Struggle over Dominance in Medea by Euripides Essays

Struggle over Dominance in Medea by Euripides Essays

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Marriage – the union of two imperfect souls to form an affectionate and beautiful relationship – is exceptionally intricate and delicate. Two different people with different insights come together to form a harmonious bond. Power, or control, is a chief concept that can “make or break” the affiliation. Distribution of the ruling is frequently divided into males versus females. This partition leads to many conflicts and tribulations. In the catastrophic Greek play Medea, by Euripides, the liaison between Medea and Jason demonstrates how both males and females assert power in the relationship and how incorrect usage of this supremacy leads to dilemmas.
Initially, males direct the lives all members in the relationship by either negatively or positively utilizing their power. The males most often possess a majority of the power in the relationship. At the outset, Jason deceives Medea by having an affair with Creon’s daughter. He recognizes that he has complete authority and that Medea has no option but to accept his actions. Jason believes he has the “right” to negatively dominate the relationship simply because he helped Medea by bringing her amongst the civilized Greeks. This clearly demonstrates how the males avow their control in the relationship -- they can abscond or stay as they desire. They write the destinies of the future of their relationships through their deeds. This “guidance” is a component of their clout as the male figure. Although males may neglect their command, they can also wisely exercise it to help nurture the relationship. After realizing his faux pas, Jason explains to Medea that he is “prepared to give…” (34). He comprehends that although he made a mistake, he can still help provide for the family by giving...


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...arried, or engage in a relationship, they both are powerful and stubborn figures. Their obstinacy and authority conflict directly, which leads to a weak and unstable future. Both feel they can overpower the other, but in the end, they ruin their lives in doing so. Instead, they must work together and uniformly stabilize their authority; precisely Euripides’ advice in Medea.
All in all, Euripides clarifies that families and relationships should be a single figurine of power, as opposed to many opposing forces. The relationship ought to flow together and not struggle over dominance. Many relationships are torn apart. Families are separated; children are deprived of parents. All these heartbreaking stories may not have ever occurred had they heeded Euripides’ message. Although leadership in the relationship is a necessity, correct balance and utilization is a must.

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