The Second Reason Of Act Morally Essay

The Second Reason Of Act Morally Essay

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The second reason to act morally is because there is religion. Sometimes moral codes are obtained by theologians who clarify holy books, like the Bible in Christianity, the Torah in Judaism, and the Qur 'an in Islam. Their conclusions are often accepted as absolute by their believers. Those who believe in God view him as the supreme law giver; a God to whom we owe obedience and allegiance. In other words, they think that being a good person is one who obey god by following his commandments. Religion helps people to judge whether a certain act is good or bad, which can be considered as the definition of morality. Most religions promote the same values which are: fairness, loyalty, honesty, trust, etc.... Similarly, McGinn lists the same qualities that person should have to be moral which are kindness, honesty, justice, and independence (100). Some religions agree on these virtues that will be needed by all people, at all places, and at all times. For their believers, religions can be considered as teachers of morality and guidelines that people use to find out the right direction and to judge what is wrong and good. Therefore, to make appropriate decisions, they refer back to it.
However, it is essential to understand that people can make moral decisions without having a religion or being religious. Some people think that the religion is God-given and flexible for all times, but the other see it as traditions that change with time. Folkways can change to mores which are habits and traditions that are used to make moral judgments. Sumner believes that sometimes mores and folkways can be harmful and dangerous (24). Therefore, a person may think that what was right for ancestors may not be right these days now. Thus, most religions’ ...


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... values. It is essential to accept that holding a belief without any sufficient evidence doesn’t harm its holder only, but even the people around him because beliefs control our actions. Generally, to better describe the formation of our ideas and avoid limited beliefs, we should replace the word belief with the word thought. Limited beliefs can be acquired by the media, relatives, and friends. People tend to gather information that supports their existing beliefs rather than the ones that form new beliefs. Therefore, instead of owning a belief, a person should question the limiting beliefs and come up with theories that are based on evidence. Overall, the question “why be moral?” is an essential question because it is a socially important. Thus, because beliefs are not a private matter, a better question can be: would you like the others to behave morally with you?

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