Essay on Thomas Paine 's The American Crisis

Essay on Thomas Paine 's The American Crisis

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Thomas Paine’s objective in “The American Crisis” is to persuade Americans to untie and take action in ridding America of British control; his writings effectiveness is due primarily to his employment of religious diction, vivid imagery, a sentimental anecdote, an urgent tone, as well as his consistent exploitation of his audiences’ emotions.

In an effort to convince his audience to support Americas goal of getting rid of British control, Paine utilizes a great deal of holy diction, granting him the ability to relate to his fellow Americans. As a result of relating to his Audience through diction, Paine is capable of persuading the rest of America into agreeing with his call to action. He writes: “Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered, ” introducing his philosophy that America 's duty now is to conquer the tyranny of Britain, and though it is “not easily conquered,” the things worth fighting for are almost never easy to obtain; especially if the object as Paine describes is “like hell.” Paine’s purpose in correlating Britain’s tyranny to “hell” is to emphasize to the people that if they don’t do something about Britain, they will suffer the wrath of hell — a thought that provoked Americans to join the American revolution. To further persuade Americans to his ideals, Paine states, “God Almighty will not give up a people to military destruction,” assuring the people — those “who have so earnestly and so repeatedly sought to avoid the calamities of war” — that god will not give up on them or leave them to perish. The assurance that god is on their side of the battlefields motivates Americans in going to war because they are under the belief that god will not only help them triumph, but will also protect from danger. His use ...


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...she gets clear of foreign dominion.” Paine’s use of extreme words such as “never” cultivates a sense of hindrance and restraint, which sequentially makes his audience feel an urgent need to get rid of the restraining force — in this case, Britain. Moreover, Paine resumes to assert that America, in a state of unhappiness will be involve in wars that “will break out” “without ceasing” until America reaches happiness — by cutting loose “foreign dominion.” When conjecturing that America will experience endless wars until it breaks away from Britain, Paine is able to develop his pressing tone. Thereby convincing Americans that it is urgent for them to unite and take action against British rule; or this will always be a weighty issue. This remarkable use of urgent and pressing tune promotes Paine’s calling for unity and action towards breaking away from British authority.

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Essay on Thomas Paine 's The American Crisis

- Thomas Paine’s objective in “The American Crisis” is to persuade Americans to untie and take action in ridding America of British control; his writings effectiveness is due primarily to his employment of religious diction, vivid imagery, a sentimental anecdote, an urgent tone, as well as his consistent exploitation of his audiences’ emotions. In an effort to convince his audience to support Americas goal of getting rid of British control, Paine utilizes a great deal of holy diction, granting him the ability to relate to his fellow Americans....   [tags: American Revolution]

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