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    An Ideal Husband

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    Set in the late nineteenth century, Oscar Wilde’s An Ideal Husband points out that the individuals are flawed as introduced by the irony of the play’s title. In this play, Sir Robert Chiltern is a man of wealth and power and is viewed as an ideal husband by his wife, Lady Chiltern. Though he appears to be faultless, he does in fact have an imperfection. The spurious origin of Sir Robert’s successful career and status can be traced to his prior indiscretion, but this secret must be kept confidential

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    Oscar Wilde's An Ideal Husband Oscar Wilde (1845-1903) lived an outrageous and controversial life which was well publicized and condemned, as his life defied the strict social mores of the time. He was put into this public position due to the success of his plays which challenged Victorian earnestness while being hilariously funny. His plays, in particular An Ideal Husband, 1895 portray Victorian society as viciously hypocritical at it's worst and laughably pretentious at it's best. Wilde

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    In Oscar Wilde's play, “An Ideal Husband” Wilde's touches upon and focuses on many different sorts of themes such as forgiveness and the past and also marriage. Out of all these many different themes that this play explores in society around the time of 1895, the one that stood out to me the most and I found most striking was the theme of Femininity. Throughout the time that this play took place, Femininity was a very uncommon occurrence to experience. However Wilde uses this theme in order to emphasize

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    A very intelligent novelist, Oscar Wilde, catches his reader’s attention in his satirical play, An Ideal Husband, through a humorous drama filled political scandal and blackmail. Wilde sucks his audience into the romantic comedy by placing the reader with the characters throughout all their battles—in which he points out their bad habits and their faults. Wilde accomplishes drawing readers in by creating the satirical message of his play through satirical elements such as exaggeration, sarcasm,

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    Idealism in Oscar Wilde’s An Ideal Husband

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    that are often unrealistic. An idealistic person holds high standards for their future. The vision that an individual has for themselves often plays a part in how their life occurs. Oscar Wilde’s 1895 satire, An Ideal Husband, depicts the lives of idealists and the fruition of their ideals. The play revolves around the tumultuous and highly public lives of Robert and Gertrude Chiltern. Robert is a prestigious member of the House of Commons married to an active and well respected socialite, Gertrude

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    Oscar Wilde, An Ideal Husband Oscar Wilde wrote An Ideal Husband in 1895, during the decade known as the "Yellow" or "Naughty Nineties", a movement with its roots in dandyism and decadence, the twilight years of England's Victorian era, reflecting decay and scandal . Some biographers suggest that Wilde might have been inspired by a number of events which occurred in his private life, to write this play , as it is the case for the dandified character of Lord Goring, which one could say is the

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    Oscar Wilde began to write An Ideal Husband in the summer of 1893, he completed it later that winter. At the time of when it was written, he was familiarised to success, and in writing this play he wanted to guarantee himself to stay in the public eye. An ideal husband is one of the most serious social comedies that Oscar Wilde published, it contains bold political tinges, ironically and pessimistically looking at the current political background. The central focus of the play is the corruption of

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    An Ideal Husband, Oscar Wilde - Lord Goring and Lady Chiltern ‘Discuss how Wilde influences the audience to like or dislike characters’ In my paper, I will discuss two entirely different people, both of whom have entirely different personalities but are both the characters in the play, ‘An Ideal husband’- Lord Goring and Mrs. Chiltern. I will also mention the reasons and ways in which Oscar Wilde has managed to make them liked and disliked by the audience. Lord Goring Background

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    An Ideal Husband is a play written by Oscar Wilde. The play focuses on the subject of a perfect husband in a marriage. The play is set during the Victorian era in London, England. The scene starts out at a dinner party hosted by Sir Robert Chiltern and his wife Lady Gertrude Chiltern. The primary guests at the dinner party are Lord Goring and Mrs. Cheveley. Mrs. Cheveley is the antagonist in the play she blackmails Sir Robert and tries to destroy his marriage by digging up a secret in his past and

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    The primary theme of this play is love and marriage and Wilde explores the male and female role expectations, beliefs and ideals of domestic relationships of the upper class British society in the late 1890’s. The social norms of the Victorian era had strict rules for the behaviours of men and women. For women, who were legally their husband’s property until 1884, high standards were expected. They were to run a respectable household, delegate servants, be quite, compassionate, ladylike and virtuous

