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    1984 Argument

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    George Orwell’s book, “1984,” has influenced its’ readers from the time it was written even until now. The book has presented a future different from that of the scientific future of flying cars and hovercrafts that society has presented to us. Instead, it tells of rotten political future. Today some people refer to our society as “Orwellian”. They believe Orwell’s story is realistic and compares to our present society. However, there are many people that believe “1984” is satirical nonsense

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    Analysis Of 1984

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    Analysis of 1984 In 1949, an Englishman named Eric Blair published the novel 1984. Under the pseudonym, George Orwell, this author became one of the most respected and notable political writers for his time. 1984 was Orwell’s prophetic vision of the world to come. This creation of “Negative Utopia” was thoroughly convincing through Orwell’s use of setting and characterization. The theme conveyed by Orwell is that no matter how strong an individual a communist society would destroy any hope that

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    1984 Essay

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    Rousseau, a famous philosopher, once said “I prefer liberty with danger than peace with slavery.” What Rousseau means by this is that it is better to have fought for your freedom than to peacefully allow yourself to become a slave. In George Orwell’s 1984, a man name Winston Smith struggles with a society that has allowed itself to become enslaved by it’s totalitarian government, whose leader is known as “Big Brother”. Big Brother has convinced his people that to truly be safe, they must be monitored

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    lied to. This is particularly true and omniscient in the book 1984. The plot takes place in Oceania, and there is no privacy. The Party knows exactly what you say and do. The Party uses propaganda to make everyone believe what the Party wants them to believe. The term “alternative facts” has been used recently and it bears strong similarity to the principles

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    Thoughtcrime In 1984

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    Summary: In George Orwell’s novel 1984, the main character, Winston Smith, finds himself in the superstate of Oceania which is controlled by the Party and the Thought Police. Although a member of the Party, Winston harbors a hate for the Party’s leader, Big Brother, along with the telescreens, the Thought Police, and the Party overall. In Oceania, members of the Party are to feel love, admiration, hope, and thanks towards Big Brother only. Many people vanish from existence without explanation and

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    1984 Dystopian

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    With books such as The Hunger Games, The Maze Runner, and The Divergent Series, Dystopian themed novels and movies have become increasingly more popular recently in pop culture. George Orwell was therefore ahead of the game when he wrote 1984 in 1949, and it is still up to par with all of the recent dystopian books. This genre has gained popularity partly due to the rising paranoia that governments are becoming too powerful, and we as a society will soon be living in a totalitarian society. With

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    Exclusivity In 1984

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    Apart from a few, humans have always followed the crowd as it is harder to go against several people for their own beliefs. In the prose, 1984 written by George Orwell the fear of being judged, the bandwagon effect, and having the privilege to exclusivity demonstrate that this novel is a commentary on society. Throughout the passage, Orwell displays the fear of being judged through the character O’Brian. When Winston makes eye contact with O’Brian, “O’Brian seemed to be saying […] ‘I am on your

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    Freedom In 1984

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    Who likes to be watched? “Until they become conscious they will never rebel, and until after they rebelled they cannot become conscious.” The party in 1984 is a system of spies who control everything in Oceania. Winston rebels for his desires. Julia rebels for her pleasure. O’brien rebels to gain trust and then betray. In George Orwell's book, 1984, he shows the importance of freedom, the pain of being controlled, and the hurt from being betrayed. The party is watching every move that

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    1984 Analysis

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    concept about the future is that it will always remain a mystery. The future is always changing and never ending. In George Orwell’s 1984, Orwell ruminates on his thoughts and ideas of what the future will be like. Orwell wrote the book around 1950 during the writing era of postmodernism. Postmodernist books often expressed thoughts of the future, as well as other themes. 1984 describes the future as a place where the Party has taken over and controls everything and everyone. The residents of Oceania have

