Social Class, By Bernard Shaw Essay example

Social Class, By Bernard Shaw Essay example

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In society, we are judged by our social class. We are divided into groups depending on our wealth, influence, and status. With each social class, society has certain expectations and norms that they expect people from their catorgorie to follow. For instance, society assumes that the higher an individual is on the hierarchy, the more prosperous and content they are. These are the ideas that Bernard Shaw challenges. Bernard Shaw was an Irish playwright and socialist that desired to demolish the caste system in Britain. He used his play, Pygmalion to depict the contrast of social classes. He exploited his characters, Eliza and Doolittle to depict their experience with rising to the upper class in terms of realism and idealism. He shows us clearly how success comes at a price.
The rise in social class requires a sacrifice. Eliza was a part of the lower class in society as a flower girl. Eliza was characterized as dirty to the point where her hard needed “washing rather badly” (page 1010). Her clothing or rather lack of clothing made her appear unpleasant. Her boots were ruined and she wore a cheap black coat that reached “nearly to her knees” and was “shaped to her waist” (page 1010). She completed her look with a brown coat and coarse apron. Aside from these aspects of her appearance, she did have pleasant features that matched ladies of the upper class. As well as that Eliza spoke in a cockney dialect. She expressed herself in no regards of the circumstances and situation. For example, when she was informed by the bystander that someone was taking notes of her conversation with people, she immediately got defensive. She exclaimed, “I 'm a good girl, I am” (page 1012). She also had a tendency to wail “Ah-ah-ah-ow-ow-ow-oo” (page ...


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...ays the undeserving way” (page 1059). He commented that he never even married Eliza’s mother. Doolittle 's personality and appearance changed entirely due to the transformation. He became someone that he would have solicited and loathed if he ever met them.
Bernard Shaw 's Pygmalion emphasizes the importance of individuality. Individuality is the essence that differentiates everyone from each other. It is what makes you, you. Eliza and Doolittle were considered nobodies and a lesser degree of the scums of the earth. They didn 't really contribute to the growth of society, but they were happy in their own skin. After their transformation, they lost themselves and the part of them that made them stand out from the crowd. Their transformation was costly on their part. Eliza and Doolittle 's lives serve as a warning to falsity and trying to fulfill society 's norms.

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