Essay on Setting and Geography in The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Essay on Setting and Geography in The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

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The author of The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald, meant for the setting and geography of the novel to relate to its themes, characters, and thoughts so readers would connect a place, person, and idea. There are many important geographical locations in The Great Gatsby. Each of these is specifically selected to correspond to an explicit person or central idea in the novel. The setting is also tremendously significant to The Great Gatsby, as it emphasizes the themes and character traits that drive the novel’s critical events. Without this important correspondence, the novel may not have had the effect on its readers that the author intended it to. If the reader is attentive to the details of the location and setting, the story will begin to unfold a series of comparisons providing more information about how a character really feels, or foreshadowing to what is to come.
The first location, West Egg, correlates to a person who is dazzling and extravagant. A person who became rich and possesses new money just like people who live there. The person who corresponds to West Egg is Jay Gatsby. Both the location and person symbolize the rise of the new rich alongside the conventional aristocracy of the 1920s. Previously, only people who were born into their riches were generally part of the upper class. Social mobility was difficult for those in lower classes because the “old rich” who maintained their prosperity across many generations retained control. During the 1920s however, people were starting to acquire their wealth within their own generations giving themselves the name “new rich”. Gatsby is an example of a person who constituting his own fortune after belonging to a lower social class and economic stratum. Gatsb...


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...going to happen in the coming day.
In conclusion, the setting and geography of The Great Gatsby is an exceptional influence on many things such as characters’ personalities, themes, and foreshadowing. It relates characters to where they live and how they act. East and West Egg, the valley of the ashes, and Nee York City all house different types of people that the main characters in the story represent. The setting, especially the weather foreshadows what will happen that day in the novel. If one regards the locations and conditions they may find out a lot about what a certain character is planning to do or how they are feeling on that particular day. Therefore, the setting and geography dictates many things about the characters such as social status, personality traits, and background, while the weather incorporates a character’s feelings into the setting.

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