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    Analysis of William Wordsworth's Poem We Are Seven William Wordsworth’s poem, We are Seven, is about a person talking to a young girl about her and her six siblings. Throughout the poem, the narrator gave the young girl a very difficult time when she persisted that simply because not all seven children were home together, or alive, they were still seven. The narrator was giving the young girl a hard time because he wanted her to remember and understand that just because she and her siblings

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    experiences and travels. Wordsworth recognizes the connections nature enables humans to construct. The beauty of a “wild secluded scene” (Wordsworth, 1798, line 6) allows the mind to bypass clouded and obscured thinking accompanied with man made environments. “In which the heavy and the weary weight of all this unintelligible world, is lightened,” (Wordsworth, 1798, lines 40-43). Wordsworth observes the clear and comprehensive mindset conceived when individuals are exposed to nature. Wordsworth construes

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    Nature has been a major theme for poets for centuries. However, it came an even more prominent theme in the Romantic era. Not only do the poems focus on the natural world, but also human nature. A poet who does this the most is William Wordsworth. Wordsworth’s images and metaphors mix natural scenery, religious symbolism and the images of his own rustic and nature filled childhood and other places perfectly humanity and nature. Wordsworth’s poem “Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey” highlights

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    Wordsworth to acts of kindness and love. Likewise, Wordsworth is influenced from the natural surroundings of Tintern Abbey. Bloom said, "The poet loves nature for its own sake alone, and the presence of nature gives beauty to the poets mind…" (Bloom Poetry 409). Nature inspires Wordsworth poetically. Nature gives a landscape of seclusion that implies a deepening of the mood of seclusion in Wordsworth's mind. This helps Wordsworth become inspired in his writings while at the same time he is inspired

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    On a Quest for the Sublime through Nature Samuel Coleridge and William Wordsworth are both fine romantic poets who express their inner connection with nature in a way that alters their life in a substantial way. In both Samuel Coleridge’s, “Frost at Midnight” and William Wordsworth’s, “Tintern Abbey”, one can determine that both poets use descriptive imagery to alter the readers’ visual sense. The similarities are found in the structure in which both poets write. Both Coleridge and Wordsworth lament

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    Born in 1770 at Cockermouth in the heart of the Lakes District in England. William Wordsworth grew up in a rustic society and his beautiful and ageless poetry often reflect this. Wordsworth’s mother died in 1778 and in 1779 he was sent to grammar school in Hawkshead. Wordsworth’s father died in 1783, leaving his uncles as guardians. They tried to guide him towards a career in law or in the church and he was accepted into Cambridge in 1787. Wordsworth was uninspired to work towards a career he had

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    Essay On Romanticism

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    belief in the story telling ability of the common, uneducated man was formed. The folk tradition focused on simplistic and natural aspects of life, with the stories being passed down to generations orally. Thus, the art and literature, especially poetry of the era contained vivid descriptions of nature and were focused on the lives of common man rather than the aristocracy. This was also the period nationalistic movements in various parts of Europe, owing to the many civil wars and revolutions. People

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    Dialogue and Monologue in the 1798 Lyrical Ballads Commemorating the bicentennial of the 1798 Lyrical Ballads implies something about the volume's innovations as well as its continuity. It is no longer possible to believe that 'Romanticism' started here (as I at least was taught in school). Even if we cannot claim 1798 as a hinge in literary history, though, there is something appealing about celebrating the volume's attitude to newness, as well as the less contentious fact of its enduring importance

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    397. [BACK] 12. Duncan Wu and David Miall, eds. Romanticism: An Anthology, with CD-ROM, 2nd ed. Oxford & Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2000. ( 271). [BACK] 13. Ibid, 191. [BACK] 14. Ibid. [BACK] 15. Wordsworth, "There is an active principle" (1798), 9-11. [BACK] 16. Coleridge, quoted in Peterfreund, Stuart. "Coleridge and the Politics of Critical Vision." Critical Essays on Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Ed. Leonard Orr. New York, Toronto: Maxwell Macmillan International, 1994, 39. [BACK] 17

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    Early life and education Wordsworth was born in Cumberland—part of the scenic region in northwest England called the Lake District. His sister was the poet and diarist Dorothy Wordsworth. With the death of his mother in 1778, his father sent him to Hawkshead Grammar School. In 1783 his father, who was a lawyer and the solicitor for the Earl of Lonsdale (a man much despised in the area), died. The estate consisted of around £4500[citation needed], most of it in claims upon the Earl, who thwarted

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