The Sedition Act Of 1798 Essay

The Sedition Act Of 1798 Essay

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Sedition Act of 1798
The sedition act of 1798 was a law that consist of people who opposed the government’s policy should be imprisonment and fined. The law was passed by congress and signed by John Adams in 1798, which consists of four series Alien Act, Alien enemies Act, Naturalization Act, and Sedition act. The Sedition act became the biggest reputation to the United States. The constitution ascertained the right to have freedom of speech, but the Sedition Act prosecutes those who voice against the government. The Sedition Act did not want Americans to do any false writing against the federal government. The first Amendments clarifies that congress has no right to make a law that will be established on religion or abridging the freedom of speech; or protest peacefully. The Sedition Act opposed the first amendment. There was many people Republicans who were against the sedition act, who believed that it was unconstitutional. They also argued that the federal government has advanced their powers. Congress and George Hay argue how the sedition act is Constitutional and unconstitutional. Personally, I am mostly against the law because it is not following the first amendment. The Sedition Act of 1798 was unconstitutional and threatened the security of the United States and the freedom of its people.
The Constitution was ratify in 1787, which also included the bill of right as well. Anti- Federalist believe that without the bill of rights the government will have too much power. The Federalist did believe in the bill of rights, but felt that it was not needed in the constitution. The Federalist believed that the constitution was sufficient. After the Constitution was ratified, the growth of the political factions started to develop ...


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...ults about people that goes towards their family or using foul language to an individual. However, it is okay for writers to express their own thoughts on a decision that the government or an individual made, but the writers need to criticize in a proper manner.
In conclusion, the Sedition act of 1798 was unconstitutional for Congress to take away the American people’s liberty of freedom and press. Hay states his opinion on how the act is making the government stronger and how it is restricting American citizen’s rights. The sedition act was opposing the Constitution bill of rights making it a debate to remove the Sedition Act. Therefore the Sedition act was revoke after the election of 1800 when the federalist candidate John Adams lost to the Republican Thomas Jefferson, which was the last President from the Federalist Party to become President of the United States.

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