South Kenya A Small Village Of Sudanese Refugees Essay

South Kenya A Small Village Of Sudanese Refugees Essay

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In Northern Kenya a small village of Sudanese refugees have made a makeshift village, which has served as their permanent housing for the past twenty years. This village displays the kind of poverty that is predictably featured in Time Magazine on a semi-regular basis: mud walls are adorned by straw roofs, ribs can be easily counted on shirtless bodies, flour is a resource precious enough to be rationed, and a formidable desert can be seen in all directions. What do you see when you look at this village? Do you see a primitive society, struggling to survive in a world that has long made struggling for survival antiquated, do you see the cost of western colonialism, do you see a people deprived of the dignity of humanity, do you just see people? No matter what you see I can guarantee one thing: the person next to you will see something completely different when they look at the exact same thing. We take all of our past experiences, our entire education, and we see what best supports our understanding of the world. We like to see ourselves as objective, rational, and enlightened individuals who are pretty much always right. However, take a moment to think of what those Sudanese refugees would think of you, as an observer, and you may start to realize that what makes up our perception of things is made up, almost entirely of past experiences and personal perspectives. How then does our education limit our ability to see the world for what it is, and how can this limitations be overcome? In this essay I will examine the ideas and works of David Brooks, Julio Cortazar, Susan Griffin, and Percy Walker to evaluation how their ideas may help answer this question.
It is mandatory that everyone be administered some form of educat...


... middle of paper ...


... previously ostracized children. The children were able to gain insight about themselves and the world around them because were placed in an environment that fostered such growth. It was both the educational system and the student’s interactions with themselves that created this knew knowledge.
We have our scope of education reduced by schools, we have our parents flawed perspectives forced upon us, and we have society pressuring values upon us. We are raised in an environment where we walk a walk of dreams: never seeing beyond our features, joys, speech, house, trade, manners, troubles, and crimes. This has made it nearly impossible to see ourselves, and, by extension, to see the world. However, we have a choice, we can think back of that Sudanese refugee camp and recover what its meaning from layers of preconceptions. We can choose to see the world for what it is.

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