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    1984 Betrayal

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    1984 In the novel 1984 by George Orwell, betrayal is the central theme throughout the entire story. Betrayal is the act of committing treachery or disloyalty to uncover someone or something’s true feelings. Essentially, the government of the Oceania civilization, the main setting in 1984, is ruled in a totalitarian society, which causes betrayal to arise between the government and the citizens of Oceania. A totalitarian society is a society ruled by a government that does not allow their citizens

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    Totalitarianism In 1984

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    The awareness of a dictatorial style of government is emphasized in the book 1984, in which Orwell warns the human race about the potentially devastating impact a sole authority can have on a population. The ruler will not only take control over all individuals who are inferior, but will also change the past history of society and force the individuals to accept the alterations. This idea of having one power reigning supreme, also known as totalitarianism, is presented through the depiction of characters

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    1984 Argument

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    The novel 1984 by George Orwell can be viewed as prophetic or, at the very least, a logical extension of some governments’ control in Orwell’s time. The story is about a middle class man, Winston Smith is a low-ranking member of a ruling Party in London, Oceania. Everywhere, even in individual homes, the Party watches its people through telescreens; a television with a camera inside. Everywhere he looks he sees the face of Big Brother, the Party’s omniscient leader. The Party controls everything

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    Identity in 1984

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    Identity, in today’s society, is often taken for granted. We have the ability to be anything we wish to be and act in any way we wish to act, but in the novel 1984 by George Orwell, identity is not taken for granted because it does not exist at all. Winston Smith, the narrator, lives in a dystopian society based on the idea of totalitarian government rule. This government is known as Big Brother. In order for Big Brother to stay in power, a few things are necessary: identity cannot exist; everything

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    1984 Politics

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    In the novel 1984, this idea is captured in the reference of newspeak and oldspeak. Oldspeak is a reference to what we would consider normal use of language. Sentences to say one idea and emotion are two characteristics of oldspeak. Newspeak was created as a way to

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    Technology In 1984

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    of the danger technology might cause in the future if it landed in the wrong hands. In this paper, I will be exploring how the world of technology mimics that of Winston’s world and how “privacy” has lost its meaning due to technology just like in 1984 but the biggest issue I will research is why do we allow it the government to monitor our

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    Totalitarianism In 1984

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    George Orwell’s 1984 depicts life the way that George Orwell predicted it would be, based on his personal experiences, if the world continued to have war and corrupt governments. Orwell was a strong believer in socialism as an idea yet he knew that it would struggle to work as an actual form of government. In 1984 he shows both the pros and cons to socialism and how it can turn into totalitarianism. One of the main concepts that Orwell expresses in 1984 is that total power in the hands of any

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    Comparison Of 1984 By George Orwell To The Actual 1984 Since the onset of the United States, Americans have always viewed the future in two ways; one, as the perfect society with a perfect government, or two, as a communistic hell where free will no longer exists and no one is happy. The novel 1984 by George Orwell is a combination of both theories. On the "bad" side, a communist state exists which is enforced with surveillance technology and loyal patriots. On the "good" side, however, everyone

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    Totalitarianism In 1984

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    States and that is only in one week! (Popular Science) With cameras in every Americans Public School surveillance starts in childhood and ends at death. How is this different from 1984? In this Orwellian, draconian depiction of the future, totalitarian regimes have taken over the world and divided it into 3 segments. 1984 takes place in Oceania which would be the North American segment. In this novel, much like Animal Farm, Orwell paints a terrifying version of the world with the

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    Nomophobia In 1984

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    policies have been placed to prevent invasion of privacy, current technology is bringing us closer to the world of 1984. Phones are trackers, security cameras can be found almost everywhere, and Congress passed the Patriot Act allowing for investigation of private information without a court order. Technology is truly bringing us frightfully close to the dystopia of George Orwell’s 1984. With our technology,

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    1984...In 2012

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    tradition due to how the content of the novel is so closely related to many things in today’s society. Young people and older people, just alike, should continue reading about the technology, government and war, and language of Oceania in the year, 1984 because the issues that were written as fiction are now becoming a reality for the United States today. In the nineteen-forties and fifties when television was still new technology for a lot of people in the world, the telescreens in Orwell’s novel

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