Essay on St. Augustine 's Theory Of God

Essay on St. Augustine 's Theory Of God

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St. Augustine’s was one of the most profound philosophers regarding Christianity, he defined Christianity in a unique way that had not been done since the religion had surfaced. At the time this religion was only four centuries old making it much younger then it’s competing religions. As a new religion, before, God had only been perceived, as a metaphysical substance however had no ties to more familiar philosophical notions. For example his literary work Confessions, he revealed his interpretation of Christianity on a personal level while producing a sophisticated interpretation of God’s word by merging it with widely spread Platonic ideas. Augustine states, “The utterance of Plato, the most pure and bright in all philosophy, scatters the clouds of error . . .I found that whatever truth I had read [in the Platonists] was [in the writings of Paul] combined with the exaltation of thy grace.” Using platonic ideas he was able to form the concept of God being a transcendent substance that was present in all things; God was and exists outside of space and time making him infinite and eternal (oregonstate.edu). Augustine appropriation of Plato’s view of reality produced a portrayal of God by applying philosophical analysis and reasoning to the issues of religion. Augustine revealed comparisons and found validation from platonic notions. He then transforms himself into a literary character, thus presenting his sins and flaws to the mercy of God further proving that when the Creator is once again reunited with the created only then can one can obtain purity.
In 300-400 B.C. Plato’s views were still an imminent source of influence around the time of the Roman Empire in which Augustine resided. These philosophies influenced Augustine, beca...


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...r and inquires what it is to be a person. His constructive thinking initiated a view of God that would become popular in western thought; he also created the idea that the presence of God is in individual identity (oregonstate.edu). Augustine finally takes these revelations and places it side by side with himself as the lead role in the story of his own life. By shining light into his own life Saint Augustine acts as a physical metaphor for the struggles between the body and soul to receive God’s love and in turn happiness. Augustine tells a story of his ascent of the soul and essentially makes his audience, his sole reader God himself. By projecting his sins and seeking redemption he pairs eternal life with the action of the Creator being reunited with the created. This reunion serves as validation: only in the presence of the Omnipotent can the soul feel complete.

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