Your search returned over 400 essays for "theory of knowledge"
1  2  3  4  5    Next >>

The Theory Of Knowledge Management

- Our modern society encounters rapid changes that inevitably lead business organization to become continuous innovative engine in facing the dialectic of stability and change to meet the demand of ongoing changing environment. In order to be remaining competitive through providing superior value; today, businesses are required to gear up its knowledge based activities by taking knowledge management initiatives seriously. Surely, knowledge management in organization gets its momentum in recent discussion of both academic and practitioner fields....   [tags: Knowledge management, Knowledge, Management]

Better Essays
2373 words | (6.8 pages) | Preview

The Theory of Knowledge

- "That which is accepted as knowledge today is sometimes discarded tomorrow." Is it ever truly knowledge if it can be simply discarded the next day. Or alternatively if knowledge can be dismissed or discarded then where is its value. Can certain sources of knowledge be more easily discarded due to how they are researched. Some people wish for concrete evidence to prove or disprove an idea or belief and through this can arrive at what they believe is knowledge of a topic....   [tags: Natural Sciences]

Strong Essays
1315 words | (3.8 pages) | Preview

The Theory of Knowledge

- This paper will look and integrate areas of knowledge such as Music, Mathematics, Ethics, Natural Sciences, and CAS and will cover ways of knowing such as reasoning, emotion, language, perception, and morality (Amy Scott n.d.) and its correlation to attaining knowledge. This will go into many comparisons and differences between knowledge attained and not attained by words/symbols. We define that as lexical versus non-lexical knowledge (Meijs et al. n.d.). Knowledge is defined as the ‘acquaintance with facts, truths, or principles, as from study or investigation” (Russell 1992), or “general erudition” (Houghton Mifflin Company 2003a)....   [tags: Philosophy ]

Powerful Essays
1668 words | (4.8 pages) | Preview

The Theory of Knowledge

- “That which is accepted as knowledge today is sometimes discarded tomorrow.” What is knowledge. Knowledge can be defined as the theoretical or practical understanding of a subject acquired by a person through experience or education . There are seven official ways of knowing according to the Theory of Knowledge text book provided by the IB Diploma Program, these are: language, reason, perception, emotion, memory, imagination, and intuition. These areas conflict with the subjectivity they may bring since hey may be biased or influenced by personal feelings, tastes, or opinions....   [tags: Natural Sciences]

Strong Essays
1054 words | (3 pages) | Preview

The Theory of Knowledge

- Using history and at least one other area of knowledge, examine the claim that it is possible to attain knowledge despite problems of bias and selection. In my Theory of Knowledge course, we had a small debate on whether feng shui and other forms of alternative medicine, i.e. acupuncture and aromatherapy are reputable. Some stated that the promoted results from these practices are psychological, in which the supposed results are based on the knower’s belief of the potency of said practice. Others rebutted that the results are more neurological, in which the knower allows the brain to accept the activity without reluctance....   [tags: Philosophy ]

Powerful Essays
1361 words | (3.9 pages) | Preview

The Theory of Knowledge

- “That which is accepted as knowledge today is sometimes discarded tomorrow.” We live in a strange and puzzling world. Despite the exponential growth of knowledge in the past century, we are faced by a baffling multitude of conflicting ideas. The mass of conflicting ideas causes the replacement of knowledge, as one that was previously believed to be true gets replace by new idea. This is accelerated by the rapid development of technology to allow new investigations into knowledge within the areas of human and natural sciences....   [tags: Natural Sciences]

Strong Essays
1381 words | (3.9 pages) | Preview

The Theory Of Knowledge Management

- T.D. Wilson (2002) makes a point of identifying several sources of articles, references and course syllabi with varying takes on knowledge management within organizations. Wilson is convinced that organizations misuse the terminology “knowledge management” and that their activities are more concerned with managing information than with the management of knowledge (Wilson, 2002). Wilson defines knowledge as involving “the mental processes of comprehension” or, as “what we know” and information as the expression of what we know and can convey through messages (Wilson, 2002)....   [tags: Management, Knowledge management, Organization]

Better Essays
819 words | (2.3 pages) | Preview

The Pursuit of Knowledge

- Ever wonder how the world would be today only if our great researchers implemented a different attitude towards their experiments. It is possible that the results would remain same. However, some argue that the consequences may be altered. Nonetheless, this does not make the earlier learned knowledge valued less or false, just supplementary. Abraham Maslow’s theory challenges nearly all ways of knowing, suggesting that if we limit our thinking, the outcomes remain homogenous, therefore, limiting the amount of knowledge we acquire....   [tags: Theory of Knowledge]

Better Essays
1040 words | (3 pages) | Preview

The Theory of Knowledge

- "That which is accepted as knowledge today is sometimes discarded tomorrow." Until 1900, human knowledge doubled approximately every century. Post-WWII, it doubled every 25 years. It now appears to grow exponentially. This has resulted in the revision of the information previously thought of as knowledge. This raises these knowledge issues: if knowledge that is accepted today is sometimes discarded tomorrow, and the aim of the natural sciences is to provide the complete objective truth, can science ever achieve this aim....   [tags: Natural Sciences]

Powerful Essays
1450 words | (4.1 pages) | Preview

The Theory of Knowledge

- Human beings have a thirst for knowledge, which leads to the evolution and the creation of knowledge. We gain knowledge through sense perception, reason, language and emotion. Every one of these determinants can be influenced by personal background, feelings, and incomplete methods of reasoning and so on. Therefore, this essay will be analyzing the above question through two areas of knowledge history and religion. Knowledge, learnt today may easily be discarded tomorrow due to various reasons, of the notion of time is different and today is considered as the present whereas tomorrow is understood as the future....   [tags: Natural Sciences]

Strong Essays
1219 words | (3.5 pages) | Preview

Ethical Judgements Limit Knowledge

- Ethical judgements limit the methods available in the production of knowledge in both, the arts and the natural sciences. The aforementioned question incorporates a clear sense of direction and purpose, laying out the fundamentals of the Theory Of Knowledge by visibly stating the Areas of Knowledge that are supposed to be further delved into; in this case ethics, arts and natural sciences. The topic aims to denote that ethics are directly correlated to arts and natural sciences, the three being interdependent on each other and influencing one another in some way or the other....   [tags: Theory of Knowledge]

