Essay on Slaughterhouse Five Is Different From Most

Essay on Slaughterhouse Five Is Different From Most

Length: 1610 words (4.6 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Strong Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

​The novel Slaughterhouse-Five is different from most, due to the lack of chronological order in the narration. The narrator kicks off the book by discussing his timely desire to write about his experience in Dresden back in World War Two. However he has already spent countless hours writing thousands of pages on this puzzling topic, which have all been discarded. In order to fulfill his wish of completing such novel, he then calls his old war buddy, Bernard V. O’Hare. After agreeing to get together with the intentions of remembering their days in Dresden, the story begins. The story follows the main character Billy Pilgrim who often jumps back and forth through time; this is what ultimately creates the lack of chronological order in the story. Billy lives in Ilium, New York where he is studying to become an optometrist until he is suddenly drafted into the army where he would be a chaplain’s assistant. While Billy is in the war he finds himself lost during the battle of the bulge. This is when Billy’s time jumps first become evident. Shortly after getting lost, Billy meets another American soldier whose name is Rolland Weary. Weary is very cruel towards Billy which ends up resulting in both of their captures. They are then sent to a prisoner of war camp in Germany by train. However Weary does not make it, but makes sure to leave all the blame of his capture and death on Billy. When Billy arrives at the prison camp he is greeted and nether the less fed by a group of British prisoners of war. During Billy’s time here he continues to have time jumps. After spending some time in the prison he then is sent to a different Prison camp in Dresden, Germany which is ran out of an abandoned slaughterhouse. During Billy’s duration in Dresden...


... middle of paper ...


...out Dresden, since all I would have to do would be report what I had seen” (Vonnegut, 2). This evidently places the narrator in Dresden in his war time which enables one to connect such experience to the authors. Now knowing in fact both the narrator and the author were both prisoners of war in the very city Dresden supports that they are indeed one person.
​In conclusion, by using the traditional approach one can uncover who the unnamed narrator really is. With further research done regarding the book Slaughterhouse-Five and the author Vonnegut in areas such as time period and various life experiences; break through discoveries are made. This causes a result of clearly seeing that Vonnegut the author himself is indeed the narrator, which is ultimately discovered by noticing the sheer similarities of education, occupation and war time experiences that they both share.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Analysis Of The Book ' Slaughterhouse Five ' Essay

- Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis is quoted saying, “The trouble with me is that I’m an outsider. And that’s a very hard thing to be…” At one point or another everyone has felt like an outsider in his or her life. In the novel Slaughterhouse Five Billy Pilgrim suffers from feeling like an outsider a great deal as he struggles with his PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder). From a Marxist Critic’s standpoint a lot of his struggles may also be due to his social and economic class. From being treated like an animal while he was a prisoner of war to coming home and practically being handed more money than he knew what to do with, Billy didn’t know how to cope....   [tags: Slaughterhouse-Five, Kurt Vonnegut]

Strong Essays
755 words (2.2 pages)

Essay on Slaughterhouse Five, By Kurt Vonnegut

- Most novels are not able to adequately present two distinct themes that oppose each other; Slaughterhouse-Five is not most novels. It is unique in almost every way, especially with respect to its themes. In Slaughterhouse-Five, Kurt Vonnegut develops, to the surprise of the reader, the themes of both the necessity of the concept of free will and its illusion. While these themes seem to contradict each other, they are also complimentary. Kurt Vonnegut’s unique writing style enables the reader to perceive both of these themes in the text....   [tags: Slaughterhouse-Five, Kurt Vonnegut]

Strong Essays
1867 words (5.3 pages)

Essay on Slaughterhouse Five Are Obvious And Piercing As One

- Kurt Vonnegut’s anti-war novel, Slaughterhouse Five, illustrates the ghastly experiences within World War II and the journey through the universe and time of the main character, Billy Pilgrim. Although war is a sensitive subject in most cases, Vonnegut’s sarcastic twist mixed with his dark humor on the matter helps bring light to the fact that war is horrendous and can change people down to their core self. Slaughterhouse Five demonstrates the reality of war throughout its major themes, historical accuracy, and Kurt Vonnegut’s personal experiences within World War II that shines light on the horrendous acts of war that has plagued an abundant amount of countries for centuries....   [tags: Slaughterhouse-Five, Kurt Vonnegut]

Strong Essays
1158 words (3.3 pages)

Coping Mechanisms in Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five Essay

