Free Afrikaner Essays and Papers

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Free Afrikaner Essays and Papers

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    Apartheid and Afrikaner Nationalism

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    cultural and political beliefs of Afrikaners, the minority of whites that descended from early Dutch colonizers. In light of this knowledge, it is clear that Afrikaner nationalism was the main force behind Apartheid. The development of Afrikaner nationalism led to the creation of Apartheid. Afrikaner nationalism was a combination of the cultural and political beliefs of Afrikaners in South Africa. The philosophy not only reflected the beliefs of Afrikaners, but it eventually embodied the ethnic

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    Afrikaners' Establishment of Apartheid in 1948 During the seventeenth century South Africa was colonized by English and Dutch, the decedents of the Dutch settlers became known as as Boers who were determined to live by their own rules and not to be controlled by anyone else, they wanted economical end geographical control, but most of all the wanted to be segregated from all non-whites, the wanted Apartheid: Afrikaans: "apartness", a policy that governed relations between South Africa's

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    South Africa: A Case Study Analysis

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    under the apartheid have contributed to the stunting of South Africa’s economic development. South Africa was initially colonized by the Dutch, who arrived at the Cape of Good Hope in 1652. Albeit, the tellers of South African history, mainly the Afrikaners, claim that the area was essentially unoccupied at the time the Dutch arrived, there were actually indigenous tribes already there which the Dutch then enslaved. Moving forward to 1795, the Dutch colony was seized by the British. Because of the

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    The time of the 1940’s in South Africa was defined by racial oppression of the native inhabitants of the country by the Dutch Boers, also known as the Afrikaners. These people were the demographic minority yet also the political majority. They executed almost complete control over the lives of the natives through asinine rules and harsh punishments. The highly esteemed novel Cry, the Beloved Country tells a story of Stephen Kumalo, a black priest dealing with the struggles of living in the South

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    SOUTH AFRICAN APARTHEID South Africa, the richest of the continent’s countries, was also one with the most complex and confined racial relations. From the 17th century, settlers came to service the maritime traffic around the Cape. By the 19th century, the Boers had migrated inland from Cape Town and began setting up farms, ranches and vineyards. The expansion of Zulu power forced the British rulers and Dutch settler into Zulu wars that, culminated in 1879, broke the last black empire in the region

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    Apartheid In South Africa

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    Apartheid was a system of segregation implemented in 1948 by the Afrikaner National Party in South Africa. It put into laws the dissociation of races that had been practiced in the area since the Cape Colony's founding in 1652 by the Dutch East India Company. This system served as the basis for white domination in South Africa for forty-six years until its abolition in 1994. Apartheid's abolition was brought on by resistance movements and an unstable economy and prompted the election of South America's

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    British Imperialism

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    eventually achieved its main goals. It protected its holding at Cape Town, which was essential in order to control the southern trade route to India, and resisted the threats of increased European presence in South Africa as well as the threat of Afrikaner nationalism in Cape Colony and in the Boer Republics that bordered it. British investors held about half the stock of the mining industries in the Boer Republics, so the protection of the industry was vital not only to the interests of those particular

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    Language Development: Afrikaans

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    When people need to communicate even though there is no common ground, they have to find and develop a certain system of a simplified communication to interact. This introduces us to a pidgin. A pidgin arises for the communication between two or more social groups. There is one dominant language and one less dominant. A pidgin is not aimed at learning but rather it is used as a bridge to connect people with different language backgrounds. The less dominant language is the one that develops this ‘restricted

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    The Apartheid started in 1948 when Dr. Malan’s National Party beat the United Party who wanted integration. After the National Party won they had been given the Sauer report, which said that they had to choose between integration or an Apartheid. They chose the Apartheid which meant racial segregation of all of the races. They were split into 3 groups black, coloured and white and they were forced to move to an area specifically designated to their colour. There was petty Apartheid introduced so

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    Apartheid in Literature

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    term 'Apartheid'. In my present scope of research, the term 'Apartheid' turned into 'a drastic, systematic program of social engineering' (Thompson 2001). As a result of the NP [National Party] use[ing] its control of the government to fulfil Afrikaner ethnic goals as well as white racial goals (Thompson 2001). This is further agreed by Mandela as it is described as one of the most powerful and effective systems of oppression ever conceived. Literature on the Apartheid In studying the different

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