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Fraud : The Sarbanes Oxley Act

- In the early 2000s, fraud was a major issue that was becoming more and more frequent. In an attempt to dissuade frauds, the government passed the Sarbanes Oxley Act, created the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, and issued the Statement of Auditing Standards 99. These costly reforms sought to improve financial disclosures from organizations, establish audit standards, inspect accounting firms, and enforce compliance with all rules highlighted by the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. However, fraud occurrence has not been impacted....   [tags: Enron, Fraud, Sarbanes–Oxley Act, Kenneth Lay]

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The Sarbanes Oxley Act :

- Running Head: The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 John Webb FINC 620 Jason Ma, MBA, DBA Table of Contents The Sarbanes-Oxley Act 3 Negative Effects of SOX 4 Changes in Education, Post-SOX 5 Conclusion 6 References 7 The Sarbanes-Oxley Act The Sarbanes-Oxley Act, also known as the Public Company Accounting Reform and Investor Protection Act of 2002, was a congressional retort to a plethora of major corporate and accounting scandals that included companies such as Enron, Tyco International, Adelphia, Peregrine Systems, HealthSouth, and WorldCom....   [tags: Internal control, Enron, Sarbanes–Oxley Act]

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Details of the Sarbanes Oxley Act 2002

- An auditor’s role in an audit is very important. An auditor must be able to collect enough evidence to supports their finding, and also be on the lookout for fraud. Company’s may or may not know the law, but it is the job to know the law, and be able to educate and report findings properly. Since the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, there have been provisions that have directly affected auditors. This paper will include the details of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, how ethics and independence have affected auditors, as well implementation of new standards based on the Sarbanes-Oxley Act....   [tags: auditor, sarbanes oxley act, auditing]

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Internal Controls and the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

- In order to be successful in business, a company must be able to track their assets. This tracking system is typically done by a bookkeeper and must be reliable in order to be effective. The way a company ensures their financial records are reliable is by setting up a system of internal controls. Internal controls allow a company to protect its assets from fraud and theft as well as ensuring records are kept accurately by reducing errors and irregularities (Keisco, Kimmel and Weygandt, 2008)....   [tags: Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002]

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Sarbanes Oxley Act of 2004

- Sarbanes Oxley Act of 2004 The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 was signed into law on July 30, 2002 by President Bush. The new law came after major corporate scandals involving Enron, Arthur Anderson, WorldCom. Its goals are to protect investors by improving accuracy of and reliability of corporate disclosures and to restore investor confidence. The law is considered the most important change in securities and corporate law since the New Deal. The act is named after Senator Paul Sarbanes of Maryland and Representative Michael Oxley of Ohio (Wikipedia Online)....   [tags: Investment Investor Sarbanes Oxley Essays Papers]

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Internal Controls and the Sarbanes-Oxley Act

- Internal controls are in place to protect entities against theft from dishonest workers and outside predators. They are also an accurate series of checks and balances and are in place to find discrepancies. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (SOX) was named after Senator Paul Sarbanes and Michael Oxley. The Act has 11 titles and there are about six areas that are considered very important. (Sox, 2006) The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 made publicly traded United States companies create internal controls....   [tags: SOX Act]

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The Sarbanes-Oxley Act: Internal Controls

- When operating a business having internal controls protects the corporation from internal and external theft along with ensuring employees within the company are acting ethically and within the law. Internal controls set safeguards in place to discourage unauthorized use and theft from current employees and to reduce internal errors or irregularities in the accounting process, which could be construed as misrepresenting the true financial status of the company. The chances of a company employing a person who has the ability to steal money has been shown to be greater when there are no checks and balances to monitor the financial statements and to deter a normally honest person....   [tags: The SOX Act]

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The Sarbanes-Oxley Act: Internal Controls

- Businesses today are required to follow set guidelines and regulations when it comes to keeping and reporting business transactions. The goal of these guidelines and regulations is to ensure the accuracy of a business accounting reports and to also make sure that company assets are not misappropriated or misused by its employees. Internal controls within a company fall under various categories; in this paper I will discuss the establishment of responsibility, physical, mechanical, and electronic controls, segregation of duties, and independent internal verification....   [tags: SOX Act]

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The Sarbanes Oxley Act ( Sox )