Strong Essays
1401 words | (4 pages) | Preview

The Theory Of Knowledge And Practices Of Power

- Positionality refers to one’s social location or position within an intersecting web of socially constructed hierarchical groups, such as race, class, gender, sexual orientation, religion, nationality, and physical abilities. Different experiences, understanding, and knowledge of oneself and the world are gained, accessed, and produced based on one’s positionality (Sorrells). Standpoint theory emerged in the 1970s and 1980s as a feminist critical theory about relations between the production of knowledge and practices of power (Harding, 2004)....   [tags: Culture, Sociology, Anthropology, Race]

Better Essays
1036 words | (3 pages) | Preview

Social Constructionism : A Theory Of Knowledge

- Social constructionism is a theory of knowledge which reflects the notion of everyday phenomena, objects, science and even reality itself not existing a priori but rather being socially constructed between individuals. Extending this argument, language is considered as the basic means by which social processes take place and reality is re-constructed (Leeds-Hurwitz, W. 2009). The following paragraphs will present the basic premises and assumptions of social constructionism, its historical multidisciplinary roots, a brief criticism of traditional psychology and the application of social constructionism in psychology....   [tags: Sociology, Scientific method, Psychology]

Strong Essays
2424 words | (6.9 pages) | Preview

Theory Of Knowledge : An Unethical Action

- THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE ESSAY NOVEMBER 2014 PRESCRIBED TITLE #6 “We may agree about general standards in the arts but disagree as to whether a particular work has artistic merit. In ethics the situation is reversed: we may disagree about ethical theories but we all know an unethical action when we see one.” Discuss. CANDIDATE NAME: Shaelyn Chung CANDIDATE NUMBER: 002109003 WORDS: 1,515 In this essay, we will discuss the statement “We may agree about the general standards in the arts but disagree as to whether a particular work has artistic merit....   [tags: Ethics, Deontological ethics, Virtue ethics]

Strong Essays
1690 words | (4.8 pages) | Preview

The True Belief Theory Of Knowledge

- The true-justified-belief theory of knowledge is an attempt to subject knowledge to analysis. The theory falls under the category of Epistemology, a branch of philosophy dealing with knowledge. The theory, in short, seeks to answer the question, what does it mean to know something. What parts lead up to a point, when someone can claim to have knowledge of something. The true-justified-belief theory of knowledge or “JTB” has three such components seeking to answer the aforementioned questions....   [tags: Truth, Epistemology, Belief]

Strong Essays
1790 words | (5.1 pages) | Preview

The Theory Of Knowledge Is Impossible

- After admitting that he does not know what virtue is almost halfway through Plato’s Meno, Meno states a few premises involving the acquisition of knowledge, which coined the term Meno’s paradox. In this paradox Meno says that virtue or knowledge is impossible to learn because of it. Meno then questions Socrates on how they can find what virtue is if they can’t discover it which I believe Socrates resolves by stating the theory of recollection and how the theory of recollection shows one part of the premise false by conversing with the slave boy....   [tags: Plato, Virtue, Ethics, Justice]

Better Essays
1579 words | (4.5 pages) | Preview

The Theory of Knowledge

- "That which is accepted as knowledge today is sometimes discarded tomorrow." Every day events occur and new discoveries are made. These discoveries can range from smaller personal discoveries about ones self or life, all the way to larger discoveries in science and in history. These discoveries have the possibility of changing the way that certain things are taught and viewed. This leads to the knowledge issue of to what extent are knowledge claims more malleable in natural sciences rather than in history....   [tags: Natural Sciences]

Strong Essays
1308 words | (3.7 pages) | Preview

The Theory of Knowledge

- "That which is accepted as knowledge today is sometimes discarded tomorrow." My intuitive reaction to to the statement was one of an affirmative. Being an ardent student of natural sciences, it was immediately obvious to me how much knowledge had progressed over time. The development of technology has allowed us to widen our perception: to observe what couldn’t be observed, to hear what couldn’t be heard, and to record what couldn’t be recorded, with unprecedented precision and accuracy, producing new knowledge as a result....   [tags: Natural Sciences]

Powerful Essays
1398 words | (4 pages) | Preview

The Theory of Knowledge

- Producing knowledge has always been a fundamental aspect of human nature. As curious individuals, we strive to discover new facts, create new inventions, and define new ideas. This fascination with exploration is what propels us forward as a society; however, the methods we utilize to achieve these goals can be debated as ethically correct or not. As each individual has his or her own perceptions of what can be considered ethically correct, ethical judgements often vary, limiting the abilities of ethical judgements to limit the production of knowledge....   [tags: Natural Sciences]

Powerful Essays
1416 words | (4 pages) | Preview

The Theory of Knowledge

- “That which is accepted as knowledge today is sometimes discarded tomorrow.” Knowledge itself can be compared to a small child who is about to begin the long way in learning. Why this comparison. Since, as the child grows and goes through all the school years, with time, he will learn more and more than what he did before. The same situation can be applied to knowledge itself. The pursuit of knowledge has lead mankind to the point of development we are at as of the 21st century. With the passing of time, new ideas and methodologies, and key technological developments have lead, not to discarding knowledge, but to modifying our previous knowledge....   [tags: Natural Sciences]

Strong Essays
1037 words | (3 pages) | Preview

The Theory of Knowledge

- “That which is accepted as knowledge today is sometimes discarded tomorrow.” The world evolves around us and we evolve around it. Knowledge as we know may develop and change over a period of time. Knowledge in its working definition is information passing from one person to another by using different methods of communication, then by using the ways of knowing to take information, which is kept in our minds as memories for future use as a knowledge- as a true belief. The knowledge we understand off can overtake some of the other ideas that we have found....   [tags: Natural Sciences]

