Free African-American Male Essays and Papers

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    The African-American Male

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    urban African-American male, one must further explain the educational system, racism toward the African-American male, and male role models in society; in doing so it will interpret the meaning to Jawanza Kunjufu first volume: Countering the Conspiracy to Destroy Black Boys (2004). I. Educational System a. Lack of Information/ Dropouts b. Fourth Grade Syndrome c. Black Male Teachers II. Racism for males a. In the Environment b. Economically c. Rights as a Citizen III. Male Role

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    African American Male Feminist

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    of an African American male feminist is a relatively new concept that is rapidly growing. Alexander Crummell, who was an advocate of black feminism stated, “For, humble and benighted as she is, the black woman of the South is one of the queens of womanhood. If there is any other woman on this earth who in native aboriginal qualities is her superior, I know not where she is to be found.” Before I discuss the importance, relevance and substance of what it is to be not only a successful male feminist

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    Portrayal of African American Males They squirmed, pencils tapping their desks anxiously; none of their papers contained more than five names. Eventually, all thirteen pairs of eyes made their way from the papers, to the faces of their friends, and eventually, they restlessly shifted over to me and stopped. “This is hard,” whined one seventh grade voice. Another chimed in, “It’s all the same, I can’t think of any more.” The question I had asked was simple: “Please list as many young African American

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    problem and also help the adolescent mother following her decision to give birth to a child. In some places, such as Oakland, California, 73% of adolescents giving birth are African American (Smith, 1988, p.269; Massey, 1991, p. 117). With this in mind, social workers have spent most of their efforts helping adolescent African-American women. The Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) and Aid to Families of Dependent Children (AFDC) offer help for many women and their children. Unfortunately

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    To further understand why some African American male teachers became teachers and why they want to become teacher, I interviewed teachers currently in the field • Ervin M. Thomas a teacher of 15 years in Jersey City, New Jersey Says that he became I chose to become an educator because I knew there was a need for a black man who understood the population he serviced… I wanted to be the sympathetic educator that I wish I had throughout my education…. I believed that if I was able to help those students

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    Data proves that America does not have enough African American males teaching in today’s schools. As a matter of fact, only 2% of America’s nearly five million teachers are black men (Bryan 1). In our American society, more and more African American females are fiercely taking over both public and private classrooms. Although this might be a great accomplishment, school officials believes that if more black males teach, it would reduce the numbers of minority achievement gaps and dropout rates

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    This issue is very near to my heart. The social problem that I’m writing about is African American young men that lack the opportunities early in life that result in them making bad choices that affect the rest of their life. Working with youth in an area where there are often few opportunities for kids in general to find ways to occupy themselves in positive exciting activities and to be certain of, that the goals they once completely felt were reachable but now see them as unreachable, is disturbing

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    Recently, the media has caused many stereotypes due to portraying African American males playing feminine roles. This perspective depicts men of color wearing attire outside of the stereotypical sagging pants and oversized t-shirts. It depicts an educated man with social class and sophistication. To date, society holds African American men to rigid stereotypes and a high standard of masculinity. However, once a man of color steps outside societal stereotypes and into the perspective reflected

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    One hundred African American males will be randomly selected from different group homes and foster care facilities around Prince Georges County. The participants will have to complete a questionnaire before the random selection is made. The requirements for the potential participants are as follow: They have to be 14 to 18 years of age, been in the foster care system for at least 12 months, males of African descent, and have not been previously diagnosed with any mental disorder. Measures The materials

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    to understand the experiences of African American males and to explore the factors which allowed them to be successful in their matriculation through college to graduation and the factors which may have inhibited them from being as successful which may have impacted their college experiences. By using a qualitative approach, the researcher will be able to gather data that will reflect the unique experiences of the participants. Even though African American males attending colleges have increased

