by the parliament in order to get published. Milton retaliates against this law by writing the tract "Areopagitica", a Greek word whose meaning is 'place of Justice'. This place is what he calls the "commonwealth" -- the public sphere. Consequently, it makes sense to allow limitations in order to uphold justice. However, Milton believes censorship prevents

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    Final Essay

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    This paper supports a grounded reading of John Milton's treatise opposing licensing and censorship in Areopagitica and Stanley Fish's "Driving from the Letter: Truth and Indeterminacy in the Areopagitica," maintaining its status as a foundational document on freedom of the press while acknowledging the contradictions and complexities of Milton's argument. Milton is not only a great author and scholar, but a brilliant political orator who, in a subtle attempt to compliment the members of Parliament

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    The origins of free speech can be traced back to sixteenth century England and the reign of Henry VII.  Due to the ascension of the printing press and the proliferation of ideology contrary to the crown, Henry established laws against seditious libel, the criticism of English government or government officials.  To enforce these laws, Henry created three administrative branches -- privy counsel, stationers company and star chamber.  The privy counsel was in charge of licensing.  In order to publish

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    their works, and John Milton and his Areopagitica are no exception. One of the reasons for this trend in Milton studies and this particular pamphlet can be sought in the over-saturation of Areopagitica criticism dealing, to a great extent, with various aspects of authorial intention and textual authority. This particular strain seems to have been brought to the point of absurdity in Paul M. Dowling's Polite Wisdom: Heathen Rhetoric in Milton's "Areopagitica" (1995), a book from which one can conclude

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    Humanist Writings and English Values

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    Some of the different traditions that exist in humanist works include for example those of Christianity, Egyptian, Greek, and Roman beliefs. Early English writer, John Milton, included references to various different cultures and beliefs in “Areopagitica: A Speech of Mr. John Milton for the Liberty of Unlicensed Printing, to the Parliament of England.” Early on, Milton makes references to the story of Adam and Eve, a biblical story of Life in both Judaism and Christianity. Milton states, “Foolish

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    The Faces Of Freedom

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    people are affected by freedom. In Milton’s Areopagitica he writes against the censorship of literature arguing that people should have the freedom to choose what they want to read. Milton says, “If every action which is good or evil in man at ripe years, were to be under pittance and prescription and compulsions, what were virtue but a name, what praise could be then due to well doing, what gramercy to be sober, just, or continent?” (Areopagitica). Milton’s argument is that man must be free to

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    Goebbels On the "Big Lie" Jewish Virtual Library. . . Web. 03 Nov. 2013. Milton, John. "Quotations about Liberty and Power." Areopagitica . Ed. Sir Richard C. Jebb. . Areopagitica, with a Commentary by Sir Richard C. Jebb and with Supplementary Material . . ed.: Cambridge at the UP, 1918. N. pag. Areopagitica a Speech of Mr John Milton. 15 May . 2006. Web. 03 Nov. 2013. Stern, Guy. "The Burning of the Books in Nazi Germany, 1933: The

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    A Jewish Reading of Milton

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    A Jewish Reading of Milton John Milton produced some of the most memorable Christian texts in English literature. Central pieces of Milton’s work, including Paradise Lost and Samson Agonistes, specifically allude to stories that Judaism and Christianity hold in common. Historically, the anti-monarchical regime Milton supported, under the leadership of Cromwell, informally allowed Jews back into England in 1655 after Edward I exiled them in 1290 (Trepp 151). Additionally, seventeenth-century

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    simply indomitable. He is also empathetic and sensitive, and lacks neither imagination nor resourcefulness. Milton works with the tension created by his character to question the reader’s long standing beliefs of the angel of the bottomless pit. In Areopagitica, Milton had already laid the foundation to this idea: “Good and evil we know in the field of this world grow up together almost inseparably; and the knowledge of good is so involved and interwoven with the knowledge of evil…” (). A character who

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