Strong Essays
1320 words | (3.8 pages) | Preview

The Theory of Knowledge

- A couple of days ago, a picture of a toddler, no older than two years old, sitting in the toilet juggling a laptop, headphones and a plate of pasta all at once, went viral. We live in the age of the multi tasker, multi-minded and multi-perspective. However, no matter how many pictures of multi-tasking toddlers surface the web, the notion that we as a society have become more multi-minded is an assumption. It is the illusionary dream of globalization created by new-found abilities like falling in love via Instagram or arguing with governors about political reforms in just 140 characters....   [tags: Natural Sciences]

Powerful Essays
1398 words | (4 pages) | Preview

The Theory of Knowledge

- "That which is accepted as knowledge today is sometimes discarded tomorrow." As far as we can be concerned we won’t be able to say with assertion how can we account for what seems implausible on all accounts of earlier attempts that has failed to have produced evidences empirically factual to the propositions as assertively true of its existence holds true even today when the questions that can be raised with newer dimensions as to whether there can be a science of it or science in it which would rightly mean and in the sense of the science in it had already been touched upon as what has been observed of the changes under what generalized circumstances of...   [tags: Natural Sciences]

Strong Essays
1142 words | (3.3 pages) | Preview

Aristotle 's Theory Of Knowledge

- Throughout this class I have come to learn that my views best match up with that of an empiricist, and that of a virtue ethicist. I found that all the theories were interesting and had many good points, and many flaws. A philosopher who holds both of the views I agree most with is Aristotle. There are many theories concerning epistemology, the theory of knowledge all with good points. Aristotle 's theory of knowledge falls under the category of empiricism, but has its own take. He agrees that a posteriori clams are necessary for the sciences, and that knowledge can be gained through experience....   [tags: Scientific method, Ethics, Logic, Aristotle]

Better Essays
999 words | (2.9 pages) | Preview

Theory Of Knowledge : Mathematics

- Kelsey Amadeo-Luyt Theory of Knowledge September 2, 2014 Prompt: To understand something you need to rely on your own experience and culture. Does that mean this it is impossible to have objective knowledge. As children we are immersed in our communities in which we are fed predisposed knowledge that has been passed down and developed within our communities or families for numerous generations. Not until we begin primary, or even secondary school do we start to formulate ideas and opinions of our own....   [tags: Logic, Mathematics, Axiom, Scientific method]

Strong Essays
1084 words | (3.1 pages) | Preview

Descartes ' Theory Of Knowledge

- The question that has plagued philosophers for centuries has been “how do we come to know what we know?” The renowned philosopher Rene Descartes discusses this phenomenon, lending forth his own solutions to this perennial predicament. In the First Meditation, Descartes’ examines truth and fallacy through the methodical picking-apart of candidates of truth. Descartes’ idea of knowledge revolves around the philosophical staple, “I think therefore I am” and believing we should come upon truth and knowledge by questioning what is presently known, looking towards God as a viable solution, and ultimately coming to conclusions by relying on the mind and intellectual thought....   [tags: Epistemology, Truth, Reality, Rationalism]

Strong Essays
1671 words | (4.8 pages) | Preview

John Locke's Theory of Knowledge

- John Locke (1632-1704) was the first of the classical British empiricists. (Empiricists believed that all knowledge derives from experience. These philosophers were hostile to rationalistic metaphysics, particularly to its unbridled use of speculation, its grandiose claims, and its epistemology grounded in innate ideas) If Locke could account of all human knowledge without making reference to innate ideas, then his theory would be simpler, hence better, than that of Descartes. He wrote, “Let us then suppose the mind to be, as we say, white paper, void of all characters, without any ideas: How comes it to be furnished....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Strong Essays
1557 words | (4.4 pages) | Preview

Galileo Galilei's Theory: Knowledge

- “That which is accepted as knowledge today is sometimes discarded tomorrow.” Consider knowledge issues raised by this statement in two areas of knowledge. This statement above basically says that information known as knowledge which is recognized same by everyone today will change tomorrow because it is changed. By breaking down and defining the important words like; “knowledge”, “sometimes”, “accepted” and “discarded”, will help understand the statement more clearly. “Knowledge” is defined as “facts, information, and skills acquired by a person through experience or education; the theoretical or practical understanding of a subject (merriam, 2014).” This means that in order to have the info...   [tags: copernicus, revolutionists ]

Strong Essays
1051 words | (3 pages) | Preview

Plato's Theory of Knowledge

- “If the truth of all things always existed in the soul, then the soul is immortal” (The Philosophical Journey 89). This states that since the soul has all knowledge integrated, one recollects this knowledge through situations in an individual’s life and use one’s reasoning. With the dialogues of the Meno and Phaedo, Plato discusses the ideas of recollection and immortality of the soul in general. As well, the Republic, through the three different situations shown, Plato shows the ideas of the forms and what is real and what is not....   [tags: Philosophy, Greek]

Powerful Essays
2742 words | (7.8 pages) | Preview

The Theory Of Knowledge And Knowledge

- In every field of study that exists, experts research, test, and reach conclusions; later they often debate, their ideas clashing to see which holds the most merit and which is the best to continue researching. This is the basis of our understandings, turning the personal knowledge of experts into shared knowledge that can be used to better the lives of everyone, and this comes from the disagreements in our Areas of Knowledge (AoKs). Before we delve further, we need to define some terms. Facts are understood as something that is the case, or as information that makes a sentence true....   [tags: Ethics, Morality, Scientific method, Philosophy]

Better Essays
1592 words | (4.5 pages) | Preview

The Justified True Belief Theory Of Knowledge

- The Justified True Belief (JTB) theory of knowledge, often attributed to Plato , is a fairly straightforward theory of knowledge. It states that something must be true if person S believes proposition P, proposition P is true, and S is justified in believing in believing that P is true . While many consider the JTB theory to be vital to the understanding of knowledge, some, such as American Philosopher Edmund Gettier, believe that it is flawed. I tend to agree with Gettier and others who object to the JTB theory as an adequate theory of knowledge, as the JTB theory allows for a type of implied confirmation bias that can lead people to be justified in believing they know something even though...   [tags: Truth, Epistemology, Belief]

