Free Abu Bakr Essays and Papers

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    The Succession to the Prophet: The Election of Abu Bakr The death of the prophet seemed like a catastrophe to all Muslims at the time, after all who would be able to lead such a big empire with the same values, respect and power after the prophet. It would have been easier if the prophet had just asked someone to lead the way after his death. This paper will discuss the events that lead to the election of Abu Bakr as the first successor of the prophet and one of the four rightly guided caliphs

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    Hazrat Abu Bakr occupies a unique and significant role in the history of Islam. He was the first adult male to accept Islam, and when he first accepted the new faith, he accepted it right away. The Prophet (S) said, “Whenever I offered Islam to any person, he showed some hesitation when embracing it. But Abu Bakr is an exception. He was the prophet’s closest companion. It was Abu Bakr, who traveled with the Prophet (S) to Madinah for the Hijra. When Prophet Muhammad (S), made the hijra from Makkah

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    initial scramble, it was Abu Bakr (r. 632-34 CE) who was named the first Caliph, or Deputy of God, and began to lead the Islamic community. Though his reign as caliph was short, we find it had a great impact on the early development of Islam. Through close examination of his relationship with Muhammad and his actions as caliph, this work will claim that Muhammad greatly influenced Abu Bakr's decision making as a leader and how Islam began to be shaped. To understand Abu Bakr's reign, we first need

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    The Role Of A Abu Bakr

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    A’isha bint Abu Bakr was the third wife of Muhammad and daughter of one of the Prophet’s earliest and strongest followers Abu Bakr, the first caliph in Islamic history who had embraced Islam before she was born. As a scholar, theologian and political activist, A’isha was involved in the development of the tradition, its laws and of its written scriptures. She is given the title as the ‘’Mother of the Believers’’, having no children of her own, A’isha was seen as the symbolic mother- the universal

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    prophet left behind the religion of Islam but also the Muslims organized as an Islamic government. It was the question of who would prosper and lead the Islamic state. Sunnis claim the Prophet selected Abu Bakr to lead salaat (prayer) while in his deathbed, hence proposing the Prophet identified Abu Bakr as the succeeding leader. However the Shias evidence is that Prophet Muhammad stood up in front of his companions on the way from his last pilgrimage (Hajj), and proclaimed Ali as the spiritual guide

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    Muhammad and had left no details as to who should succeed him. Indications were made for Abu bakr to be the first caliph as the prophet Muhammad (pbuh) said ‘If I were to take a friend other than my lord, I would take Abu bakr as a friend’ (hadith). After a heated discussion by the senior members of the community, Abu bakr was selected as the first caliph. However, the confusion did not end with Abu bakr’s accession. Tribes all around Arabia broke out in open revolt, while they continued

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    Muslim committee elected Abu Bakr, as he was the closest companion of the prophet, and so become the first caliphate, also known as ‘The Rightly Guided Caliphs’ because a caliph is someone who truly followed the footsteps of the prophet. Abu Bakr’s first dilemma as a caliph was the dismemberment of the alliances of the following kingdoms ‘Yemen’ and ‘Oman’. Also the false revelations of new prophets seemed to emerge through out of Arabia. To deal with this problem Abu Bakr had no choice but to

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    passages of the Quran. The passages in the Quran are: Whatever is in the heavens and earth exalts Allah , and He is th... ... middle of paper ... ...ts had not been required during the caliphate of Abu Bakr. Umar insisted and, when Khalid refused to comply, reduced him to a junior command under Abu ‘Ubayd. Later, in the same year, it was brought to Umar’s attention that Khalid had made a present or payment of 10,000 dirhams to a poet.

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    Rise Of Islam Dbq

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    The first man, named Abu Bakr, many people believed he was a good candidate because he was an old friend and was one of the first ones to convert to Islam. Yet others believed that Ali Talib was the best choice because he was a cousin and a son in law to the prophet. The disputes between the two groups of people would lead to a split; the followers of Abu Bark became the Sunnis and the followers of Ali became the Shia. At the end, the majority of people decided to choose Abu Bark and he became Islam’s

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    Abu Bakr was chosen as the first caliph, and successor to the Prophet Mohammad. The minority group who was in favor of Ali later becomes known as Shiat Ali, or the partisans of Ali finally got their way. Ali finally became the fourth caliph, only after the murders of the earlier caliphs Abu Bakr the father of Muhammad 's wife A 'isha, Omar another father-in-law of Muhammad, and Othman a son-in-law

