Setting in The Masque of the Red Death

997 Words4 Pages
Setting can be looked upon as simply the place and time of where a story takes place, though not knowing that it can be more then just simply information. In this story, “The Masque of the Red Death,” this proves how important setting can really be and how it ties into the actual themes of the story, and the overall setting itself. “The Masque of the Red Death,” takes place somewhere in Europe in the seven chambers of Prince Prospero’s palace. Poe says “A thousand light hearted friends from among the knights and the dames of his court…” This quote shows in fact that the story does take place somewhere in Europe, because the words knights and dames of his court, were words that were commonly used among the European people in the old times. At this point of the story, Poe is explaining where the feast is being held at. Poe states, “But first let me tell of the rooms in which it was held. These were seven-imperial suite.” This ties back into where “The Masque of the Red Death” takes place, more specifically in this case, in Prince Prospero’s seven chamber palace. The quote itself tells that the party the prince is hosting is in his seven chamber palace. Overall, every theme in every chamber of the palace somehow shows and portrays the setting and as well as, death itself, which in the end ties back to the themes of the story. Medieval is the time in which during the story takes place. This is proven when the author states, “A strong and lofty wall girded in it. This wall had gates of iron. The courtiers, having entered, brought furnaces and hammers and welded bolts,” (Poe). This quote explains the structure of the entrance gate and what it looks like when entering Prince Prospero’s palac... ... middle of paper ... ...oal of tying themselves back to the themes by explaining the expressions on the guests face. Setting is a crucial part of this story and all in all helps to explains the themes and how they all relate! Work Cited Graham, Kenneth. “Criticism by Kenneth Graham.” Discovering Authors. Online ed. Detroit: Gale, 2003. Student Resource Center- Gold. Web. 12 Jan. 2010. “The Masque of the Red Death.” Short Stories for Students. Ed. Ira Milne. Vol. Detroit: Thomson Gale, 2000. 232-260. Short Stories for Students. Web. 12 Jan. 2010. Miline, Ira Mark. Short Stories for Student. Presenting Analysis, Context, and Criticism on Commonly Studied Short Stories Volume 8Virtual Reference Library. Detroit, Mich: Gale. Web. 13 Jan. 2010. Thompson Gale, 2000. 232-260. Short Stories for Students. Web. 12 Jan. 2010. Poe Edgar Allan Poe. “The Masque of the Red Death.”
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