Essay about The Teachings Of The Buddha

Essay about The Teachings Of The Buddha

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Siddhartha Gautama, the Buddha, saw the question of origin as unimportant and remained silent in addressing it. Instead, the Buddha sought to describe the world as a cycle, with the repetition between births and deaths called Samsara. “Because this concept is past, present and future, everything in the universe is only transient and has no real individual existence” (Hunter, 2012). Therefore, Samsara is simply a state of being without a supreme god or creator as the catalyst. The cycle of Samsara will continue until Nirvana is attained. Human existence is then connected with the existence of the universe and vice versa. Knowing the origin of the universe and humanity for Buddhist is insignificant as opposed to the quest for a liberation from suffering.
While Buddhist do not believe in a god as creator, they do see the Buddha as the originator of the religion. The teachings of the Buddha created the foundation of the religion much like God’s Word and the teachings of Jesus Christ provide the foundation for a Biblical Worldview. In contrast however, the question of origin is addressed by God in the first words of the Bible. “In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth” (Genesis 1:1 New International Version). The Biblical Worldview then addresses the question of origin as a process, guided by God alone as the creator. “So God created mankind in his own image, in the image of God he created them; male and female he created them” (Genesis 1:27 New International Version). The affirmation that God created humans in His image creates a starting point of Christian faith, one in which gives meaning to life and human existence.

Identity
Buddhist do not observe a permanence of identity when going through the cycles of Samsar...


... middle of paper ...


...much of their lives consist of birth and death cycles within Samsara due in part to greed, ignorance and anger. “Buddhism has become quite popular in the West because it does not consider death to be the end point” (Masel, Schur & Watzke, 2012). Buddhist who therefore break the cycle of Samsara, reach a state of enlightenment that is beyond human comprehension. A complete state of bliss is the life after going through cycles of rebirth.
Similarly, Buddhist and Christians see an ultimate goal of life after death that is without boundaries. For Buddhist, this is Nirvana. In contrast, a Christian’s destiny is salvation and Heaven. “But our citizenship is in heaven. And we eagerly await a Savior from there, the Lord Jesus Christ” (Philippians 3:20 New International Version). Therefore, a Biblical Worldview of destiny should not be feared but rather expectantly awaited.

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