Strong Essays
1519 words | (4.3 pages) | Preview

Plato 's Theory Of Knowledge And Opinion

- Plato believes there is two types of worlds that are of knowledge and opinion. As he understands, what is an every lasting reality is a true knowledge, which is the heart of what needs to be understood and everything people need to know. As he says for opinion, it will be only successful some times, as knowledge will always be right and successful at all times when implemented. An opinion for him has no base on true knowledge, but pure people’s speculations of their points of views. A true knowledge will never be influenced by any changes and it cannot be affected by anything; it will stand alone without changing....   [tags: Plato, Soul, Socrates, Epistemology]

Strong Essays
1160 words | (3.3 pages) | Preview

The Theory Of Knowledge Used Around The World

- He began with: nothing shall be concluded as true unless it was fully proven so (p.8, Descartes). The second rule stated that all problems should be divided up into the smallest possible parts in order to make the analysis simpler. The third rule required Descartes to start simple and gradually increase the difficulty of the topics of his studies as he progressed. Finally, he required himself to regularly reassess his progress to make sure he did not skip over anything important (p.9, Descartes)....   [tags: God, Religion, Blaise Pascal, Pascal's Wager]

Strong Essays
1564 words | (4.5 pages) | Preview

Theory Of Knowledge

- Theory Of Knowledge In today’s society, science is regarded as being the most trusted form of knowledge, leading to many claiming it to be the supreme form of knowledge. To investigate whether or not this is justified we must compare science to other forms/areas of knowledge and consider what they each contribute. The strongest argument science has to claim this title, is the objectivity and empirical nature of its method and in particular its verifying processes; mainly based on inductive and deductive reasoning....   [tags: Papers]

Strong Essays
1519 words | (4.3 pages) | Preview

Theory of Knowledge

- Theory Of Knowledge ‘Don’t give me any more facts. I need to make a decision right now!’ Although one can question knowledge endlessly, one cannot forever suspend judgment while researching and reflecting. What would it mean to act responsibly in a situation where one cannot possess certainty. How would one justify the decision. Within all individuals, there is a basic necessity to obtain certain answers to questions, which is known as gumption. The satisfaction of this “gumption” in certain cases, becomes the basic factor of life needed to function....   [tags: essays research papers]

Free Essays
812 words | (2.3 pages) | Preview

Taking a Look at the Theory of Knowledge

- Within the world, many times we have to reevaluate and consider multiple varying possibilities. Nothing is ever completely known, so when new discoveries are made about a topic that has already been previously discovered we must readapt our way of thinking about something that we believed we had used to know. In order to evaluate the quote, “That which is accepted as knowledge today is sometimes discarded tomorrow,” we must first define key words within the phrase to get a better understanding of what the quote actually means....   [tags: psychological and philosophical analysis]

Better Essays
997 words | (2.8 pages) | Preview

The Argument Of The Theory Of Knowledge

- Berkeley the noted empiricist ended up in idealism that in fact, wanted to solve the tension in Locke 's account of knowledge, noticing that his indirect realistic position and its components causes inconsistency in this account; to remove this problem he ends up to an absolute idealism: only ideas exist. He starts his discussion, raising two arguments: The first argument in opposition to the prevalent notion that we are able to verify independent objects, existing external to us based on the Parmenidian idea that for every thought in our mind there is an object in reality that was the main challenge of ancient skeptics....   [tags: Mind, Metaphysics, George Berkeley, Perception]

Better Essays
1523 words | (4.4 pages) | Preview

Descartes 's Theory Of Knowledge

- Descartes had a desire to achieve true truth, in this it became apparent for him to set up a system that would allow him to achieve such an aspiration. One of Descartes most ambitious undertakings was to prove that there was a God and a soul; here his system was utilized. In following this system he would gradually come to conclusions that were not only true and increased his knowledge, but also were easily understood so others were able to follow his methods as well. These rules were, to never except anything that was not true as a truth, to take a problem and divide it into as many parts as possible, then from least difficult to most, slowly answer each problem in turn, and finally to revi...   [tags: Truth, Mind, Perception, Sense]

Better Essays
1383 words | (4 pages) | Preview

A Global Theory of Knowledge for the Future

- A Global Theory of Knowledge for the Future ABSTRACT: There is too much factual knowledge to grasp even a speck of the whole. This makes for an excessive diversity that lacks in coherent unity. With no coherency in the parts, there will be no coherent truth in the whole. Without coherent truth there is only a relative truth. Relative truth makes for contradiction from different viewpoints, perceptions, and perspectives. Contradictions deny a common definition and meaning of truth, morality, justice, and beauty....   [tags: Philosophy Philosophical Papers]

Free Essays
3257 words | (9.3 pages) | Preview

Little Consensus on the Theory of Knowledge

- Little Consensus on the Theory of Knowledge Descartes’ meditations deal largely with the issues of knowledge; namely can we have any, if so of what sort, and of course with what support. This essay will ask a single question of a rather different nature: Why. This stated more clearly is to ask: Why bother with knowledge or any theory thereof. In response to this, Descartes will offer several arguments; these include a simple human interest, concerns over free will, and understanding of human motivation, and a question of moral values....   [tags: Philosophy Essays]

Better Essays
816 words | (2.3 pages) | Preview

Locke And Hume 's Theory Of Knowledge

- Locke and Hume have similar concepts surrounding knowledge and how it is obtained. They both explain that knowledge is not innate, and that you are not born with knowledge already within you but that you gain it through your sense impressions. Locke states that “ men, barely by the use of their natural faculties, may attain to all the knowledge they have, without the help of any innate impressions.” He follows this statement by explaining that it would be wrong to assume that the idea of colors were innate when God gave a person the ability to experience and discover colors through the eyes....   [tags: Perception, Mind, Cognition, Idea]

