Essay on Stuttering: A Speech Disorder

Essay on Stuttering: A Speech Disorder

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Have you ever thought about how we talk and what causes us to say those words the way we say them? Well a speech pathologist does. Their entire job focuses on how and what causes people to speak the way they do. Most people have no problem with speaking but some do. There are several disorders in speech, one being stuttering. Most people do not understand the importance and the difficulty of learning how to cope with the disorder of stuttering. This speech disorder can affect numerous aspects in a patients’ life and can cause embarrassment, or even possibly lower some people’s self-confidence level; to some people stuttering isn’t just an aspect in their life, their life revolves around the disorder and trying to overcome it. When dealing with stuttering it takes identifying the disorder and making sure the patient is being affected by stuttering, also figuring out what will help the individual cope with the side effects of stuttering, and explaining the importance of overcoming this disorder in a stutterer’s daily life.
To be able to cope or overcome any disease or disorder one must first know what the problem is and what causes it. Stuttering is just one of several speech disorders; some disorders are detected at birth but some disorders can acquire as a result of possibly a stroke, an illness, or even a head injury. Stuttering is when a person has a normal fluency in speech and then a dysfluency occurs and can possibly cause the person to have a word or sentence repetition, or even cause interjections. According to Monique Laberge in her article, “Speech Disorder: An Overview”, there is still research to be done to fully understand stuttering.
The causes of stuttering are not very well understood. There is some evidence that ...


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...e Fluent in Their Speech.” Perspectives on Diseases and Disorders: Speech Disorders. Ed. Mary Williams Farmington Hills: Gale, 64-69. Print.
Dahm, Barbara. “Therapy For People Who Stutter Should Focus on Brain Functions Rather Than Speech.” .” Perspectives on Diseases and Disorders: Speech Disorders. Ed. Mary Williams Farmington Hills: Gale, 70-75. Print.
Laberge, Monique. “Speech Disorders: An Overview.” Perspectives on Diseases and Disorders: Speech Disorders. Ed. Mary Williams Farmington Hills: Gale, 16-25. Print.
The Stuttering Foundation. “Many People Who Stutter Have Successful Careers.” Perspectives on Diseases and Disorders: Speech Disorders. Ed. Mary Williams Farmington Hills: Gale, 201. 84-88. Print
Parry Williams. “People Who Stutter Face Discrimination.” Perspectives on Diseases and Disorders.Ed. Mary Williams. Farmington Hills: Gale, 2012. 76-83. Print

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Stuttering: A Speech Disorder

- Have you ever thought about how we talk and what causes us to say those words the way we say them. Well a speech pathologist does. Their entire job focuses on how and what causes people to speak the way they do. Most people have no problem with speaking but some do. There are several disorders in speech, one being stuttering. Most people do not understand the importance and the difficulty of learning how to cope with the disorder of stuttering. This speech disorder can affect numerous aspects in a patients’ life and can cause embarrassment, or even possibly lower some people’s self-confidence level; to some people stuttering isn’t just an aspect in their life, their life revolves around the...   [tags: Speech Pathologist]

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