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    All popular organized religions have had a profound impact on male-female relationships. Each has a set of rules to be obeyed related to the roles of wives towards husbands and husbands towards wives. All seem to agree that in a marriage the wife must obey her husband. William Shakespeare in his play, The Taming Of The Shrew, explores this concept of obeying one's husband within the husband/wife relationship. The play challenges the current feminine attitude towards the marital vows of "honor

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    obligatory act,a sunnah act,poetry,lineage,history,judgement or medicine better than Aisha [ra]".... (Ibn Qayyim and Ibn Sa 'ad Jala-ul-Afham, Vol. 2, p. 26.) Aisha As Siddiqa, Ummul-Mumineen (mother of the faithful believers) [ra], Bint Abu Bakr Saddiq Abdullah Bin Abi Quhafah [rah] was born in Makkah in the year 614 CE, she was born to a Muslim family, and was a great teacher to both men and women,she showed the world how a woman could be more knowledgeable than men fourteen centuries ago

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    mention that Mohammed’s daughter Fatima disagreed against Abu Bakr as being the new leader of Islam. Fatima felt that her husband Ali Bin Abitalib who is also Mohammed’s cousin and father of his grandchildren should place the leadership after Prophet Mohammed. At that point Shia and Sunni Muslims were separated in different directions. Sunni believed that the legitimate leaders of Islam are the leaders who ruled after Mohammed’s death (Abu Bakr- Umar- Othman- Ali). On the other hand Shia believed that

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    the quran

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    Introduction The Quran is the last testament in a series of divine revelations from God. It consists of the unaltered and direct words of Allah, which were revealed to Muhammad SAW, the final prophet of Islam, through Angel Gabriel more than 1400 years ago. The first revelation was received in the year 610 of what was to become the Quran. It is stated that Muhammad SAW was confronted by the Angel Gabriel while in a cave on Mount Hira in Makkah. The angel commanded him to recite what are the earliest

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    Exploring Muhammad and the Quran

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    Buddha once said, “Just as a candle cannot burn without fire, men cannot live without a spiritual life.” He understood the need that men have for belief in a higher power. This belief transcends all religions and beliefs across the earth. With religion comes a sacred text provided through the words of a prophet. The problem we run into with these texts is that they have the potential to be flawed by historical revision. Every form of religious text can have this problem, including the Quran. This

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    Religious Studies coursework 'Name the features of a specific mosque' A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. Its primary purpose is to serve as a place of worship for practising Muslims where they can pray together. Al-Masjid-Al-Nabawi, also known as the prophet's mosque, is the second holiest mosque in the world and is the final resting place of the prophet Muhammad. The original mosque was built by the prophet himself. The mosque also served as a community centre

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    Sectarianism In Islam

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    reason for the existence of the Shi’a sect is directly related to the election of Abu Bakr as the first caliph of the Muslim community in the year 632. The Prophet had just passed away, and the leaders of Medina gathered to choose a political successor to keep the fledgling Muslim nation united. There was no question about doing this because the Prophet had spoken about it so often. After a heated debate, Abu Bakr was chosen to lead. Ali, the cousin and son-in-law of Muhammad (he was married to Muhammad’s

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    Migration can be defined as a process in which a group moves from one point to another. This paper will talk about the two of those migrations. One which occurred in 1930 by poverty stricken farmers in Oklahoma and the other the migration of Islam’s Prophet Muhammad (also known as Hijrah). Throughout history, every migration had a cause and effect, otherwise known as push/pull factors. Author John Steinbeck's, The Grapes of Wrath, which won the Pulitzer Prize, is about the mass migration occurred

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    Rise Of Islam Essay

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    Fear, instilled into our brains through violence and driven by a leader with a purpose. The rise of Islam is driven by fear, whether it be the fear of damnation through the divine or by the violence others bestow upon us. Gordon says, “History has shown repeatedly that ideas can provide powerful motivation for extraordinary deeds.” (11) Muslims are masters of using this fear/violence to make their religion dominant; Muhammad’s use of violence to spread the Muslim religion, how Muslim diplomacy

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    evidence that suggests it may have been a major piece of political propaganda. The Hadith al-‘ashara says that the Prophet Muhammad predicted paradise for ten companions: Abu Bakr, ‘Umar, ‘Ali, Talha, az-Zubayr, Sa’d b. Abi Waqqas, Sa’id b. Zayd b. Nufayl, Abd ar-Rahman b. Awf, and in conflicting versions, either himself or Abu ‘Ubayda b. al-Jarrah (161). The hadith became prominent shortly after Muhammad’s death, promulgated by both Sa’id b. Zayd b. Nufayl and ‘Abd ar-Rahman b. Awf (160-161). Though

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