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Free 2001 anthrax attacks Essays and Papers

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    United States Anthrax Attacks of 2001

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    In 2001 the United States suffered a major terrorist attack on 9/11. A week later a new attack started, the anthrax attacks. The attacks occurred over a span of weeks. Anthrax is a type of bacteria that produces spores, which can kill people very rapidly if infected. It is not always easy to diagnose due to its nonspecific symptoms. In this case it was used as biological weapon. The attacks were not known about for a period of time until multiple cases occurred. Many people and organizations

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    The most devastating result of the 2001 anthrax attacks is the lack of consequences for those persons responsible. There has not been enough evidence discovered or presented by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, or FBI, to adequately declare exactly who is responsible for the anthrax attacks. Regardless, there has been great speculation around a man named Steven Hatfill, and a large portion of the American society has placed the blame for the attacks on his shoulders. By dispelling contradictory

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    Anthrax Laced Letters

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    Shortly after the attacks on the World Trade Center September 11, 2001 there began a rash of Anthrax laced letters being sent through the United States Postal System. This form of Anthrax was sent as spores known as Bacillus Anthracis, the type of bacterium that causes Anthrax. This terrorist style act resulted in 22 cases of disease and 5 deaths (Walsh, Skane 2011). Anthrax is an extremely life threatening disease. It is a hard working and thorough bacterium. This bacterium becomes dormant and

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    Bioterrorist Attack in the United Sates

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    ignore. Shortly following the infamous 9/11 attacks, anthrax claimed five lives around the nation, but people do not live in fear of bioterrorism. The probability of another terrorist attack before the end of 2013, as explained by Mark d’Agostino and Greg Martin in “The Bioscience Revolution,” is high and most likely to come in the form of bioterrorism due to its relatively low production cost and availability (1). Due to the likelihood of such an attack, the need for good biodefense mechanisms is

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    Anthrax

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    Anthrax Bacillus Anthraces, commonly known as Anthrax, is a bacterial infectious disease involving the skin, lungs, and gastrointestinal track in its host. Anthrax affects humans and animals, usually resulting in death. This bacteria is passed to humans through contact with infected animals or the products produced by infected animals. Anthrax originates in the soil as spores, which can live up to 48 years, and is transmitted to animals who graze or live on farmlands and on any infected areas

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    Anthrax and Bioterrorism

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    According to Willey, Sherwood, and Woolverton, anthrax is a highly infectious animal disease, caused by the bacterium B. antrhacis, that can be transmitted to humans by direct contact with infected animals, such as cattle, goats, sheep, etc., or their products, especially hides, and its spores can remain viable in soil and animal products for decades. Therefore, it is more likely to be transmitted to those humans continuously in contact with such animals or areas in which infected animals have had

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    Bioterrorism in the United States

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    the naked eye? Up until the early 2000’s, we knew how to tackle crime. If someone stole something, we would find them and lock them up or take other disciplinary action. Now, in case of war, we performed in a similar fashion. If a state were to attack us in some form, we would typically counter back with some defense measure attempting to correct the problem. Now, stop and think what we would do as a nation if a person or a group of people sent around something that truly hurt people, but yet

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    Through the years we have experienced our own scares of bioterrorism where we have not been as prepared as we should. These acts of terrorism at The Dalles Taco Time in 1984 and the anthrax in envelopes in 2001 have increased the precautions we take to decrease our risk of bioterrorism attacks. These severity of these attacks also depends on the agents used. Depending on the category the biological agent falls in the more or less severe the outcomes may be for those effected. Bioterrorism is a silent

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    Preventing Terrorist Attacks

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    Weapons of Mass Destruction After the success of the September 11th attacks, al-Qaeda stepped up their rhetoric and began to specifically discuss the desire to acquire and use Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD's) against targets within the United States (Howard & Forest, 2013). In a letter addressed to the U.S. State Department, al-Qaeda leader Abu Musab al Suri, notes that WMD's are the great equalizer between the much smaller al-Qaeda and the U.S., which will allow them to eventually prevail

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    It has not helped that the government has been unable to answer basic questions. Is it safe to open mail? Is the anthrax of domestic or foreign origin? How many letters were contaminated? Who sent them? Immediate answers to all these questions are hard. But that's precisely why the first lesson for the new era is to trust the people with the truth as far as it is known. Anthrax may not be contagious, but fear is, and the key to avoiding panic is to shun spin control. If fear of alarming people

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