Better Essays
1031 words | (2.9 pages) | Preview

Plato 's Theory Of Knowledge And Wisdom

- Philosophy is the critical, generally systematic approach with a reliance on reasoned argument. The word itself comes from the Greek origin meaning "love of knowledge and wisdom". A famous and well known philosopher, Socrates and his talented student Plato, along with Plato 's best student Aristotle, dealt with the Aesthetic branch of philosophy. This meant they tried to define the aspects of art or beauty. Ever since the time of Ancient Greece and even far before them, people have been trying to answer the question: what is art....   [tags: Art, Aesthetics, Laurie Halse Anderson, Speak]

Strong Essays
1197 words | (3.4 pages) | Preview

Kant's Theory of Knowledge and Solipsism

- Kant's Theory of Knowledge and Solipsism In his Critique of Pure Reason Kant set out to establish a theory of human understanding. His approach was to synthesise the opposing views of empiricism and rationalism. He took the empirical principle that 'all our knowledge begins with experience' [p.1] as a foundation of his philosophy, following Locke and Hume. In contrast to them, however, he also included the rationalist view that posits the existence of an apparatus of human understanding that is prior to experience, and is essential in order that we have experience at all....   [tags: Philosophy Philosophical Papers]

Powerful Essays
3200 words | (9.1 pages) | Preview

John Locke's Theory of Knowledge

- I. General Notions Francis Bacon and Thomas Hobbes were not truly conscious of the phenomenalistic consequences of their theory of knowledge, which was based on empiricism. Both considered sensation as phenomenal presentations and also as representations of reality. Thus they still had something upon which to build an absolute metaphysics. With Locke gnosiological phenomenalism enters its critical phase. By considering sensations merely as subjective presentations, Locke gives us a theory of knowledge of subjective data devoid of any relation with external objects....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Powerful Essays
1877 words | (5.4 pages) | Preview

David Hume's Theory of Knowledge

- Knowledge is gained only through experience, and experiences only exist in the mind as individual units of thought. This theory of knowledge belonged to David Hume, a Scottish philosopher. Hume was born on April 26, 1711, as his family’s second son. His father died when he was an infant and left his mother to care for him, his older brother, and his sister. David Hume passed through ordinary classes with great success, and found an early love for literature. He lived on his family’s estate, Ninewells, near Edinburgh....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Good Essays
855 words | (2.4 pages) | Preview

Robert Nozick's Tracking Theory of Knowledge in Philosophical Explanations

- In his “Philosophical Explanations”, Robert Nozick produced his tracking theory of knowledge. This externalist theory is used to explain how through truth tracking we can obtain knowledge. He states that what we use to learn of the truth is the method. But Nozick denies the importance of methods in his theory, to the point were does not even believe that we have to know what the method is. Instead, Nozick allows us to use any method we wish to, so long as we only use one. But not all methods are reliable, and therefore don’t allow for us to be justified....   [tags: truth, externalism, justification]

Better Essays
630 words | (1.8 pages) | Preview

The Theory Of Knowledge Is Derived From Sense Perception

- While empiricism is the theory that knowledge is derived from sense perception, there are varying degrees. Radical empiricists believe that all knowledge results from experience, while more moderate empiricists believe that experience is the basis of all knowledge except for analytic statements which are considered logical truths. Similarly, synthetic statements are considered by such empiricists as empirical truths. Empiricists stress the importance of observation. Unlike rationalists who believe in the existence of priori knowledge that can be deduced through reason, empiricists believe in posteriori knowledge, knowledge resulting from or dependent on experience, more specifically from sen...   [tags: Empiricism, Scientific method, Rationalism]

Better Essays
1207 words | (3.4 pages) | Preview

Plato's Theory of Knowledge

- Plato's Theory of Knowledge Plato's Theory of Knowledge is very interesting. He expresses this theory with three approaches: his allegory of The Cave, his metaphor of the Divided Line and his doctrine The Forms. Each theory is interconnected; one could not be without the other. Here we will explore how one relates to the other. In The Cave, Plato describes a vision of shackled prisoners seated in a dark cave facing the wall. Chained also by their necks, the prisoners can only look forward and see only shadows, These shadows are produced by men, with shapes of objects or men, walking in front of a fire behind the prisoners....   [tags: Papers]

Good Essays
921 words | (2.6 pages) | Preview

The Theory Of Theories Of Knowledge

- Foundational thought is concerned with the theories of knowledge that are based on a certain belief. In psychology, the fathers of psychology made a great contribution to the thoughts and knowledge they made and they are behind the knowledge of psychology in place. Many fathers of psychology have made a remarkable contribution to the subject although their arguments are facing criticism by modern psychologists. Sigmund Freud is one of the founders of psychology, and he came up with the theory of psychoanalysis and psychodynamic in the field of psychology....   [tags: Psychology, Psychoanalysis, Behaviorism]

Better Essays
1059 words | (3 pages) | Preview

John Locke's Theory of Knowledge

- John Locke was an empiricist who believed that people could acquire knowledge from experience. Ideas acted as raw materials and by knowing the relation of the ideas, we got knowledge. All ideas are based on experience but knowledge can also be justified by intuition and demonstration. By sensation and reflection, we get sensitive, intuitive and demonstrative knowledge with different degrees of certainty and ways of evidence. In investigating the two main sources of ideas of Locke, we then will explain the two kinds of knowledge which based on reasoning by using suitable examples....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Good Essays
1061 words | (3 pages) | Preview

David Hume's Theory of Knowledge

- Empiricism (en- peiran; to try something for yourself): The doctrine that all knowledge must come through the senses; there are no innate ideas born within us that only require to be remembered (ie, Plato). All knowledge is reducible to sensation, that is, our concepts are only sense images. In short, there is no knowledge other than that obtained by sense observation. Remember that according to Descartes, what I know first and foremost are my ideas. It is only later that he seeks to know if the extramental world exists, and so he begins with his ideas and then moves towards real being (rather than vice versa)....   [tags: Empiricists, Empiricism]

