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Free Antipsychotic Essays and Papers

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    Antipsychotics

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    more than positive and negative symptoms, predict a satisfactory functional outcome in terms of full time employment and therefore represent an important target for therapeutic intervention (Green, 1996; Green, 2006). However, current typical antipsychotics generate little if any improvement in cognitive deficits in schizophrenia and therefore novel compounds are needed as indicated by the initiative sponsored by the National Institute of Mental Health called Measurement and Treatment Research to

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    Stimulants may be associated with slower rate of growth when used consistently over a period of several years. Antipsychotics are linked to rapid weight gain, metabolic issues, and endocrine abnormalities. Anti-anxiety medications can be associated with slurred speech as well as memory loss. Even with the serious side effects, doctors still defend the drugs. Margaret

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    Antipsychotic drugs are the new quick fix for mental illness in children, whether right or wrong. Doctors shouldn’t give children antipsychotic drugs at a young age, even though it may be the easy way out of dealing with these children. These drugs will make the victim lifeless and without character for a long time. Such drugs have caused major side effects which caused the child to have long-term issues, which they will face for the rest of their lives. In other words, antipsychotic drugs are gruesome

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    The Effects of Antipsychotic Medications on Schizophrenic Patients Introduction Clinical research trials can be defined as tests of new medications or devices on human participant subjects. Clinical trial sites participate in operations by which they recruit patients that may be eligible in their studies, and conduct such tests on them. I chose to observe patients diagnosed with schizophrenia participating in clinical research trials at the Neuropsychiatric Research Center of Orange County, where

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    Background Weight-gain, which is associated with antipsychotic treatments, is one of the most important concerns in a psychiatric management. Not only it creates self-esteem issues, but it also leads to serious health problems such as cardiovascular diseases or early death.1 As a matter of fact, there are no effective pharmacological treatments to facilitate weight-loss in psychiatric patients. However, there are some current studies showing Metformin can reduce metabolic rate. As a result, it is

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    Atypical or second generation antipsychotics (SGAs) are generally replacing first generation antipsychotics (FGAs) in the treatment of schizophrenia. This report reviews the literature to report on the risk/benefit differences between the two groups. In terms of efficacy the literature is mixed; some studies report that the two groups have similar efficacy across the three main schizophrenic symptoms, or at least no clear advantage with SGAs. Others show that atypicals may have a minor advantage

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    The film also addresses the treatment of schizophrenia through John Nash’s experiences. Nash most likely took antipsychotic drugs, which reduce the symptoms of psychosis (a disconnection with reality and the inability to differentiate reality and subjective experience) like hallucinations and delusions (Nolen-Hoeksema, 2014). Hallucinations are perceptual experiences

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    SPECIAL POPULATION Psychiatrists often encounters patients who are in special situations such as pregnancy, extreme of ages and/or medically ill. These situations cause deviation from the normal physiological process of the body and renders the group vulnerable to adverse drug effect. Therefore it is crucial for the clinicians to have fair knowledge about appropriate medication selection and dosing while treating these special populations. Psychiatric illness during pregnancy is not an uncommon scenario

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    Essay On Bulimia Nervosa

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    characterized by a persistent disturbance of eating that impairs health or psychosocial functioning. The disorders include anorexia nervosa, binge eating disorder, and bulimia nervosa [1]. The aim of this review is focused on the use of drugs (antipsychotics, antidepressants, mood stabilizers, and appetite stimulants) in the treatment of Anorexia Nervosa (AN) and Bulimia Nervosa (BN). Anorexia Nervosa AN was first described by Sir William Withey Gull in 1873, and is a serious and potentially life-threatening

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    theorist, techniques and practical applications of psychopharmacology on schizophrenia are important part of psychological history. Pharmacopsychology, a term now known as psychopharmacology, as defined by Psychology Today is the use of drugs such as antipsychotics and antidepressants to aid in the dissipation of symptoms that can accompany a mental disorder. The use of psychedelics as a treatment for mental discomfort is far from a new concept. For thousands of years many tribes and hunter-gatherer societies

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