Free Aphra Behn Essays and Papers

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  • The Rover Analysis

    2475 Words  | 10 Pages

    In Aphra Behn's “The Rover,” characters define relationships as a type of economy where value and use are key. This time period commodified love and sexuality, valuing financial success over meaningful relationships. The dowry system made rich women with a high status most desirable for marriage and their value was increased by their honor. Typical of seventeenth century literature, Behn plays with this ideology as “the language of love in Restoration comedies frequently draws on the language of

  • Comparing Pain in Dr. Faustus and Oroonoko

    1370 Words  | 6 Pages

    Pain in Dr. Faustus and Oroonoko In almost every piece of writing there is reference to some sort of pain, whether it be physical pain or emotional pain. In a story like Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko, the physical pain stands out above any other grief or misery. However, Christopher Marlowe’s Dr. Faustus exhibits just as much pain, but in an emotional sense. This poses an interesting question: Is one pain worse than the other? Can pain be measured? Pain, whether it be physical or emotional, is an

  • Subtle Criticism in Aphra Behn's Oroonoko

    1363 Words  | 6 Pages

    direct forms, through her non-European characters, most often Oroonoko, and through comparisons between cultures and the characters encountered in each. As a female writer trying to earn a living, and as the narrator of the story represented herself, Behn couldn't have the narrator offer too strong a criticism for fear of losing her audience. The narrator is presented as very European. She is very ethnocentric and seems to have no problem with the slave trade, only with the treatment of one specific

  • The Rover Gender Roles Essay

    1681 Words  | 7 Pages

    In Aphra Behn 's The Rover, the gender roles in society are particularly divisive. Gender roles were a major focus throughout the Restoration and especially in this play. The main conflict of the play is the attempt of Helena, Florinda ,and Angellica Bianca to avoid the fate their families have chosen for them.The play comes to the conclusion that there were only two “patriarchal definitions” of women: either that of a virgin or a whore. We see both of these in each of the major female characters

  • Two Views of Slavery

    1012 Words  | 5 Pages

    During the time prior to the twentieth century our world accepted slavery as a normal part of life. Aphra Behn and Phillis Wheatley, both female authors born about 100 years apart, had their own views of slavery and wrote poems and stories about the subject. These women were physically different, Aphra was a Caucasian, and Phillis was an African American, and their lives were rather different as well. Aphra was a spy and playwright, who lived the middle class life and Phillis, was a slave who was taken

  • Aphra Behn's Oroonoko – Slaughter of the Human Spirit

    1157 Words  | 5 Pages

    Oroonoko – Slaughter of the Human Spirit Aphra Behn introduces her characters in Oroonoko as beautiful people who possess a pure, innocent love.  Behn does this in an effort to make her readers feel and question.  Her poetic description of their emotions magnify the horror of the final scene.  Behn's romantic love story is brought to a tragic end through brutality and death.  Why did she choose such an ending?  Her decision to have Oroonoko take the life of his wife and unborn child leaves her

  • Sexual Empowerment of Women in Behn's The Willing Mistress and The Disappointment

    1976 Words  | 8 Pages

    Sexual Empowerment of Women in Behn's The Willing Mistress and The Disappointment "All women together ought to let flowers fall upon the tomb of Aphra Behn, . . . for it was she who earned them the right to speak their minds." (Woolf 91) Born in 1640, Aphra Behn broke gender stereotypes when she undertook a thrilling (if unrewarded) life as a spy for the Crown, but it was her scandalous career as an author which truly achieved many firsts for women. She was the first woman to support hereself

  • Analyzing Gallagher’s Oroonoko’s Blackness

    992 Words  | 4 Pages

    Analyzing Gallagher’s Oroonoko’s Blackness Oroonoko is a fascinating text overflowing with descriptions of complex relations between and within the different races. The attitudes and actions of the Aphra Behn and her characters would make for a rich analysis from any number of behavioral approaches, but there are many more layers to this story than the dominant racial themes. In fact, in "Oroonoko’s Blackness" Catherine Gallagher argues that the main character’s unusually dark skin color actually

  • Women and Sexuality in Aphra Behn's Poems

    1964 Words  | 8 Pages

    Women and Sexuality in Aphra Behn's Poems "All women together ought to let flowers fall upon the tomb of AphraBehn, . . . for it was she who earned them the right to speak their minds." (Woolf 91) Born in 1640, AphraBehn broke gender stereotypes when she undertook a thrilling (if unrewarded) life as a spy for the Crown, but it was her scandalous career as an author which truly achieved many firsts for women. She was the first woman to supporthereself financially by solely

  • Comparison of Characters in Aphra Behn’s The Fair Jilt and Samuel Richardson’s Clarissa

    2419 Words  | 10 Pages

    of Characters in Aphra Behn’s The Fair Jilt and Samuel Richardson’s Clarissa Superficially the characters Clarissa Harlowe and Miranda seem, not only to be extremely different, but complete opposites. Clarissa is an exemplary model of virtue and goodness. Samuel Richardson presents her as a chaste and innocent daughter. She is forced from her duty by a conniving brother into the arms of a manipulative man. She is the victim. Miranda is the villain of The Fair Jilt. Aphra Behn portrays her as