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    Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery" Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery" is an excellent example of an allegorical short story. In this story, the reader learns of a town's "lottery" that takes place once a year, every year. It has been a tradition in this small rural town for many years and the villagers never question these activities, they just blindly go along with it. But what the reader doesn't know is just what kind of prize the winner is going to obtain. Jackson's use of symbolism is shown through

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    Shirley Jackson's The Lottery

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    “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson has been criticized, but its longevity and durability prove it stands the test of time. In the article, “Jackson’s The Lottery,” the author A.R. Coulthard finds a deeper meaning in the story which other critics have not. Coulthard believes the story is a “parable of the evil inherent in human nature” rather than “an assault on mindless cultural conformity,” as other critics have suggested (Coulthard 226). Coulthard shows how something that most likely began as a primitive

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    Lotteries are the picture of money for most people. Lotteries are often viewed as a great thing, winning the lottery means winning cash, but in reality a lottery is just a raffle. It is a process ruled by chance. Winning the lottery could be from the best reward to the cruelest one ever. In 1948, Shirley Jackson wrote the short story “The Lottery” to show there is pointless violence and brutality in humans’ lives and how society accepts it. She used the story to show how people will join senseless

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    Shirley Jackson's The Lottery

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    Shirley Jackson is said to be one of the most “brilliant and influential authors of the twentieth century.” “Her fiction writing is some of the most important to come out of the American literary canon.” (http://shirleyjackson.org/Reviews.html) Jackson wrote many short stories and even some books. They are more on the dark, witchlike side, however. Kelleher explains that Jackson stated in some interviews that she practiced magic. No one really knows if she was serious while practicing witchcraft

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    blindly follow a tradition it is bad. In Shirley Jackson’s The Lottery, the townspeople follow the tradition of having the lottery, without really knowing why. The Lottery conveys the theme that, following traditions can be beneficial, but when people follow traditions because they are afraid of change it can be harmful, through imagery, dialogue, symbolism, and irony. Jackson uses imagery a lot to convey her theme in The Lottery. While conducting the lottery Mr. Summers uses a black box to put all

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    Shirley Jackson's 'The Lottery' The setting in a story helps to form the story and it makes the characters become more interesting. There are three main types of setting. The first is nature and the outdoors, second is objects of human manufacture and construction and the third is cultural conditions and assumptions. These three things help the reader to understand the characters better in Shirley Jackson's 'The Lottery';. 'The Lottery'; is started out by being described as 'The morning of

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    Shirley Jackson's The Lottery

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    at anytime and the most ordinary people can commit them. Jackson's fiction is noted for exploring incongruities in everyday life, and “The Lottery”, perhaps her most exemplary work in this respect, examines humanity's capacity for evil within a contemporary, familiar, American setting. Noting that the story’s characters, physical environment, and even its climactic action lacks significant individuating detail, most critics view “The Lottery.” As a modern-day parable or fable, which obliquely addresses

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    Shirley Jackson's The Lottery

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    it seems in Shirley Jackson’s short story “The Lottery”. Within the story there are many reoccurring themes, ranging from the townspeople inability to establish bonds to the Jackson’s displaying how easily humans will engage in behavior that is otherwise frowned upon once given an excuse. The most prominent of these themes is the loyalty the townspeople hold towards various items and rituals in their lives. The townspeople hold the utmost loyalty towards their tradition of the lottery. The second

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    “The Lottery” depicts an eternal tradition, practiced by villagers, of selecting one member of a family to be murdered. In Shirley Jackson’s riveting short story “The Lottery”, Jackson creates a community that’s rich in tradition, yet lacks historical evidence, making the village’s annual lottery an event to attend. Over the course of the short story, the narrator hints at the apparent discourse of camaraderie for the lottery and as a result the tradition became purposeless. In “The Lottery” by Shirley

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    or a lottery prize. At first it seems harmless, but then we started to notice that something is weird with all those laughter contained people, and with the piles of stones. If the Lottery is an allegory of the community, its rules and procedures in any way should correspond with the actual elements of a provincial society; if Jackson was willing, in meticulous manner, to give them names very symbolic to so many people, then we must assume that it is just as careful when developing the lottery as an

