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    The Atrocity of Saul Alinsky's Utilitarian Approach to Communcation Jeremy Bentham, one of the founders of Utilitarianism, believed his philosophy could provide for the “greatest happiness of the greatest number of people”. However benign it may sound, at the heart of Utilitarianism is a cold, teleological process which reduces happiness to a mere commodity. It is even worse that Saul Alinsky would extend this philosophy to a point where the truth becomes relative, justice becomes a tool of

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    Challenges Facing AIDS Activism in America

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    part of the national dialogue. Whereas male homosexuals found themselves in positions of power and wealth in the first decade of the epidemic, this "new face" of AIDS has little in terms of financial and political resources. It is up to other AIDS activists to lend their voice and political weight to advocate for the welfare of these impoverished minorities. Even before AIDS surfaced the US gay male population had experience in grass-roots political activism from the sexual revolution of the 1970s

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    American Civil Liberties Union

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    American Civil Liberties Union Before 1920 the U.S. Supreme Court had never upheld a single free speech claim under the First Amendment. Civil rights activists were thrown into jail for distributing anti-war literature, minorities were suspected of political radicalism, and there were no rights for gays and lesbians, the poor, and many other groups in the United States; segregation was part of our society. These groups of people, citizens of our country suffered the injustice of having no civil

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    Cults and Their Leaders

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    this term. Some groups called "cults" by some critics may consider themselves not to be "cults", but may consider some other groups to be "cults". Although anti-cult activists and scholars did not agree on precise criteria that new religions should meet to be considered "cults," two of the definitions formulated by anti-cult activists are: Cults are groups that often exploit members psychologically and/or financially, typically by making members comply with leadership's demands through certain types

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    The Real Crux of Sino-Tibetan Relations

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    Tibet’s military and foreign policy sphere and leave the other issues to be decided by Tibetans themselves – it seems a settlement is truly likely to take place. Nevertheless, some Tibetan activists continue to protest the Chinese eradication of Tibetan culture since the forced takeover of 1951. These activists accuse China of invading Tibet and thereafter trying to mute the rich traditions of Tibetan culture through the destruction of monasteries, the planned migration of tens of thousands of ethnically

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    the present. Malcolm X’s philosophies, which centered more on blacks accepting themselves, and loving themselves, and creating their own sense of pride, was deemed racist by the media and he was portrayed as militant/violent by the Civil Rights Activists, when in fact Malcolm X’s teachings contain the exact remedy that we “victims of America” (Malcolm X uses this term to distinguish the fact that blacks were not brought to America out of their own volition) need in order to live the best lives in

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    Soldier Suicide as Political Statement

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    Soldier Suicide as Political Statement At least twenty-nine U.S. soldiers stationed in Iraq and Kuwait committed suicide between March 2003 and March 2004. Even the Pentagon considers this an "alarmingly high" suicide rate. It lead the military to commission a morale poll to be completed by Stars & Stripes (August 2003) and to send in a special mental health advisory team to assess the situation. In April 2004, military officials reported the team's conclusion: while the suicide rate for

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    An Analysis of the Legality of Abortion

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    considered an "activist" decision: Second, it [Roe v. Wade]set the tone for how activist the Court would be in our lives. Rather than simply rule for the plaintiff in Roe v. Wade, thereby invalidating the challenged Texas abortion statute, the Court outlined the parameters of a constitutional abortion statute. In other words, the Court drafted a model statute rather than simply striking down the Texas statute. Such judicial involvement in legislative activity is considered to be highly activist because

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    to address the issues dealing with the welfare of children and animals. AHO has its headquarters in Denver, Colorado with regional offices located in Washington D.C. and in Los Angeles. AHO is an activist group whose main purpose for existence is to establish an involvement with animal activists to create a safe secure environment for the well being of both children and animals. The organization a... ... middle of paper ... ...and thier board members consist of prestigious experts who have

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    Derek Jarman’s film Blue

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    rather than visually in the film, to counter retrogressive depictions of people living with HIV. Thus, Jarman’s depiction of the diseased body in Blue is inferred rather than seen.[1] This representation of the body may appear to be at odds with AIDS activist discourse, which has advocated at length for positive images of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA)[2] since the 1980s.[3] However, Derek Jarman’s strategy to challenge and derail the notion of visibility was also aligned with an impulse to visually

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