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    something like a man coming back to life, a child walking on water, or a woman turning water into wine. Miracles do not play by the rules for they are always under scrutiny and yet people still find themselves believing in them. Within “An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding” by David Hume, Hume explores the notion of miracles and questions what drives people to believe in these miracles that are not grounded in facts but by faith. Upon reading this piece, a question that may arise for some is even though

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    explain how we form the beliefs about the world. While his claim is wildly accepted by many philosophers, there are still problems to his principle which Hume ignored as something insufficient. By analysing sections 2 of David Hume’s “Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding”, we are able to distinguish

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    Cause and Effect in David Hume’s An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding In An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding, David Hume states, “there is not, in any single, particular instance of cause and effect, any thing which can suggest the idea of power or necessary connexion” (Hume, 1993: 41). Hume establishes in section II that all ideas originate from impressions that employ the senses (11). Therefore, in order for there to be an idea of power or “necessary connexion,” there must be

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    concept comes to exist in one’s mind is itself a concept worth examining. Many philosophers have looked for the origin of thought in the human mind, and many different reasons for this origin have been put forth. As a philosopher, it is only fitting that Hume would propose his own framework for human thinking. For Hume, perceptions are developed either as the understanding of the outside world, or as recollections of these events or alterations of these memories within the mind¹. This distinction is important

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    In this paper, I shall summarise a portion of Hume's (1748) An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding. Namely, section four, Sceptical Doubts Concerning the Operations of the Understanding, and, section five, Sceptical Solutions of these Doubts, focusing on the text's key points. Section four begins with Hume asserting that human reasoning and enquiry can be divided into two types, namely, Relations of Ideas, and, Matters of Fact. In terms of relations of ideas, Hume has in mind a priori operations

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    David Hume, in his Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding, claims that a reasonable person should not believe in miracles, especially if they are informed of a miracle through testimony; his argument concerning why people should be unable to believe a miracle is cogent, but he fails to adequately explain why people do believe in miracles even though they should not be able to. His theory about miracles is based on a previously outlined idea which Hume calls “constant conjunction”; people use the

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    be true most of the time. It is based on predictions and behavior. In David Hume’s “An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding”, he proposes two types of human enquiry: relations of ideas and matters of fact. The two common examples that represent the two enquiries are mathematics and science. Hume argues that people who rely on induction - cause and effect to perceive the world have no understanding of it since there does not exist any justification for them to believe in induction at the first

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    In An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding by David Hume, the idea of miracles is introduced. Hume’s argument is that there is no rational reason for human beings to believe in miracles, and that it is wrong to have miracles as the building blocks for religion. It is because the general notion of miracles come from the statement of others who claim to have seen them, Hume believes that there is no way to prove that those accounts are accurate, because they were not experienced first-hand. In order

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    Problem of Induction In this paper, I will discuss Hume’s “problem of induction,” his solution to the problem, and whether or not his solution to the problem is correct. In David Hume 's 'An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding ', Hume states that no actual proof exists to suggest that future occurrences will happen the way previous occurrences did. His solution to this “problem of induction” is that our beliefs about cause and effect are based out of pure habit of thought that we have become

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    Agreeing With David Hume's Theory on Miracles

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    a miracle may exist, “Unless the testimony be of such a kind, that its falsehood would be more miraculous” (Enquiry X.1, p. 77). Hume believes that the only way a miracle may occur is if the falsehood of the testimony would be a greater miracle, which is not possible to occur. Human testimony has no real connection with any miraculous event. Experience is what provides the ability for humans to believe in something. Experience provides truth, remembrance, and dismisses false statements when they are

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