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    The Evolution of Anglicanism

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    I. Introduction The History of Anglicanism is a very fascinating part of English history, and often a misunderstood part as well. Many believe erroneously that Anglicanism came about purely as a result of King Henry VIII desiring a new wife, and creating a new religion was the only way to do so. The truth is a good deal more complicated. There is also the fascinating shift from Anglicanism being essentially Catholic, just with a different head of church, to be being one of Catholicism’s greatest

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    which include, Baptist, Lutheran, Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Protestant, and Anglicanism. Each denomination of Christianity has different origins, features, rituals, beliefs, practices, developments and evolutions. With its headquarters in Canterbury, Anglicanism is one denomination that came about before the Reformation and from Roman Catholicism. Known as the Episcopal Church in the United States, Anglicanism began when King of England, King Henry VIII, had a dispute over marriage rights with

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    Renaissance Essay

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    study of God. Some Renaissance religious leaders had the belief that corrupt cities could be redeemed if their citizens sincerely practiced Christianity. (Hankins Web) During this time of the English Renaissance: Roman Catholicism, Puritanism, and Anglicanism were popular religions that played a major role during this period. The Roman Catholic Church is the largest body of Christians in the world. Catholics are concentrated more heavily in North America, Europe and South America than any other place

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    Homosexuality and the Anglican Church

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    countries of Uganda, Nigeria, and Tanzania. Anglicanism was seen as a predominately English religion, but with the aid of globalization and missionary works Anglicanism is now recognized as a world wide religion. The way Anglicanism came to be established within North America and Africa has helped to shape each regions views on homosexuality. Christianity was a religion that grew along wi... ... middle of paper ... ...n. A History of Global Anglicanism. New York: Cambridge, 2006. The author

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    Samuel Seabury

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    Born in Groton, Conn., Samuel Seabury was the son of the Reverend Samuel Seabury Sr. His Father was a pioneer of New England Anglicanism who followed the example of Samuel Johnson. Samuel Jr.,broke away from the Congregationalists and pursued Anglican ordination. He graduated from Yale in 1744 and received his B.A in 1748. He married Abigail Mumford and went abroad in 1784 to obtain consecration as an Anglican Priest. On December 23, 1753, Samuel Seabury was ordained a deacon and two days later a

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    Elizabethan Settlement

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    became the ruling monarch of England she wanted to relieve the tension between the Protestants and the Catholics. Elizabeth decided on a compromise between the two religions, one that would have characteristics of both, this new religion was called Anglicanism. The factors that caused Elizabeth to make this decision were her personal religious preferences, the views of the Marian Bishops and the opinions given to her by the parliament. However this compromise did have consequences. These include the dissatisfaction

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    The Anglican Liturgy

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    “…the Prayer Book is not only a manual of public devotions, it contains the fullest statement of the teaching of the Church”. This understanding of the prayer book as the dominant treatise of Anglican belief is central to this essays argument that the Episcopal Book of Common Prayer (1979), and particularly its rite of Baptism, has fundamentally shifted Anglican thinking and liturgical practice in relation to Eucharist and ministry. We will explore this argument by first clarifying what is said

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    Anglicanism is a denomination within Christianity comprising the Church of England and churches which are historically tied to it or have similar beliefs, worship practices and church structures. Anglicans base their faith on the Bible, traditions of the apostolic the concept of apostolic succession, and writings of the Church Fathers. Anglicanism forms one of the branches of Western Christianity, having fully declared its independence from the Holy See at the time of the Elizabethan Religious Settlement

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    Christianity. Defined in Romans 8:9 through the following Bible passage “You, however, are not in the realm of the flesh but are in the realm of the Spirit, if indeed the Spirit of God lives in you. And if anyone does not have the Spirit of Christ, they do not belong to Christ.”. Through the three differing, yet similar churches of the Catholics, Anglicans and Uniting, this passage can be translated in various altered forms, which subsequently transforms the spirituality of the followers under each

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    Throughout history there have been examples of religion being regarded as traditional and of people dissenting from the traditional religion. This essay will trace the footsteps of tradition and dissent of Christianity in England between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries by looking at the statement “… a previous generation’s “dissent” itself becomes “tradition”, and a previously dominant tradition becomes dissent.” (Tradition and Dissent p72). With particular reference to the differences between

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