Essay on Theory of Modern Revolution: Edmund Burke

Essay on Theory of Modern Revolution: Edmund Burke

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In 1959, Singapore gained its independence from British colonial rule with help from the People’s Action Party (PAP). The PAP started a rebellion against British colonial rule and ultimately led to the union with Malaya to create the federation of Malaysia. This federation did not last long due to cultural and political issues, and in 1965, Singapore officially became an independent nation. According to Edmund Burke’s Theory of Modern Revolution, after a country gains its independence, the country usually goes through four stages of modern revolution. These stages are: widespread support of the Uprising; change occurs, society becomes divided by the change, Civil War breaks out and a dictatorial power emerges, thus creating even more opposition and the new government takes more drastic measures (counter-revolution), and someone (group) comes along who takes matters into his own hands who will restore law and order and society ends up in a dictatorship. The country should go through these stages in chronological order, but at times, the country will not go through all the stages, skip stages, or repeat stages. There were racial, political, and cultural differences between the two groups of people and governments in Malaysia that could not be overcome and their federation ended two years after it started. The now independent nation of Singapore went through stage one and then circles back to repeat stage one and stage two of Edmund Burke’s Theory of Modern Revolution at the same time in 1959 through 1965.
Stage one of the theory, which is widespread support of the Uprising; change occurs. Singapore’s main political party, The People’s Action Party, went through stage one first by becoming independent from British colonial rule and ...


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and Strengthening the Administrative State, 1965–1980s.
Fitzgerald, C. P. "The Expulsion of Singapore." Nation 201.11: 208-12. MAS
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ta=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=mat&AN=13049804>.
Reuters. "Singapore Ends Tie off Federation with Malaysia." New York Times [New
York City] 9 Aug. 1965: 1-2. ProQuest Historical Newspapers. Web. 8 Oct.
2013. 1?accountid=6393>.
Straits Times. "A Dream Shattered...Now a Parting of the Ways." Straits Times
[Kuala Lampur] 10 Aug. 1965: 10. National Library Singapore. Web. 8 Oct.
2013. straitstimes19650810-1.2.83.1.aspx>.

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Essay on Theory of Modern Revolution: Edmund Burke

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