Essay about St. Augustine Of Hippo

Essay about St. Augustine Of Hippo

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St. Augustine of Hippo who was born on November 13, in the year 354 in the small town of Thagaste, located on the northern coast of Africa, modern day Algeria. St. Augustine is known as one of our great church fathers who helped shape and form what is now our modern day church. Some of the events that led to his conversion are 1. Reading of Hortensius by Cicero, 2. His rejection of Manicheanism, 3. His meeting with St. Ambrose, 4. His reading of Neo-Platonist works, Augustine vision. 6. Augustine’s close relationship with his mother. These events eventually led Augustine to find real truth in Christianity.
The reading of Hortensius by Cicero: Was a large influence on Augustine in many as he was in a frenzy to find truth this book encouraged him to alter his prayers to God and not on vain things in life. Along with it changing Augustine’s personal values and his priorities and that all the vain hopes he had once had are gone now gone. These values have been renewed in that he reads the book not to enhance anything about his own style but become closer to God. Augustine continues on page 39 of how he burned and his longing was now after God and not just after earthly wisdom but Godly wisdom and this book kindled inside him at this young age a desire for wisdom.

His rejection of the Mechanism faith: Augustine found this false sect of Christianity while in his pursuit of truth. This religion is a dualism claiming that there are two forces at war with each other mainly light and darkness. During the nine years he was involved with this sect Augustine had several problems with it. One being that he said they cried truth and they talk a lot about it but it was not in them. Augustine goes on to say that they feed him fantasies and ...


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...and not overlooked as God answered her prayers. As Augustine lay weeping on the ground and heard “pick up and read, pick up, and read” and he did so at that moment Augustine talks of the overwhelming relief he received that all his anxieties dissipated. This ends his journey to faith as Augustine is baptized at the Easter vigil by St. Ambrose and then publicly confesses his faith and his conversion to the catholic faith. He was relieved of all the doubts and fears that imprisoned him for so long. As he talks of his new found freedom and the true joy that he now has and how it is sweeter than every pleasure.
This is Augustine’s journey to faith from a wild and rebellious teenager to one who was blinded by a cult for nine years. Then to spend a long while in search and contemplation of the faith till one day God opened his eyes to the truth and showed him saving grace.

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