The State Of Nature And The Ideology Arguments Essay

The State Of Nature And The Ideology Arguments Essay

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When thinking about the government, people frequently find themselves asking why the government is needed. However, before we can answer that question, we must think about what it would be like to not have a government. The government helps establish the rules and laws for society. Without this, there would be disorder and there would be absolute chaos. The measure of safety in our daily lives would be thrown out of the window and people would do things without thinking twice about them. Humans want power, to lead or to take responsibility as nature or they want to follow someone they believe is an authority figure. Also, the fact we are so attached to this idea of having a government too would make people want to take them places, which of course would lead on to further problems. The state of nature and the ideology arguments of it are the two explanations as to why we need government, but what is politics about?

Politics is defined roughly as being the study of the ways in which we take decisions collectively within society. This definition leads us to the thought that there are concerns that relate to us all collectively and that we live in something called society. As a whole society, we can only take these decisions together but we cannot take by ourselves as individuals. Policing and criminal justice are two examples which are types of collective decisions.
The first explanation as to why we need government is the concept of the state of nature. This is a theoretical device as it provides us with an explanation as to why in society all members come to make collective decisions rather than just a few of its members. It visualises the need for men to combine together to produce goods and services together but also, for rep...


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... are free from violence due to the security that comes from being a member of an orderly society and we are able to protect property within a system of law. As human beings, we will always find a loop hole to create anarchy which is why it is vital to have services like the police force and the help of the government to keep control of it. Without the government there would a breakdown of collective decisions and there would be no protection of private property, the vulnerable and the individuals. Although anarchists argue the opposite and say the government is evil, it is vital to obtain a civil society and the government also brings change. Though we may be ruled and controlled, the majority have a say when government is in power and the rules that are put in plan by them are not only for our protection but they also tend to be in favour of the majority of society.

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