Stalin 's Influence On The Soviet Union Essay

Stalin 's Influence On The Soviet Union Essay

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World War II left the Soviet Union feeling uneasy; Stalin had lived to see his country invaded a total of three times. Stalin was determined to prevent further damage to his country, so he began creating a buffer zone by essentially forcing the countries of Central Europe to agree to a communistic government that was closely aligned with the USSR. Stalin created the Warsaw Pact in 1955, which bound Central Europe together. However, after Stalin died his iron grip was no longer available to keep the countries of Central Europe in line. Stalin’s successor Khrushchev was an advocate for loosening of the iron grip. Khrushchev believed in the idea that there was “more than one road to socialism.” It was Khrushchev’s policies in regards to socialism that ultimately resulted in the resistance of the Soviet regime for Hungary, Czechoslovakia, and Poland. The three countries, through means ranging from violent to religiously devout, engaged in revolutionary activities as a result of the freedoms offered by Khrushchev, but furthermore, they rebelled against the backlash they received for the “anti-socialist path” they had ventured down (Brezhnev Doctrine, 441). Interestingly, the three countries portray methods discussed in Phillip Hallie’s book Lest Innocent Blood Be Shed that examines one French town’s resistance to the Nazis/Fascism. What is interesting to note is that Poland, the country who seemed to have the “easiest” resistance subscribed to similar moral values as the religious town. Ultimately, the countries of central Europe resisted the Soviets due to the crackdown on “correct” socialism, and those that engaged strongly in moralistic teachings were the most successful at liberation.
Hungary’s resistance is depicted as the most v...


... middle of paper ...


... Poland was largely able to gain support for resistance through the Church, and through the Church it was able to avoid violence while making strong stands against the values that the Soviets stood for; the Polish Pope publically declared anti communist sentiments. Thus, it can be concluded that Poland’s adherence to Catholic values was what allowed it to achieve liberation relatively smoothly.
Hungary, Czechoslovakia, and Poland engaged in resistance to the Soviet regime during the Cold War. While the three engaged in radically different methods, the three were reacting to the idea that there is “more than one road to socialism.” Poland’s adherence to Catholic values let Poland resist the violence that the USSR was capable of doling out. Ultimately Poland serves as a continuation of adhering to ethical and moral ideas set down in the town of Le Chambon during WWII.

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Stalin 's Influence On The Soviet Union Essay

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