The Importance of a Role Model in The Adventures of Huckberry Finn by Mark Twain

The Importance of a Role Model in The Adventures of Huckberry Finn by Mark Twain

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“The Widow Douglas she took me for her son, and allowed she would sivilize me” (Twain 1). The role of a parent is important in a person’s life, as they learn the acceptable way to live their lives, and even how to act spiritually. As people begin to grow up, they remember the traits and guidelines given by their guardians, and use them to establish their own beliefs and shape their actions. In the novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Mark Twain exemplifies the influence of morals and religion that the Widow Douglas teaches young Huck and he returns to throughout the novel.
Mark Twain begins by describing Huck staying in the Widow’s home and conforming to the social norm of civilized behavior he says he “was getting sort of used to the widow’s ways, too, and they warn’t so raspy on me” (Twain 19). Huckleberry is beginning to appreciate the lifestyle of the widow. He begins to like his education, and the love that he receives from the woman. He learns how to be a more respectable human being as he sees the goodness of the Widow’s ways, but as the good characteristics begin to appear they are hindered by the maleficent aspects of his poor initial upbringing. Huck recounts "Pretty soon I wanted to smoke, and asked the Widow to let me. But she wouldn't. She said it was a mean practice and wasn't clean, and I must try to not do it anymore" (Twain 2). The Widow passively attempts to control Huck and force him to conform to the society that he has been attempting to avoid by sneaking away. The idea of smoking represents all the things that Huck use to do in his old life, however the things that are comfortable to Huck are not accepted by the world, and society endeavors to remove the controversial subject or make it change to fit...


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...shows that the boy wishes to be accepted into the religion of the Widow and will do things to help him reach the next life. Huckleberry also remembers that the good people help even the criminals and that he should try to help all sorts of people who are in need. The Widow’s teachings of Christianity have a lasting affect on Huckleberry Finn as he tries to live his life according to the rules he was given and experiences the impact of prayer.
The Importance of Widow in Mark Twain’s novel is shown as Huck Finn experiences the rules and spiritual guidelines the widow has taught him, and they impact his actions in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. People often use the morals they remember from the role models they had when growing up. But, however people remember the teachings of their role models, ultimately they are free to make their own decisions in their lives.

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