Essay on To Kill a Mockingbird vs. A Time to Kill

Essay on To Kill a Mockingbird vs. A Time to Kill

Length: 1133 words (3.2 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Strong Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview


Ever since human existence started there have been laws. From Adam and Eve to Moses and the Ten Commandments, there has always been a higher authority that people needed to deal with. In the movies To Kill A Mockingbird and A Time To Kill, people had to deal with a higher authority because of their actions. In To Kill A Mockingbird, Tom Robinson had to deal with a rape charge, and in A Time To Kill, Carl Lee had a murder charge against him. Many different factors affected the outcome of both cases, and ultimately both outcomes were wrong. One was found guilty, and one was not, but both had to deal with the prejudice of being black and the stereotypes of the era.

In both A Time To Kill and To Kill A Mockingbird both of the men accused were of the African American descent and found Caucasian man to defend them. In A Time To Kill, Carl Lee was accused of murdering two white men who raped and assaulted his daughter. His daughter was abducted and raped partially because of her race, but Mr. Lee’s lawyer, Mr. Jake Brigance, never played up the Lee’s race. In fact Brigance never even mentioned race, and if he did he never made it a major point. In the summation Brigance blamed himself for his inexperience, and the fact that one of his witnesses was not credible. Carl Lee’s lawyer ask for equality, and plays on the juries emotions and feelings, which Atticus Finch also does in To Kill A Mockingbird. Tom Robinson was accused of raping a white girl who came from a poorer family of the community, and his lawyer was a prominent man from the same community, Atticus Finch. In Tom Robinson’s trial, it is very apparent that he is an African American man. Mr. Finch does not need to mention that he is an African American man, yet he still do...


... middle of paper ...


... the defendants had to deal with a higher human authority, the judge and jury of their area. In To Kill A Mockingbird Tom Robinson had to deal with an alleged rape, and no matter what the evidence said, or how hard his lawyer worked, he was convicted and later died. Tom was falsely accused, and his death was untimely and could have been avoided. But he accepted his fate calmly, as if he knew no matter what he would be convicted. The defendant in A Time To Kill, Carl Lee was accused of murder of the two men who raped his daughter. Carl was found not guilty, even though he did kill those men, and later on in life will have to deal with his actions. Both men had to deal with what the court brought against them, and they both did. Carl and Tom dealt with multiple issues, but the prejudices of their race, and the time they were tried ultimately determined their fates.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Essay on To Kill a Mockingbird vs. A Time to Kill

- Ever since human existence started there have been laws. From Adam and Eve to Moses and the Ten Commandments, there has always been a higher authority that people needed to deal with. In the movies To Kill A Mockingbird and A Time To Kill, people had to deal with a higher authority because of their actions. In To Kill A Mockingbird, Tom Robinson had to deal with a rape charge, and in A Time To Kill, Carl Lee had a murder charge against him. Many different factors affected the outcome of both cases, and ultimately both outcomes were wrong....   [tags: Comparative Essay]

Strong Essays
1133 words (3.2 pages)

To Kill a Mockingbird and A Time to Kill: Similarities and Differences Essay

- A Time to Kill and To Kill a Mockingbird both have a number of similarities to be compared and contrasted. Both stories can be compared in their themes about justice and racial prejudice. However, this is where the similarities end. The themes and ideas in both novels are vastly different in shape and scope. In A Time to Kill justice is the main theme and most of the ideas are focused on justice and the gray in between the lines of black and white set by the law, racial prejudice is also touched upon very frequently in the comparisons between Jake Brigance and Carl Lee Hailey and how he wouldn't even have had to face trial if he was a white man....   [tags: John Grisham, Harper Lee, contrast & comparison]

Strong Essays
824 words (2.4 pages)

Ahead of Her Time: Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird Essays

- The novel To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee is thought to have been way ahead of her time of literature and went places were books of that time did not go, and still do not go. Lee went head at the lifestyle of the 1930’s in Alabama, and talked about racism and prejudice as many others stayed away from that topic. In the novel there were many different times where Lee brought out the dark side of the “dirty thirties” she shows prejudice and racism at its worst moments. Lee has her main characters of Jem Finch, and Scout Finch experience prejudice and racism as the book goes on and mainly in the second part....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]

Strong Essays
915 words (2.6 pages)