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    all Janie's husband at one point in her life.  Although they all behaved differently, in lifestyle as well as their relationship with Janie, they all shared certain similarities. Janie's first husband was a poor old soul named Logan Killicks.  He was an ugly, dirty farmer whose prime concern for Janie was that she do her share of the work in order to keep the farm up and running.  Janie was simply another pair of hands to do some work.  When compared with Janie's second husband, Logan seems

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    sells his love for Lona Hessel in return for the large dowry of her step-sister Betty, whom he does not love. To forget his treachery, he enters into a clandestine relationship with an actress of the town. When surprised in her room by the drunken husband, young Bernick jumps out of the window, and then graciously accepts the offer of his bosom friend, Johan, to let him take the blame. Johan, together with his faithful sister Lona, leaves for America. In return for his devotion, young Bernick helps

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    Pat Barker's Regeneration

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    In Pat Barker's novel Regeneration, there is little doubt that the cult of Oscar Wilde had taken hold already in the first decades of the twentieth century. In Oscar Wilde's Last Stand, Philip Hoarer informs us that by associating with Robert Ross, Wilfred Owen "was allying himself with the cult of Oscar Wilde: hero, mentor and martyr to an entire culture" (Hoarer 15). In some manner, the unraveling of this statement is what makes the references to Wilde so important in Barker's novel. Barker makes

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    sixteen years after Wilde's death, published his biography, Oscar Wilde, as a memoir of his own cherished relationship with Wilde, for whom he had served as literary editor and friend.  Just this past year in 2000, after a popular film remake of An Ideal Husband, Belford published Oscar Wilde: A Certain Genius, a tribute to the man and the literary works for which he is famous. Oscar Wilde provides an intimate portrait of the poet, playwright, and self-described aesthete.  Born one year after Wilde

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    The Odyssey

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    complete happiness: Odysseus slights all of these things in order for him to return to his loving wife and son. The concept of true commitment was a very commendable quality for a Greek hero to possess. With this character trait, Odysseus models the ideal husband, father, and leader. Unfortunately, in today’s society, one rarely encounters such outstanding morality. Being raised in an explicit society, a decrease in certain morals has become fashionable. In particular, the college experience has become

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    of New Orleans. While her husband, Léonce, adores her, she does not truly love him and their relationship appears platonic. Robert, a young paramour, woos Edna and she finds herself with wants and desires. Edna later experiments with a known womanizer named Alceé, and uncovers more passions. While Edna fails to fully come into her own in society, she awakens her sexuality through her experiences with the aforementioned men. Léonce appears to be an ideal husband for the turn of the nineteenth

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    My Favourite Husband was an American radio program that was broadcasted from the year 1948 to 1951 on CBS Radio. This situational comedy centered around the lives of the Cooper family, and starred Lucille Ball as Liz Cooper and Richard Denning as George Cooper (My Favorite Husband). Through the close analysis of the My Favorite Husband episode titled “Learning to Drive”, one can see that the program relies on verbal communication to structure the diegesis and build a narrative that fulfills the

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    The Ideal of Marriage

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    The Ideal of Marriage In today's society most marriages have different perspectives of an ideal marriage. Some married couples are totally faithful, honest and respectful to one other, meaning the wife and the husband are together and living happy in there married life, other married couples may tend to cheat and disrespect each other, meaning that the married couple are not together or are separated may be there opinion of the ideal marriage. In the medieval period Chaucer, writes to his audience

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    independence and recognition. Ibsen’s A Doll’s House presents an image of an ideal marriage to demonstrate that the 19th century social expectations on husband and wife were unrealistic. Ibsen’s play is set up in the first act to present to the readers a happy marriage. The house is well furnished with a piano, Christmas is around the corner, and Nora has just arrived home after an afternoon of shopping. Nora and her husband exchange flirty and friendly introductions,

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    They also have distinct and specific expectations about husbands’ and wives’ obligations. The Romans usually honor these responsible wives and set them as outstanding examples of pietas. Turia, for instance, is an excellent model who manifests wives’ good behaviors and their loyalty to husbands. The inscription, written by Turia’s husband, indicates different components for ideal marriages, such as women’s good personalities and duties, husbands’ love to wives, and family financial management. Her story

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