Free Essays
1350 words | (3.9 pages) | Preview

Plato 's Theory Of Knowledge And Right Opinion

- Plato distinguish and justify his distinction between knowledge and right opinion in a psychological way by a structure called rational soul. From his point, there are three parts into this rational soul. The three are the appetites, the spirited, and the mind. Plato uses all tree to distinguish between genuine knowledge and right opinion. Whenever it is time to make a genuine decision and opinion, he depends on his mind. In times in which you need to answer a question of preference, it is usually to use common sense on answering this....   [tags: Mind, Psychology, Reason, Soul]

Better Essays
855 words | (2.4 pages) | Preview

Knowledge Management & Innovation Theory

- Knowledge Management and Innovation Theory Introduction Arguably, world economy in the recent post-industrial times can be said to be an information-intensive atmosphere. A good number of scholars assert that, competition both in global and local market, distinction of the market place, as well as profitability is influenced by efficient knowledge. There are numerous definitions that have been put forward to explain the term ‘knowledge’, depending on the area in which it is applied. In this particular context or rather in the business context, the term ‘knowledge’ is used to refer to the state of being aware and able to understand specifics, truth, or information that is achieved through lea...   [tags: Business Management ]

Term Papers
2226 words | (6.4 pages) | Preview

Plato's Theory of Human Knowledge

- Plato's Theory of Human Knowledge Plato contended that all true knowledge is recollection. He stated that we all have innate knowledge that tells us about the things we experience in our world. This knowledge, Plato believed, was gained when the soul resided in the invisible realm, the realm of The Forms and The Good. Plato's theory of The Forms argued that everything in the natural world is representative of the ideal of that form. For example, a table is representative of the ideal form Table....   [tags: Papers]

Good Essays
651 words | (1.9 pages) | Preview

Aristotle 's Theory : Everyday Knowledge Demanding

- Aristotle’s theory makes everyday knowledge demanding. The type of insight into the good that is needed and the relation between practical wisdom and qualities of character are both complex. Practical wisdom cannot be taught, but requires understanding of life and virtue. Only the person who is good knows what is good, according to Aristotle. Aristotle argues that practical wisdom involves more than one kind of insight. First, there is insight into what is good or bad for man. Second, practical wisdom involves understanding what is required in a particular situation in light of a general understanding of what is good....   [tags: Virtue, Ethics, Morality, Virtue ethics]

Strong Essays
1250 words | (3.6 pages) | Preview

Comparing the Approaches of Rationalism and Empiricism Towards a Theory of Knowledge

- Comparing the Approaches of Rationalism and Empiricism Towards a Theory of Knowledge Rationalism ----------- Rene Descartes was the main rationalist. He said he believed he had to doubt everything known to him to really understand knowledge. Rationalism first began in Ancient Greece with two extreme rationalists - Parmenides and Zeno. Rationalists believed in innate ideas - ones that are present at birth, in the mind. When Descartes started his thoughts, it was in the 17th century, during the rise of science....   [tags: Papers]

Good Essays
986 words | (2.8 pages) | Preview

Does the Causal Theory of Knowledge Solve the Gettier Problem?

- The purpose of this paper is to argue that Alvin Goldman's paper "A Causal Theory of Knowing" does not solve the problem in Edmund Gettier's paper "Is Justified True Belief Knowledge?" To argue the old view of knowledge, Gettier presents a case in which a Subject (S) is justified in believing that a proposition (P) and P entails another proposition (Q). S deduces Q from P and accepts Q. Then S is justified in believing Q. In the first Case that Gettier presents however, P is falsely justified, but Q is a true justified belief: Smith (S) is justified in believing that Jones is the man who will get the job and Jones has ten coins in his pocket (P)....   [tags: Philosophy]

Good Essays
467 words | (1.3 pages) | Preview

Democratic Theory and Public Opinion: How Children Develop Their Political Knowledge

- Public opinion holds special importance in regards to a democratic government due to the different aspects that can influence the decisions of political leaders. For a democratic government to reach its full potential, there must be tolerance among citizens regarding points of view and rules, a basic understanding of values and goals, meaningful participation among citizens, and a sense of trust for their fellow citizens and government. Political actions can only be effective and the government can only provide trust within the American public by providing a response to their interests through public opinion....   [tags: government, democracy, knowledge]

Strong Essays
1149 words | (3.3 pages) | Preview

What Did Orem Help The Nursing World? A Novice 's Perspective

- What did Orem contribute to the nursing world. A novice’s perspective Introduction Dorothea E. Orem (1914-2007), a nursing theorist best-known for her influential work on self-care theory, has had a profound, ongoing impact on nursing practice, education and research (Hartweg 1991, p. 36-42; Alligood & Marriner-Tomey 2006, p. 256). Through her work, Orem defines nursing from several aspects, presenting a conceptualized nursing framework. Beyond that, her self-care deficits model is favoured by clinicians, and serves as guidelines for nursing practice as well as for in-depth research (Hinchliff & Schober 1995, p....   [tags: Nursing, Nursing theory, Knowledge]

Better Essays
1264 words | (3.6 pages) | Preview

The Knowledge About Race and The Whiteness Theory

- One day while watching the history channel I noticed that the main focus of the history was either on the evolved development of science or the Caucasian race. In that moment I asked myself, what did I know about my own history besides slavery and all the historic events after that. I became upset with the fact that I came up with nothing on the history on African Americans before slavery. In my 21 years of life I have took a total of 12 history classes and none them talked about African American history before slavery....   [tags: african americans, caucasian race]

Strong Essays
1169 words | (3.3 pages) | Preview

Subject-Object Relation in Mullâ Sadrâ’s Theory of Knowledge

- Subject-Object Relation in Mullâ Sadrâ’s Theory of Knowledge ABSTRACT: Dividing knowledge to knowledge by presence and knowledge by representation, Mullâ Sadrâ treats the subject-object relation with regard to each one of them differently. In the former, the subject is united with the object, or rather they are one, and the reality of knowledge is this very unity. In this type of knowledge, there is no medium. Such unity culminates, on the one hand, in knowledge by presence comprehensively and completely conveying the objective reality, and in its untransferability on the other....   [tags: Philosophy Philosophical Papers]

