The Souls Of Black Folk By. B. Du Bois Essay

The Souls Of Black Folk By. B. Du Bois Essay

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For decades since the arrival of African people to America, they had been treated as no more than as material resources and had been oppressed by white society. During their slavery they were to work until death and could not learn to read or write. The author of the Souls of Black Folk, W.E.B. Du Bois, described the struggles of newly freed slaves and the current view of society. Once blacks became free it seemed like they were worse off than when they were slaves. Now they were responsible for their own income, work, family, and lives. White society still did not let them prosper like a white man could, they were put into a system in which they were to abide by the rules of white society, a sort of semi-slavery as Du Bois described. Now trapped inside a veil; which imposed a view of oneself through the eyes of others, blacks were unable to escape their confinement and isolation to better improve their lives. In order for blacks to gain true equality and political power, American society needs to get away from imposing the veil onto minority groups and realize that society has created a system that has failed to recognize blacks. Then give blacks the ability to get educated and be able to vote in order to create equal opportunity for all of the black community.
The fundamental disorder the author has identified is the oppression of African Americans from white society. Since blacks were free from slavery they were not free from society. More issues arose that brought forth American racism and discrimination towards blacks. They were worse off than when they were slaves. As Du Bois stated, “the freedman has not yet found in freedom his promised land” (Du Bois pg. 7). Freedman still did not have the same opportunities as the white...


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...diences to get attached to the journey which he has taken the reader on. To be able to relate to the stories, facts, and experiences he has mentioned in this book so readers can reflect them upon their own lives. Du Bois intentions for this book had me convinced that I was living during this time and brought anger toward me because of all the struggles and issues blacks faced from white society. To a certain extent I believe blacks should have taken action to try to end their oppression, but it would take years until this was actually done. Individually every black person should have worked to improve their way of living then came together collectively to fight back to end their oppression. Of the different thoughts Du Bois had presented, the university education of blacks will be the best weapon to fight back against a society that imposes inequality and unfairness.

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