Essay about The Teachings Of The Buddha

Essay about The Teachings Of The Buddha

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Tibetan Buddhism contains many forms of theology and teachings on the ideas of life and its cylinder-like motions. Each form developed from the founder of Buddhism, Siddhartha Gautama, who lived in the fifth century (Powers, 18). Known as the Buddha, the former prince created a religious movement that has swept across the world and stands as a major religion of the world today. Buddhist’s views of humanity, true reality, and the methods of reaching the end of their concept of ‘samsara’ range, yet are linked by the fundamental teachings of a man who wished to enlighten the world. The original teachings of the Buddha and the views of Mahayana and Vajrayana Buddhists create the Tibetan Buddhism recognized around the world.
Siddhartha began the views of humanity and reality within the religion with his sermon given directly after his enlightenment, or achievement of the ultimate consciousness. There was no creator of the world. There was but two realities – conditioned and unconditioned. Conditioned reality is samsara, or the cycle of rebirth. Karma, positive or negative energies accrewed by one’s actions determines which of the 6 realms of samsara a person is born into. Unconditioned reality is parinirvana – only attainable by those who become enlightened. The Buddha then gave the Four Noble Truths to the world, the only way to reach enlightenment and to leave the conditioned realms. The first noble truth is to recognize that all life involves suffering. Next, desires are the cause of all suffering. Following, the only way to break from suffering is to abolish all of one’s desire. Finally, to accomplish this and reach enlightenment, one must follow the eightfold path (Wessinger; Powers 23-24).
Mahayana Buddhists believe that huma...


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... came the third and final turning of the wheel of the dharma. This came with the theological development that all beings hold Buddha nature. Buddha nature is the ability to become enlightened, and since all creatures held this nature, all could become enlightened.
Tibetan Buddhism is a diverse religion, with many sub-sects. Each piece (Original Buddha’s teachings, Mahayana Buddhism, Vajrayana Buddhism, and many more) piece together the religion that so many people around the globe recognize as their following. The ideas each has of human nature in retrospect to true self create a realm that any could aspire to break from to reach a closure in samsara. The methods used by each are straight forward and require great mental and physical control, but the ultimate nirvana is a place worth working towards in the minds of those that practice any form of Tibetan Buddhism.

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Essay about The Teachings Of The Buddha

- Tibetan Buddhism contains many forms of theology and teachings on the ideas of life and its cylinder-like motions. Each form developed from the founder of Buddhism, Siddhartha Gautama, who lived in the fifth century (Powers, 18). Known as the Buddha, the former prince created a religious movement that has swept across the world and stands as a major religion of the world today. Buddhist’s views of humanity, true reality, and the methods of reaching the end of their concept of ‘samsara’ range, yet are linked by the fundamental teachings of a man who wished to enlighten the world....   [tags: Buddhism, Gautama Buddha, Mahayana]

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