Free Essays
3078 words | (8.8 pages) | Preview

Knowledge Throughout History: The Ptolemaic Theory

- As humans, our drive for acquiring knowledge can be seen as a reward to humanity. We constantly learn new things everyday which adds on to our initial knowledge, thus knowledge is indefinite. New information being acquired can cause us to reevaluate our initial views about the world we live in. In the context of this question, knowledge can be defined as the process of gaining information from past experiences. The collection of scraps and fragments is the facts, opinions, or just information we gain from knowledge....   [tags: information, scientists, historians]

Strong Essays
1350 words | (3.9 pages) | Preview

A Theory Of Basic Beliefs And Non Inferential Knowledge

- In this essay, I will aim to establish why the foundationalist response to the epistemic regress does not succeed. I will first outline the epistemic regress, discussing the four possible outcomes, and where foundationalism stands amongst them. I will then ascertain the foundationalist response, establishing the concept of basic beliefs and non-inferential knowledge. I will also discuss different forms of foundationalism and different interpretations of basic beliefs. I will finish by discussing why I believe the response does not succeed, explaining why I find non-inferential justification problematic....   [tags: Epistemology, Foundationalism]

Better Essays
1029 words | (2.9 pages) | Preview

Water Management, By Barbosa, Fernandes, And David ( 2012 )

- The theme of these two papers is water management, and each presents different aspects of this issue. The paper by Fratini, Elle, Jensen, and Mikkelsen (2012), presents a case for developing a new system to implement sustainable technology to combat climate change. This system includes examining macro knowledge first through understanding institutions, secondly understanding the meso level of knowledge by interpreting networks, and finally understanding the micro level of individual opinions. This theory was mainly formed through reviewing current literature and doing filed work in Denmark and Norway....   [tags: Scientific method, Theory, Knowledge, Management]

Better Essays
800 words | (2.3 pages) | Preview

Plato 's Theory Of Human Nature, Knowledge And Political Order

- The question asked is using Plato’s theory of human nature, knowledge and political order explain and evaluate the answer to this question: Why is being just good for me. Before I can answer the question posed I have to answer a sub question what is being just even mean. To us in modern times being a just person means if I hit a parked car I leave my insurance and contact information or I see a person who is in need of something and I help them well if someone’s watching you. In my opinion all being just means today is nothing more than doing the right thing when a camera is pointed in your direction, when someone is watching you, when you can benefit from it or you can tweet or post it on F...   [tags: Plato, Soul, Virtue, Morality]

Better Essays
872 words | (2.5 pages) | Preview

The Educational Philosophy of Neil Postman and John Dewey

- Postman says that if education is to survive, it must have an end. In this essay, we will discuss what these ends are, and how they compare with the “ends” of John Dewey. Dewey believes that it is the very nature of life is to strive to continue being alive, and that education is the most important way to achieve that. Postman says that the learning process should never really ever end. These two educational philosophers, when you examine them, actually have similar theories. Neil Postman says “To put it simply, there us no surer way to bring an end to education, than for education to have no end”(Postman,4)....   [tags: Theory of Knowledge]

Free Essays
499 words | (1.4 pages) | Preview

Knowledge And Organizational Theory

- 1.0 What is a Learning Organization. 1.1 Definition of a Learning Organization Just what makes a learning organization. In this sense the learning organization is an ideal, ‘towards which organizations have to evolve in order to be able to respond to the various pressures they face . It clearly portrays that it is essential to learn individually as well as in a collective manner. Learning organizations are organizations where people continually expand their capacity to create the results they truly desire, where new and expansive patterns of thinking are nurtured, where collective aspiration is set free, and where people are continually learning to see the whole together....   [tags: Business Organization Strategy]

Free Essays
1665 words | (4.8 pages) | Preview

John Dewey's View of Science

- Science is very near the core of everything that Dewey said regarding society, education, philosophy, and human beings. Typical of his overall approach to science is his statement that "Ultimately and philosophically, science is the organ of general social progress." According to Dewey, only the scientific method allows for maximum possible comprehensiveness, is the only one compatible with the democratic way of life, lends itself to public scrutiny, and is the method of intelligence. Because of these views, Dewy incorporates the scientific method into all disciplines of life....   [tags: Theory of Knowledge]

Free Essays
500 words | (1.4 pages) | Preview

How Napoleon Was A Master Of Persuasion

- According to Manning and Curtis (2016), a successful leader has the ability to master the art of persuasion. Moreover, when leaders are able to master the art of persuasion leaders are able to understand people, use words effectively, and manage conflict (Manning & Curtis, 2016). Manning and Curtis (2016) discussed how Napoleon Bonaparte was a master of persuasion because he understood people. Napoleon would determine what people wanted most and consequently do everything in his power to help them get it (Manning & Curtis, 2016)....   [tags: Management, Regulatory Focus Theory, Knowledge]

Better Essays
727 words | (2.1 pages) | Preview

Epistemology And The Philosophical Perspective

- “The wisest of all humans is he or she who knows that they know nothing.”-Socrates Epistemology, simply put is the study of knowledge. It looks at how we know, what we know, and do we really know anything at all. Knowledge is the foundation of any sound argument, and is used to get at the “truth” of things. In this paper, I will discuss epistemology and further explain it by relating it to something that I use to believe to be true that I no longer do. As defined in the Oxford Dictionary, epistemology is “The theory of knowledge, especially with regard to its methods, validity, and scope....   [tags: Epistemology, Knowledge, Theory of justification]

Better Essays
831 words | (2.4 pages) | Preview

The Theories Of Knowledge : Developmentalism And Constructivism That Support His Constructive Developmental Theory

- Robert Kegan states there are two theories of knowledge: developmentalism and constructivism that support his constructive-developmental theory. Developmentalism “proposes that the way in which people make meaning can develop over time and across the lifespan. (Kegan 18-5). Humans are constantly developing and will continue to develop. Kegan says there are six stages of development in which adolescent and adults develop. For adolescence and adulthood stages 2-4 are the most important which includes imperial, interpersonal, and self-authoring orders (Kegan 18-5)....   [tags: Psychology, Big Five personality traits]