- People react differently to tragedies: some mourn, some speak up, and some avoid the sorrow. In Slaughterhouse-Five, Kurt Vonnegut suggests the danger and inhumanity of turning away from the discomfort by introducing Billy Pilgrim as someone who is badly affected by the aftermath of the Dresden bombing, and the Tralfamadorians as the aliens who provide an easy solution to Billy. It is simpler to avoid something as tragic as death, but Vonnegut stresses the importance of confronting it. Vonnegut, like many artists, expresses his ideas through his creations....   [tags: Slaughterhouse-Five]

Strong Essays
1664 words (4.8 pages)

Billy Pilgrim's Struggle with PTSD in Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse Five Essay

- In order to illustrate the devastating affects of war, Kurt Vonnegut afflicted Billy Pilgrim with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), which caused him to become “unstuck in time” in the novel. Billy Pilgrim illustrates many symptoms of PTSD throughout the story. Vonnegut uses these Slaughterhouse Five negative examples to illustrate the horrible and devastating examples of war. The examples from the book are parallel to real life experiences of war veterans, including Vonnegut’s, and culminate in a very effective anti-war novel....   [tags: Slaughterhouse Five]

Strong Essays
1779 words (5.1 pages)

Slaughterhouse Five And The Impact Of War On The Individual Essay

- Slaughterhouse-Five and the Impact of War on the Individual War effects people in multiple ways, some worse than others. “Studies suggest that between twenty and thirty percent of returning veterans suffer, to varying degrees, from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, a mental-health condition triggered by some type of terror, or a traumatic brain injury, which occurs when the brain is jolted so violently that it collides with the inside of the skull, causing psychological damage (Finkel 36).” Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is the most common form of affect on an individual involved in warfare, whether it is the victim or the perpetrator....   [tags: Slaughterhouse-Five, Kurt Vonnegut]

Strong Essays
1035 words (3 pages)

Kurt Vonnegut 's Slaughterhouse Five Essay

- “How nice – to feel nothing, and still get full credit for being alive” (Vonnegut 50). In Slaughterhouse-Five, Kurt Vonnegut introduces the genuine danger war implements on the innocent minds of soldiers by introducing Billy Pilgrim as a prisoner and Dresden bombing survivor. Kurt Vonnegut’s anti-war novel appropriates around a science fiction theme where Billy Pilgrim becomes “unstuck” in time. This allows Billy to experience his life disorderly. "Billy is spastic in time, has no control over where he is going next, and the trips aren 't necessarily fun....   [tags: Slaughterhouse-Five, Kurt Vonnegut]

Strong Essays
1430 words (4.1 pages)

Slaughterhouse-Five and the Psychological Consequences of War Essay

- “How nice- to feel nothing, and still get full credit for being alive” (Vonnegut 181). In Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five the main character Billy Pilgrim experiences few emotions during his time in World War II. His responses to people and events lack intensity or passion. Throughout the novel Billy describes his time travel to different moments in his life, including his experience with the creatures of Tralfamadore and the bombing of Dresden. He wishes to die during most of the novel and is unable to connect with almost anyone on Earth....   [tags: Slaughterhouse-Five Essays]

Free Essays
1382 words (3.9 pages)

Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five as an Antiwar Novel Essay

- Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five as an Antiwar Novel War can affect and inspire people to many degrees. Kurt Vonnegut was inspired by war to write Slaughterhouse-Five, which is a unique book referred to sometimes as a science fiction or semi-autobiographical novel. But, if facts are inferred in the novel, like the similarity of Vonnegut to Billy Pilgrim, facts about other characters (specifically the Tralfamadorians), and the themes and structure of the novel, another way of viewing ;this book can be seen that is as an anti war piece of writing....   [tags: Slaughterhouse-Five Essays]

Free Essays
2286 words (6.5 pages)

Analysis of Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five Essay

- Analysis of Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five Section One- Introduction Slaughterhouse-Five, written by Kurt Vonnegut Junior, was published in 1968 after twenty-three years of internal anguish. The novel was a "progressive work" after Vonnegut returned from World War II. Why did it take twenty-three years for Kurt Vonnegut to write this novel. The answer lies within the book and within the man himself. Kurt Vonnegut served in the Armed Forces during World War II and was captured during The Battle of the Bulge....   [tags: Slaughterhouse-Five Essays]

Free Essays
2383 words (6.8 pages)