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    Women in Anglo-Saxon England

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    Women in Anglo-Saxon England Anglo-Saxon literature was based on Germanic myths about battles, heroes, diseases, dragons and religion. Writers did not pay much attention to female issues, and there are only few poems that talk about them. Beowulf and “"The Wife’s Lament"” are two examples that briefly consider women’s lives in that time. Anglo-Saxon history and poetry portray women’s lives as uneasy and dependent on their husbands’ positions. Women had to endure arranged marriages, abuse and

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    Runes and Magic in Beowulf and in Anglo-Saxon England In the Old English poem Beowulf we see the mention of runes, which were used with connotations of magic or charms. Examining evidence from historic times, we find that early Englishmen were fully conversant with the Germanic runic alphabet and that runes did have special connotations. In Beowulf the hero is in deadly combat with Grendel’s mother in the mere. He is at the point of being killed by the monster when suddenly God shows

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    Christianity in Anglo-Saxon England Through the efforts of Augustine and his monks, the relationship between Christianity and the government in Anglo-Saxon England changed dramatically. Pope Gregory declared that “St. Augustine and his companions led the English race to the knowledge of truth, not only by preaching the Word but also by showing heavenly signs” (Bede 101). Pope Gregory, prompted by divine inspiration, sent Augustine and several other monks to England to convert the Anglo-Saxons to Christianity

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    Attitude Toward Warfare in Beowulf

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    described Anglo-Saxon England as a region dominated by warlike, belligerent tribes of Germanic descent. These people constantly fought for territories and treasures, which they possessed or wished to acquire. It was the duty of a king or a lord to acquire jewels and armor for his people and that was how he kept his kinsmen loyal to him. In the legendary epic poem, Beowulf, these traits of Anglo-Saxon culture are clearly defined. The character of Beowulf is a true representative of Anglo-Saxon culture

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    Women’s Roles in the Epic of Beowulf

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    having freedom of choice, range of activity, and room for personal growth and development, such as is reflected in Anglo-Saxon England of the time. Beowulf makes reference to Ingeld and his wife and the coming Heathobard feud: in that hot passion his love for peace-weaver,                    his wife, will cool (2065-66) This is a rare passage, for Anglo-Saxon poetry rarely mentions romantic feelings toward women. In fact, one’s marital status wasn’t even considered significant

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    influences the church. This is naturally because it is the people from a society who make up the church....and those same people became the personalities that created these tales of a pilgrimmage to Canterbury. The Christianization of Anglo-Saxon England was to take place in a relatively short period of time, but this was not because of the success of the Augustinian effort. Indeed, the early years of this mission had an ambivalence which shows in the number of people who hedged their bets by

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    political system changed with the introduction of feudalism. In addition, Norman French prompted the English language to change. While many people believe these modifications are the most significant Norman impacts upon England, the Norman Conquest’s influence on women’s roles in England was no less remarkable. As history has shown time and time again, the death of a ruler brings about drastic changes in that ruler’s nation. This was the indeed case in the death of the English king Edward the Confessor

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    Anglia Introduction The spot of an early 7th century Anglo-Saxon ship burial, discovered in 1939 that includes a wealth of artifacts is the famous Sutton Hoo, located near Woodbridge, Suffolk. Sutton Hoo is of very importance to early medieval historians because it shacks light on a period in English history that otherwise has little documented evidence remaining. Actually, it is one of the most notable archaeological remains in England because of its size, age, far reaching connections, totality

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    Epic of Beowulf

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    meant to be spoken aloud, very few of them were ever written down, and very few of them survived into modern times. Known as the first poem of the English literature, Beowulf is the major literary monument of Old English literature and of Anglo-Saxon England. The original work was written around the year 1000. The myth that Beowulf embodies has captured the modern imagination and placed the poem among the masterpieces of world literature. The poem documents the values, questions, and attitudes of

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    troublous; the nation bloomed the unique floral that represents the thoughts of people in England. The unique love towards the nation, the humanity, and God has became the Muse of the British authors. Through the periods of history, the eternal love from the people towards the magnificent understandings of England inspire them to innovate during the "curious days" in

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