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    Foreshadowing in Shirley Jackson's The Lottery "The Lottery," a short story written by Shirley Jackson, is a tale about a disturbing social practice.  The setting takes place in a small village consisting of about three hundred denizens.  On June twenty-seventh of every year, the members of this traditional community hold a village-wide lottery in which everyone is expected to participate.  Throughout the story, the reader gets an odd feeling regarding the residents and their annual practice

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    Analysis of Shirley Jackson's The Lottery

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    Shirley Jackson’s famous short story, “The Lottery,” was published in 1948 and remains to this day one of the most enduring and affecting American works in the literary canon. “The Lottery” tells the story of a farming community that holds a ritualistic lottery among its citizens each year. Although the text initially presents audiences with a close-knit community participating in a social event together on a special day, the shocking twist at the work’s end—with the death of the lottery’s “winner”

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    Shirley Jackson's The Lottery

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    “The less there is to justify a traditional custom, the harder it is to get rid of it” (Twain). The Lottery begins during the summer. A small, seemingly normal, town is gathering to throw the annual “Lottery”. In the end, the townspeople—children included—gather around and stone the winner to death, simply because it was tradition. The story reveals how traditions can become outdated and ineffective. “I suppose, I hoped, by setting a particularly brutal ancient rite in the present and in my own village

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    are anywhere near as violent as the one seen in “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson. In “The Lottery” the folks of a small anonymous town practice a tradition because they believe it helps their crops grow better, as hinted at in the story by Old Man Warner. The tradition is a lottery in which one unlucky person can pull out a slip of paper with a black dot on it. This person is then encircled by the other townsfolk and stoned to death. The lottery brings up an interesting question about a societies

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    scapegoat for reasons unknown are both explored in Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery.” Jackson opens up the seemingly normal narrative with some details pertaining to the complexities of the lottery. It’s states of how the setting of the story is so small that the lottery is completed in a little under 3 hours due to the small size of the town. Next the narrative displays social circles amongst the generations, the kids gather rocks for the lottery, men discussing farm tactics and business, and the

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    Analysis of Shirley Jackson's The Lottery

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    “The Lottery” is a short story by Shirley Jackson, first published on June 26, 1948. The story was initially met with negative critical reception due to its violent nature and portrayal of the potentially dangerous nature of human society. It was even banned in some countries. However, “The Lottery” is now widely accepted as a classic American short story and is used in classrooms throughout the country. Jackson’s story takes a critical look at what can result when the customs and laws that govern

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    In Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery,” the theme of the story is dramatically illustrated by Jackson’s unique tone. Once a year the villagers gather together in the central square for the lottery. The villagers await the arrival of Mr. Summers and the black box. Within the black box are folded slips of paper, one piece having a black dot on it. All the villagers then draw a piece of paper out of the box. Whoever gets the paper with the black dot wins. Tessie Hutchinson wins the lottery! Everyone then

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    Shirley Jackson's Symbolism in The Lottery

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    Shirley Jackson's Symbolism in The Lottery Shirley Jackson's 'The Lottery', is a story that is filled with symbolism. The author uses symbolism to help her represent human nature as tainted, no matter how pure one thinks of himself or herself, or how pure their environment may seem to be. The story is very effective in raising many questions about the pointless nature of humanity regarding tradition and violence. 'The Lottery' clearly expresses Jackson's feelings concerning mankind?s evil nature

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    The Use of Irony in “The Lottery” In many stories, the author describes the setting of where the events take place so the reader can visualize the surroundings and the people. It is a way to make the reader feel as if they are really there and as if they know the characters. “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson, is a tale in which the reader is deceitfully led to believe there will be a positive outcome. The title “The Lottery”, fraudulently leads the reader to believe the story will end with someone

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    Senseless Why is it that a certain custom is loosely passed down from previous generations? We, as human beings, all have a specific routine or ritual that is dearly valued to us, but the reasoning to others is far misunderstood. In Shirley Jackson’s short story “The Lottery,” she exhilarates how admirable, modest people can execute such a cruel, immoral action due to the blind acceptance of traditions. Jackson brilliantly illustrates the use of an abundant amount of literary devices to fabricate such

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