Free African Americans in the United States Congress Essays and Papers

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    the revolution, when he gave the name Le Conservateur to a journal he issued to propagate the cause of a clerical and political Restoration in France. Thereafter name is rapidly adopted by many other groups opposed the progress of the Revolution. American Republicans and British Tory's are calling themselves 'conservatives' by early 1830's. p. 9-10  Precursors to the attitude of the revolutionaries where: two centuries preceding Revolution see increasing tendency to abandon the traditional pessimism

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    1988 allowed reparations for Japanese Americans illegally detained by the United States Government during World War II. Many assumed that the Civil Liberties Act of 1988 would help African American attain reparations for slavery. Legislation introduced in Congress each year since 1989 to create a commission to study the effects of slavery and segregation, has never been addressed as a serious issue. The fight for reparations in both the Japanese and African American communities have followed the same

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    Reconstruction Reconstruction was a time that defined what African Americans were to society and how they were accepted in the United States. Many reforms and amendments caused a difference in the lives of African-Americans for freedom and equality. The road to equality was difficult and many did not support what the government was trying to do. In my aftermath of reconstruction African- Americans still did not have full equality. In the beginning of the Reconstruction of the south, there were

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    Reverse Racism: A Continual Debate

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    Patricia Steffes worked at Pepsi Company for over twenty years. During one of her later years at the company, she was up for a promotion. Pepsi did not award her the job though. Instead they hired a man who happened to be an African-American. Steffes was outraged over this incident claiming that because of Pepsi’s ‘aggressive minority promotion program’ Pepsi hired a less-qualified minority candidate in order to comply with this program. Steffes wrote to the Equal Opportunities Commission as well

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    was because they would try to persuade many African Americans to quit their jobs before their contracts would expire. In certain states where there were more African Americans than whites such as, Mississippi or South Carolina the Black Codes were harsher than in any other states. For example, in Mississippi a rule that if anyone without any type of job before January 1 of 1866 would be arrested if they could not pay a fee of 50 dollars. Many Congress members during Johnson’s time if office disliked

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    for people of African/Black descent. Black Power became popular in the 1960s. The real word for black power is Black Nationalism. Look at Malcom X, civil rights activist and minster he was the voice of northern urban “second ghettoes”. He was born in Omaha, Nebraska and grew up Lansing, Michigan. Malcom was sent to juvenile detention home. He drop out of school at the age of 15. Malcom did suffer a life of racism, struggles and tribulations but he manage to attract African Americans. His popularity

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    Lincoln, on September 22, 1862. It was a push to end slavery in the south. The Emancipation Proclamation changed society for the better, by giving blacks hope for a brighter future. The process was long, but slavery would be no more. It affected African-Americans, because they were going to finally have their freedom. It also affected the president because he, metaphorically speaking, signed his own death bill. The signing of the Emancipation Proclamation upset most of southern whites, who were pro-slavery

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    Reconstruction

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    post-Civil War era in the U.S. between 1865 and 1877. Under Abraham Lincoln, presidential reconstruction began in each state as soon as federal troops controlled most of the state. The usual ending date is 1877, when the Compromise of 1877 saw the collapse of the last Republican state governments in the South Reconstruction opened many doors for its newly freed African American citizens. One the many doors, were those of political office. Though these doors opened for blacks in a variety of places

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    the Constitution of the United States was the first amendment added to the Constitution immediately after the Civil War. The Thirteenth Amendment officially outlawed slavery. The Thirteenth Amendment was adopted December 18, 1865 which says, “Section 1: Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction. Section 2: Congress shall have power to enforce

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    Throughout the history of the United States, racial discrimination has always been around our society. Many civil rights movements and laws had helped to minimize the amount of discrimination towards every single citizen, but discrimination is something that will not ever disappear. On March 15, 1965, Lyndon Baines Johnson gave a speech that pointed out the racial injustice and human rights problems of America in Washington D.C. He wanted every citizen of the United States to support his ideas to overcome

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    African American Racism

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    For decades, African Americans have been on a racial discrimination and extremely deadly roller coaster ride for justice and equality. In this new day and age, racial tendencies and prejudice has improved since the 1700-1800s,however, they are slowly going back to certain old ways with voting laws and restaurants having the option to serve blacks or not. It all began with the start of slavery around 1619. The start of the New World, the settlers needed resources England and other countries had, which

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    Jefferson took a shape of the United States in the nineteenth century. The Federalists, led by Hamilton, advocated a strong central government could lead the country forward. Their opposition was the Democratic Republicans, led by Jefferson, trusted the common man could make decision for the country and emphasized the importance of decreasing power of the central government and increasing state’s right. Both political parties had good intentions for the future of the United States and had a strong influence

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    reality, would not be possible without the movements made in the 1960s. Following the Civil War of the 1860s, the United States slowly progressed towards the need for civil rights, originally for African-Americans but advanced to include all Americans. Over the course of one hundred years, the United States Congress failed repeatedly to pass laws protecting the rights of the American people regardless of “race, color, religion, sex, or national origin.” The Civil Rights Act of 1964, a law President

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    for liberty from Europe, the political system of the United States had change for good. The United States had made improvement in their government structure to make the country a better place. The country has being affected in many different ways since the departure from the mother country. Due to the liberty the American people wanted, they had to make a government that could lead them to a better country than the mother country. The American people had being making many improvements to the government

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    The Pan-African Movement

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    definition is a movement for the political union of all African nations (Merriam-Webster Dictionary). However, to me Pan Africanism has two meanings. The first meaning is all Africans and African Americans whether in Africa or in the diaspora coming together as brothers and sisters unifying as one. The second meaning is all the African nations coming together as one. The Pan African movement was brought about because the Africans and African Americans in the diaspora were tired of colonialism and slavery

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    them. He also believed that African Americans should not be allowed to vote. President Johnson’s idea of reconstruction was very lenient, especially when it came to his views about the South. With Johnson in power, few Confederate leaders were punished and racism and the beating/killing or African Americans were still present and frequent. President Johnson did not do must to further the reconstruction of the United States, and he was not the president that the United States needed during that time.

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    Events that Affected United States History after the Civil War Following the American Civil War (1861-1865) the United States Congress passed the trio Civil War amendments; the 13th Amendment (1865), the 14th Amendment (1868), and the 15th (1870) Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The 13th Amendment spearheaded by President Lincoln led to the abolishment of slavery, the 14th Amendment provided citizenship to all persons born or naturalized in the United States (including freed slaves), and the

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    children, “are henceforth…free.” Thus began the idea and process of remitting the rebel southern states back into the Union or what is known as Reconstruction. As the War raged on and the Confederate states fell back under Union control these wartime ideas were put into place. President Lincoln pushed for a rather fast pace of remittance, forgiving the southern states for their wayward ways. While Congress, in what would become known as the radical wing of the Republican Party, wanted to abolish the

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    with no restrictions applied to them. During the Reconstruction era (1865-1877), where the South left the Union and fell into shambles as trying to declare themselves as an individual state, but then they were returned to the Union by the Reconstruction Act of 1867, there was an issue about the freedom of African Americans abolished of slavery. However, before the Reconstruction Act was executed, there was controversy between different plans on how to rejoice the South back into the union; Lincoln’s

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    Reparations For Descendents of African Slaves in America Slavery has been entwined with American history ever since Dutch traders brought twenty captive Africans to Jamestown, Virginia in 1619. Slavery in America is a subject with minimal truths and stories rarely told. The public school system excludes the fact that eight of the first twelve American presidents were major slaveholders. Emancipation brought freedom, but not approximation. The civil rights movement killed Jim Crow, but shadows

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