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    The Role of Nick Carraway as Narrator of The Great Gatsby In The Great Gatsby F. Scott Fitzgerald presents a specific portrait of American society during the roaring twenties and tells the story of a man who rises from the gutter to great riches. This man, Jay Gatsby, does not realize that his new wealth cannot give him the privileges of class and status. Nick Carraway who is from a prominent mid-western family tells the story. Nick presents himself as a reliable narrator, when actually several

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    because Nick Carraway—a friend of Mr. Gatsby—never supplies a clear point on the matter. His position as narrator of The Great Gatsby reveals Fitzgerald’s intention of projecting the mythical and dream-like nature of Mr. Gatsby. Gatsby lives the dream—money, status and the woman of his dreams—while the highly relatable Nick exists in the shadows of this man—without a dream. As told in this first-person narrative, the entire story and its events are filtered through the lens of the fallible Nick, and

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    The Great Gatsby

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    agree that choosing the correct point of view is critical in developing the plot and character of any piece of writing. Quite simply, point of view can be described as the role of the narrator in the story; is the person telling the story as a detached observer, or is he or she actually involved in the events? A narrator who is not involved in the plot may be placed into one of two categories, the first being third person, while the second category is known as omniscient narration. Third person narration

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    The Importance of Nick Carraway as Narrator of The Great Gatsby In The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald critiques the disillusionment of the American Dream by contrasting the corruption of those who adopt a superficial lifestyle with the honesty of Nick Carraway. As Carraway familiarizes himself with the lives of Tom and Daisy Buchanan, Jordan Baker and Jay Gatsby, he realizes the false seductiveness of the New York lifestyle and regains respect for the Midwest he left behind. "Fitzgerald needs an objective

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    Dara Desrosiers Section: 111 March, 3, 2015 Is Nick a Reliable Narrator????? Two writers wrote their analysis that suggested their opinions on Nick’s reliability. One of them agreed that Nick was a reliable narrator and the other one disagreed. I speculate that the first writer who agreed that Nick is a reliable character wrote a well-structured analysis. The first writer’s evidences were well connected and supported the writer’s claims. The writer made great use of cohesive words that formerly

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    Fitzgerald wrote The Great Gatsby from the first-person point of view of Nick Carraway. His life story primarily focuses on his relationship with Gatsby, including Gatsby’s connections and relationships with other people. Nick is considered to be an unreliable narrator due to the fact that, “[He] does not understand the full import of a situation ... [and he] makes incorrect conclusions and assumptions about events witnessed” (“Narrator”). Nick’s standpoint contributes to the effectiveness of the book which

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    view of Nick Carraway. His life story primarily focuses on his relationship with Gatsby, including Gatsby’s connections and relationships with other people. Nick is considered to be an unreliable narrator due to the fact that, “[He] does not understand the full import of a situation ... [and he] makes incorrect conclusions and assumptions about events witnessed” (“Narrator”). Nick’s standpoint contributes to the effectiveness of the book which leads to an enhancement

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    Gender Issues in The Great Gatsby

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    reflected through characters such as Daisy Buchanan and Myrtle Wilson, male characters such as Tom Buchanan and George Wilson appear to represent the traditional man, thus satisfying the ideal gender roles of a male-dominant society. Though it appears that Nick Carraway’s admiration for masculinity allows him to suffer from his potential anxieties about his own masculinity, Carraway’s male chauvinistic mentality is certain because of his enforcement of traditional gender roles that exerts dominance over women

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    The evolving character of an interactive narrator can help discern key themes in a novel. F. Scott Fitzgerald's social examination of life in America's Jazz Age relies heavily on Nick Carraway, the narrator, acting as a 'Trojan horse' for Fitzgerald to smuggle his own ideologies into The Great Gatsby. Fitzgerald endorses realist class relations as power relations over the romantic and archaic 'Jeffersonian dream of simple agrarian value'. He also favours the view that the American upper class's 'carpe

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    The Great Gatsby analysis In this essay I will first write about the writer, the plot and compare some scenes. Secondly I will write about the setting, and short about Fitzgerald’s delay of information. Then I will discuss the characters, the point of view and compare the book to the two movies. Finally I will point out a few literary devices and what I think the theme is. Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald is an American author, and his biggest work is The Great Gatsby, which was published in 1925. Fitzgerald

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