Comparing the Movies A Time to Kill, by John Grisham and To Kill a Mockingbird

- The movie based on John Grisham's A Time to Kill is a Hollywoodized, modern-day version of To Kill a Mockingbird. Both movies employ many of the same themes and plot elements; but the former movie is one-dimensional and predictable while the latter is innovative and purposeful. The movie version of Harper Lee's novel To Kill a Mockingbird is considered a classic film, whereas John Grisham?s adapted novel is merely another example of the money making efforts of Hollywood. Some of the movies' more prominent themes are the same....   [tags: John Grisham]

Strong Essays
1297 words (3.7 pages)

Essay on The Mockingbirds in To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee

- Walt Whitman’s 1859 poem “Out of the Cradle Rocking Endlessly” depicts the mockingbird as a symbol of innocence that chants or sings of fond memories from the past. By contrast, Harper Lee’s famous novel To Kill a Mockingbird, published in 1960, written almost a century after Whitman’s poem, portrays the mockingbird as innocent but as a fragile creature with horrific memories – memories of discrimination, isolation, and violence. Harper Lee wrote her novel, which is rooted in the fictional town of Maycomb, Alabama, in the Deep South, during a time of segregation and discrimination, social issues which can be seen not only in the novel but were witnessed by Harper Lee in her own life....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]

Strong Essays
1988 words (5.7 pages)

Use of Symbols in To Kill a Mockingbird Essay

- To Kill a Mockingbird was written by Harper Lee, the novel was published in 1960. The novel was written in a time of racial inequality in the United States. To Kill a Mockingbird is told in the perspective of a young girl named Scout, in the late 1920s and early 1930s, who is naïve and innocent. Scout matures throughout the novel through her father, Atticus, and she becomes more aware of the prejudice in Maycomb County. When Atticus loses his case, Scout and her brother, Jem, learn that blacks cannot have a fair trial, but their new found maturity has taught them not assume someone’s character without knowing them first, such as with Boo Radley....   [tags: Symbolism in To Kill a Mockingbird]

Strong Essays
2301 words (6.6 pages)

The Theme of Racism in To Kill a Mockingbird Essay

- One of the widely recognized controversies in American history is the 1930s, which housed the Great Depression and the post-civil war, the ruling of Plessy versus Ferguson and the Jim Crow Laws, and segregation. While textbooks detail the factual aspect of the time there is only one other literature that can exhibit the emotion experienced in the era. To Kill a Mockingbird is the acclaimed novel that displays the experiences of the South, through inequality and segregation, social class differences and the right to fairness....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]

Strong Essays
2121 words (6.1 pages)

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee Essay

- Harper Lee has incorporated the representation of her most meaningful statement in the title of her novel, To Kill A Mockingbird. The many points of discussion which surface in Lee's book would certainly have partially submerged the parallel she created between Tom Robinson and the mockingbird. In any classic novel such as To Kill A Mockingbird, the myriad differences in thinking between readers allow for many different interpretations. The author of such a work, however, must constantly make decisions concerning the best ways to fulfill his or her purpose in writing; Harper Lee decided that the symbol of the mockingbird was not displayed prominently enough, and so made it the crux of her n...   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]

Strong Essays
630 words (1.8 pages)

Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird Essay

- Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird To Kill a Mockingbird, both as a novel and as a film, shows how time can change the way society views the importance of certain issues, such as racism. Because it was written during the civil rights movement, many people protested against it for conveying issues of prejudice between the north and the south. However, after time, the novel gradually became accepted. It is now a world-renowned classic, and it has won the Pulitzer Prize, as well as having made its way to the big screen....   [tags: To Kill a Mockingbird Essays]

Strong Essays
3438 words (9.8 pages)

Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird Essay

- Would you rather read a boring novel that contains static characters or would you want to read one that takes you on a journey through a dynamic character's life. In the novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, Scout's personality greatly changes as she matures and learns more about life. This novel takes place in the 1930's in a typical southern society. Once Atticus chooses to defend Tom Robinson, a black man, Scout faces many challenges and she discovers numerous facts about life. Throughout the novel To Kill a Mockingbird Scout grows up and learns that one should not be prejudiced toward others, the true meaning of courage, and that it is wrong to harm the innocent and kind....   [tags: Harper Lee Kill Mockingbird]

Free Essays
1137 words (3.2 pages)