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    African American Literature

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    African American Literature Literature is the world ways of recording their insights and perceptions on the human experience. Africa didn’t start with actually writing down their history, they used other forms of literature to preserve their culture and history. They engaged in oral traditions when passing down knowledge of Africa’s past. Africa used myths, fables and proverbs, and riddles as ways of teaching and remembering their cultures historical events. African mythology play a big part in

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    African Americans in Literature

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    Colonialism was when Europe took over most of Africa and Asia, and then Post-Colonialism followed. During Post-Colonialism people from Europe began to question the way European literature talked about people of color (Africans, Asians). This lens allows people to see the racism behind what they are reading, that it be intentional or unintentional. It questions poetic ideas like (darkness = evil) and (light = goodness, purity). It all gives you a different perspective on parts of the book to realize

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    African American literature has expanded and developed over a series of time periods in which the particular writings reflected some aspects of Black lives. What’s most admirable about African American literature is the consistency throughout the periods to convey a message of strength and encouragement for blacks. One of the most important writing periods in literature history is the realism, naturalism, and modernism period which expanded over twenty years from the 1940’s to the 1960’s. Realism

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    innocent African Americans. It has also robbed a whole race of their identities, heritages and cultures. Throughout the myriad of novels, excerpts, poems, videos and other forms of literature that we encountered in this course, it is unmistakable that the African American literary tradition demonstrates that the past (the unbelievable sufferings of African Americans) can never be arrested and forgotten. The many that have perished at the feet of racism are the history of African Americans themselves

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    When thinking about the word African-American literature, to some it’s the soulfulness that flows through the blood of black people. The why the present and past can relate whether there’s a ten-year gap or one hundred years that separate us, well always have a certain connection with the past through the history that we learn from one another. What is African-American literature? Believing that African-American literature can be written by an educated individual who can provide accurate facts about

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    Levels of Literacy in African-American Literature - Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Song of Solomon, and Push Through literacy will come emancipation. So runs a theme throughout the various selections we have read thus far. But emancipation comes in many forms, as does literacy. The various aspects of academic literacy are rather obvious in relation to emancipation, especially when one is confronted with exclusion from membership in the dominant culture. In the various slave narratives

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    heard, African American literature would not stop either. Together they opened the American’s eye to the lives being lived by many African Americans for the first time. Many of these stories, poems, essays, and plays held common themes of having dreams, dreams with which could not be achieved due to the overbearing power of the White man, dreams just like that of Martin Luther King Jr. The theme of racism inhibiting the chance for African Americans to better themselves is common in American literature

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    Before taking African American Literature I never really thought about the impacts that poetry, songs, stories or folktales really had on society. Rap has never been something I enjoyed and reading has never been overly interesting to me, and finding stories that interested me and caught my attention have been difficult. Throughout this class I have learned a lot about the actual influences of African American literature, while also finding stories that were more than interesting to read. Without

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    Ernest Gaines, Walter Mosley, and August Wilson all play a role in defining the African American literature within the larger part of American culture. Each explores themes of inequality within similar time periods. These books travel from the nineteen forties to the nineteen fifties and entail the shared pain of the African American people and their individual struggles in a variety of conditions. Each piece of literature highlights the torment of the white people and oftentimes portrays them as the

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    Who in your life would you find the most valuable? In African American literature writing, a theme that is found throughout is the importance of family. In many of the stories, poems and films we were introduced to, a common theme shared was family, with them either being away from them or how important they are to them. The works that best showed how family was important to either the author or a character were: The Song of Solomon, 12 Years a Slave, The Narrative life of Frederick Douglass and

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    Kenneth Warren’s What Was African American Literature? is a book that manages to completely counter the consensus of what African American Literature is. Warren claims that “African American literature itself constitutes a representational and rhetorical strategy within the domain of a literary practice responsive to conditions that, by and large, no longer obtain.” In other words, Warren goes against the agreement that Jim Crow has not ended as discrimination and segregation is now more covert

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    of all. In the 1940’s, Jim Crow laws were in effect in the South and life for African Americans wasn’t ideal. Political events and protest marches throughout The United States were shut down due to fear of change; although, there were those that used other avenues of ingress into the mainstream to get their voices heard. American Literature was one of those avenues of ingress. There were many stories and

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    When it comes to writing styles, African American literature is a very complex category of writing. It is made up of three main categories. These styles are romantic embrace, realistic appraisal, and shame-faced rejection. Each style illustrates the author’s view of his or her history. European colonialism played a major role in how the writers viewed their past. The extremist categories are shame-faced rejection and romantic embrace. The first class I will discuss is romantic embracement. The authors

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    African American literature has evolved a tremendous amount over the centuries. The core themes have continued to grow with the African Americans and their fight for equality. A core theme throughout the works of African Americans has been freedom, and I believe this theme has evolved from wanting freedom, to getting freedom (yet still being segregated), to fighting for their freedom, to finally acting free and coming into their own. This progression would also be used to describe the evolution of

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    entity in African American literature of the early 20th century. Many of the novels explore the theme of the African American migration and settlement in to the urban livelihoods of the North. Creating complex portraits of the urban landscape many depicting hostile, predatory environments, Through the use of setting “The Street”, “Brown Girl, Brownstones “ and “The Native Son” incorporate an over arching importance of architectural imagery and symbolism infused in the tales of the African American

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    African American Literature Toni Morrisons Essay Black Matters In Black Matters, Toni Morrison discusses "knowledge" and how it seems to take on a Eurocentric standpoint. The "knowledge" she discusses is the traditional literature that is "unshaped by the four-hundred-year-old presence of the first Africans and then African-Americans in the United States" (Morrison 310). Morrison also addresses the treatment of African Americans in current society dealing with "racial discourse" (311), in addition

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    The role of African American literature in recent years has been to illuminate for the modern world the sophistication and beauty inherent in their culture as well as the constant struggle they experience in the oppressive American system. When writers such as Langston Hughes, W.E.B. DuBois and Alice Walker present their material, they manage to convey to a future world the great depth of feeling and meaning their particular culture retained as compared with the culture of their white counterparts

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    even more important role. This essay will look at African American literature from a psychological perspective. From Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs to Zora Neale Hurston's Delia in "Sweat" to James Baldwin's John in Go Tell It On the Mountain, group and individual identity, in conjunction with a high level of self-esteem, are critical factors in determining the successes achieved by individuals and literary characters in the African American literary tradition. Without this sense of group identity

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    think that a gay black man from Harlem named James Baldwin would be able to make it a as a renowned writer among other things. It was the fact that he grew up in such poor conditions that helped him to go on to write some of the greatest African American literature of his time. He used his prowess in writing to help better voice the black community in way never done before. By conducting thorough research, one might be able to recognize how Baldwin was influenced by firsthand experiences with racism

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    Resistance Literature is a kind of literature which “aims to limit, oppose, or reject hegemonic institutions and cosmologies and systems, strategies and acts of domination” (Collins, 147). It is an expression of rebellion for the powerless spirits around the world, and a defiance of hegemony practiced on the oppressed. Resistance literature is a global phenomenon that has emerged out of the political conflict between western imperialism and non-western indigence resistance movements. Besides, the

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