The State Of Nature By John Locke And Hobbes Essay

The State Of Nature By John Locke And Hobbes Essay

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Can man survive in The State of Nature? When faced with this question there are three majority answers that will be given. Yes, No or some will say, “Well it depends on who you ask”. Nevertheless, I am here to persuade you into questioning the reality of the state of nature, as it relates to Mankind Survival, through correlations and observations of John Locke and Thomas Hobbes’ writings.
In J. Locke and T. Hobbes writing humans exist in two places. The first place is “The State of Nature”, a place in which one is referring to the state of nature; is when one speaks of a condition in which society is non-existing. The second place is “Society”, a place in which a human decides to join and be governed by rules deemed fit by that society.
While these two philosophers differ in the way that they see a human, which in return drastically affects the state of which “the state of nature” is lived in. The two opposing views of human will give the widest view of how Society and The State of nature are related to one another.
For John Locke man is a kind social animal that, through is motivated by their own personal interests, will for the most part follow a set of natural laws when it comes to dealing with oneself and others. These “Natural Laws” as stated by John Locke reads, “The state of nature has a law of nature to govern it, which obliges every one, and reason, which is that law teachers all mankind, who will consult it, that being all equal and independent, no one ought to harm another in his life, liberty, or possession…”. This is the state of nature in which John Locke sees humans taking their first steps in. However, John Locke’s state of nature laws of nature leaves room for error.
The first of which, in one that I believe...


... middle of paper ...


... even though in Thomas Hobbes’ state of nature, man is not of social creature he implies that when faced with the same danger man will join to take down their common enemy. When looking at deeper one can infer that since no man is above another a threat that would force him together would be of nature itself. So in order for man to survive, he must come together in a group with a common interest that will govern each other until said threat is gone. Thus creating a society of ill intend, club you over the head, stealing, lying, murdering men.
While the two societies created by the circumstances of Thomas Hobbes and John Locke differ in the type of people that are in the societies. The Idea that society is essential for the survival of the first humans correlates the idea that for the survival of our human race society must have been present since the beginning.



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The State Of Nature By John Locke And Hobbes Essay

- Can man survive in The State of Nature. When faced with this question there are three majority answers that will be given. Yes, No or some will say, “Well it depends on who you ask”. Nevertheless, I am here to persuade you into questioning the reality of the state of nature, as it relates to Mankind Survival, through correlations and observations of John Locke and Thomas Hobbes’ writings. In J. Locke and T. Hobbes writing humans exist in two places. The first place is “The State of Nature”, a place in which one is referring to the state of nature; is when one speaks of a condition in which society is non-existing....   [tags: Social contract, Political philosophy]

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