Better Essays
1353 words | (3.9 pages) | Preview

The Process of Acquiring a Mother Tongue and a Second Language

- Having in mind that this investigation is going to be carried out with a group of first graders aged between six and seven years old, and that they are in the stage of life in which learners are in the process of acquiring their mother tongue (L1) and a second language (L2) as well; this theory will allow to identify the characteristics of a learner in this stage of the acquisition process. As it is stated in Saville-Troike (2006, p. 2) “The scope of SLA includes informal L2 learning that takes place in naturalistic contexts, formal L2 learning that takes place in classrooms and L2 learning that involves a mixture of these settings and circumstances”....   [tags: learners, knowledge, theory]

Good Essays
528 words | (1.5 pages) | Preview

Personal Expectations From The Field Of Volunteer Management

- Today, volunteerism and the growing field of volunteer management continue to reflect close associations with adult education (Pinnington and Schugurensky, 2010:112). We individuals engage in a reflective process for a number of reasons. It can be to develop strategies in order for survival or an inability to build up life skills learning from our own past experience (Jasper, 2003:4). Additionally, stated by Rodriguez and Casas (2012) reflective is a vital tool in professional development and in practice-based professional learning situations....   [tags: Learning, Knowledge, Learning theory, Psychology]

Better Essays
1096 words | (3.1 pages) | Preview

Personal Development Of Health And Social Care Setting

- This reflection has been written to explore my own attitude regarding learning and how it affects my personal development in the health and social care setting. I will introduce my preferred learning style. I will analyse difficulties which can occur with learning and present personal strategies to overcome them. I will be implementing different theories to underpin my strategies and to analyse their reliability. There are a variety of domains of learning in health and social care such as Bloom’s Taxonomy of the cognitive domain; “this includes knowledge and the resulting development of intellectual skills....   [tags: Learning, Knowledge, Learning theory, Skill]

Better Essays
1583 words | (4.5 pages) | Preview

The Excision Of Redivac Drain

- The permission to conduct the teaching on the excision of Redivac drain was obtained and recommended by the National Medical Council (NMC) board. As such, this assignment conformed to the medical teaching standards of NMC. The secondary sources of information were used in teaching the Redivac drain excision skill (Cowan, Norman, and Coopamah, 2005). It is because; the secondary sources provided a cyclical model of integrated skills, which ensures that the learner is in a position to redo partly or all the aspects of the cycle, based on the learning evaluation....   [tags: Learning, Knowledge, Skill, Learning theory]

Better Essays
1509 words | (4.3 pages) | Preview

To What Extent is Knowledge Provisional

- Knowledge has a preliminary definition which is that it is justified true belief. Due to its dynamic nature, knowledge is subject to review and revision over time. Although, we may believe we have objective facts from various perceptions over time, such facts become re-interpreted in light of improved evidence, findings or technology and instigates new knowledge. This raises the questions, To what extent is knowledge provisional. and In what ways does the rise of new evidence give us a good reason to discard our old knowledge....   [tags: theory of relativism, science, laws]

Strong Essays
1335 words | (3.8 pages) | Preview

What Is Absolute Synthetic Knowledge?

- One of the longstanding questions in scientific philosophy is whether absolute synthetic knowledge can be attained. Is it ever possible for our scientific theories to truly describe the world as it is. If so, how can we know when we have reached the point of truth. Two schools of thought exist that pertain to these questions. The infallibilist believes that absolute synthetic knowledge is attainable, and that any currently held theory cannot be deposed by a competitor theory. This viewpoint was held by many before the advancement of the theory of general relativity in the 1920s, after which the fallibilist viewpoint became the prominent school of thought, and still dominates philosophical a...   [tags: Scientific method, Science, Theory, Epistemology]

Better Essays
1076 words | (3.1 pages) | Preview

The History Of The Nursing Knowledge Development

- Learning the history of the nursing knowledge development, gives us an understanding and appreciation of the challenges nursing faced in the past, current nursing practice, and the future of nursing. Chinn and Kramer (2015) concur by stating that, “If nurses do not know their history, they cannot value it; when nurses do not value history, they cannot learn and grow from what it teaches.” (p. 24). Nursing has existed since the beginning of time and continues today. In the beginning, rituals, ceremonies, and charms influenced nursing....   [tags: Nursing, Nursing practice, Nurse, Nursing theory]

Strong Essays
1424 words | (4.1 pages) | Preview

Knowledge Confidence Pl Development And Application

- Knowledge Confidence Plan: Development and Application Fundamental to nursing theory is the concept of the nurse as a ‘knower’; moreover, the concept of ‘knowing’ translates into relational inquiry and practice. Each person is situated in a unique perspective that cultivates a lens from which one views the world. ADD QUOTE Nurses orientate their practice within this unique realm; and from there, practice from a perspective of ‘knowing’ and ‘non-knowing’. The purpose of this paper is to analyze myself as a knower and how this perspective interplays within my nursing practice....   [tags: Nursing, Nursing theory, Nursing practice]

Better Essays
1063 words | (3 pages) | Preview

The Theory And Its Effects On The Classroom

- As I walked around observing the groups, I realized this was real to them and they were making connections to their life. This was at a school in the Madison City district and many of the student’s parents were engineers or worked in a field related to science. The knowledge they developed was driven by a curiosity they had, driven by a connection created between their understanding of what their parent did and what they were doing. The fact that it was fun, interesting, and challenging helped too, but their knowledge, and mine, went from knowing nothing about the different chemicals and their effects to having a pretty complex understanding, at least by AMSTI chemical test standards....   [tags: Education, Knowledge, Educational psychology]

Better Essays
1185 words | (3.4 pages) | Preview

These results are sorted by most relevant first (ranked search). You may also sort these by color rating or essay length.


Your search returned over 400 essays for "theory of knowledge"
1  2  3  4  5    Next >>