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    Reaching Up for Manhood

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    Reaching Up for Manhood Under-privileged, African-American boys are more prevalent in today's society than the typical person would like to recognize or admit. These boys seem to be faced with an ideal in which they need to follow or conform to as any and all cultures have. However, the problem is that for these boys, this ideal or way of living is believed to be met. Black boys growing up in Harlem are expected to act tough, not take any crap from anybody, and always seem to be strong no matter

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    Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison

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    In Ralph Ellison’s novel, Invisible Man, the narrator is a young, African-American male who believes that he is invisible. Throughout the novel, he spends a great amount of time and effort trying to figure out his identity and find a way to make himself visible in society. One of the narrator’s main attempts brings him to join an organization known as the Brotherhood, where he is able to utilize his talent for public speaking as an advocate for the Brotherhood and all that they stand for. But even

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    more enlightened time, being of Taiwanese and Jamaican blood he and his parents were abandoned by his family and outcast among their neighbors. He frequently had to cover his face in cloths and garments just to walk outside. Growing up as an African-American male despite the going enlightenment of our time one cannot escape being an outcast among my own people because of be it color, gender, or sexual orientation. Even some women of color today have to worry about the darkness of their skin, not among

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    importance of a name or lack thereof has never been exposed in such a prolific manner before The Invisible Man was published. Also, the diversity of the African-American male is showcased in this piece if literature in a way that is second to none. It was always said that The Invisible Man is an unofficial hand book for the young African American male that has high hopes and aspirations of becoming successful in life.

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    Columbine Film Review

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    Bowling for Columbine: The Media’s Falsity A common theme throughout Michael Moore’s documentary, Bowling for Columbine, is the fact that the media is able to produce fallacies and fear in the American public. Michael Moore says, “American media is being pumped with fear”. As Americans, we are bombarded with media everyday through televisions, magazines, and radio. But most of us do not stop to ponder its effects within our culture. Fear and violence are strongly correlated, and it is amazing how

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    his 'hibernation' are his permanent condition" (109). Ellison's protagonist, the effaced narrator, is a young African-American male from the segregated deep south, who b... ... middle of paper ... ...iction: New Studies in the Afro-American Novel since 1945.  Ed. A. Robert Lee.  London: Vision Press, 1980.  54-73. Klein, Marcus.  "Ralph Ellison."  After Alienation: American Novels in Mid-Century.  Cleveland: World Pub., 1964.  71-146. Langman, F.H.  "Reconsidering Invisible Man."  The

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    Islam

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    It may seem similar and it may not, but what we do know, is that they both believe that they are Muslims. The Islamic beliefs of the black American male and the males of the Middle East are the same. My argument lies in the question of whether or not Africans can call themselves true Muslims, believers and followers of the Islamic faith. To be considered a true Muslim you must follow the rules and regulations of the Islamic faith. What is Islam? Islam is defined as "the complete acceptance of and

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    Gender & Jim Crow: Book Review

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    between African Americans and white in North Caroline from 1896 to 1920, as well as relations between the men and women of the time. She looks at the influences each group had on the Progressive Era, both politically and socially. Gilmore’s arguments concern African American male political participation, middle-class New South men, and African American female political influences. The book follows a narrative progression of African American progress and relapse. Gilmore argues that African American

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    seneca village

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    seneca village When people think of Central Park, the thought of African-Americans once owning the land is inconceivable. Yet, this was the case 150 years ago when there once thrived a place called Seneca Village. The land known as Seneca Village was originally farmland owned by John and Elizabeth Whitehead. Andrew Williams, an African-American male, bought three lots of land from the Whiteheads in 1825. In addition, the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church purchased six lots of land, which

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    A Marxist Reading of Native Son

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    The present dominant class ideology is, as it has been since the writing of the United States Constitution, the ideology of the upper-class, Anglo-Saxon male. Obviously, when the framers spoke of equality for all, they meant for all land-owning white men. The words of the Declaration of Independence, also written by upper-class, Anglo-American males, are clear: "life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness" are rights necessary to each human being and should never be taken away. Governments are established

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