- The Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX) was ratified on July 30, 2002 (Shaw and Terando,177). This act came after the financial crises during the early 2000’s. According to Bolton, following these corporate scandals in the early 2000’s, the government took a hard look at the different regulations on companies and how we can prevent what happened from happening again. Thus, came the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. SOX was created to decrease corporate fraud. This act especially looked at the role of accounting in corporations and thus also formed the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB) to supervise the accounting industry....   [tags: Internal control, Auditing]

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The Sarbanes Oxley Act ( Sox )

- On July 30, 2002, the passage of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX) was enacted to introduce major changes to accounting practices in the United States. The act was enacted in reaction to a number of accounting scandals committed by major companies such as Enron and Worldcom. The act is named after Sarbanes–Oxley was named after sponsors U.S. Senator Paul Sarbanes, a Democrat from Maryland, and U.S. Representative Michael G. Oxley, a Republican from Ohio. The House of Representatives agreed upon the act, with a vote of 423 in favor, 3 opposed, and 8 abstaining....   [tags: Enron, Fraud, Arthur Andersen, Kenneth Lay]

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The Sarbanes Oxley Act Of 2002

- The field of financial reporting tends to bore many people, until it makes the front page in a typically catastrophic fashion due to one scandal or another. While we are happy ignoring the important accounting function of reporting and auditing while that function works properly, as soon as it fails, we turn on corporations and the accountants that keep them running to call for justice and perhaps reform. Today, the accounting practices of publically-traded companies are governed by numerous regulations and requirements, among them the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (SOX), a piece of legislation introduced following a number of headline accounting scandals at companies like Enron and WorldCom (H...   [tags: Internal control, Auditing, Audit]

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The Ethics Of The Sarbanes Oxley Act

- Introduction “Talk about ethics values, integrity and social responsibility is not only becoming acceptable in business community, it’s practically required” (Joyner, 2002, p.298). Revising the literature in which ethical standards are fundamental for the operation of business today, it’s definitely worthwhile to recognize the industry’s concern for the welfare of society and the growing demand for managing business ethically and responsibly. After Enron’s corporate unlawful activity, and other companies misconduct, such as WorldCom and Halliburton, the government and the public sector start to look for fresh methods to support ethical behavior....   [tags: Ethics, Business ethics]

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The Sarbanes Oxley Act Of 2002

- Ethicality, or the lack of, plays a large part in the broad spectrum of business. It is the duty of every business person to conform to a certain code of ethics. Because of scandals in regard to ethicality, such as Enron, WorldCom, and TYCO, The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 was passed in order to create a better system of promoting and supervising the ethicality of all businesses and their employees. “In compliance with the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, in 2003 the NYSE (2009) and the NASDAQ (2009) issued new corporate governance rules that require their listed companies to adopt and disclose a code of business conduct and ethics....   [tags: Ethics, Business ethics, Corporate governance]

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Benefits of the Sarbanes Oxley Act

- Internal controls are measures put into place that allow for more accurate and deliberate representation of a company’s financial data. Internal controls also serve to protect a company’s assets from theft, fraud or misuse. With internal controls in place it becomes more visible to recognize if someone is stealing or misusing funds in any way. Internal controls also help to zoom in on errors or unintentional mistakes. When these errors are picked up on early it eliminates future problems for the company and its investors down the road....   [tags: Business Controls, Internal Controls]

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Sarbanes Oxley Act Of 2002

- Sarbanes–Oxley Act Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 Long title The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (often shortened to SOX) is legislation passed by the U.S. Congress to protect shareholders and the general public from accounting errors and fraudulent practices in the enterprise, as well as improve the accuracy of corporate disclosures. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) administers the act, which sets deadlines for compliance and publishes rules on requirements. Nicknames Sarbanes-Oxley, Sarbox, SOX Enacted by the 107th United States Congress Citations Public law Pub.L....   [tags: U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission]

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Enron And The Sarbanes Oxley Act

- Prior to watching the movie "The Smartest Guys in the Room" and learning in class in depth about the Enron scandal and the counterparts that had hands in it I didn 't know much about it nor the effects it had on the way companies are regulated today. Prior knowledge of the Enron case was learned in my auditing class but only briefly to provide an introduction to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act passed in 2002 by Congress to protect investors from the possibility of fraudulent accounting activities by corporations....   [tags: Enron, Enron scandal]

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The Sarbanes Oxley Act Of 2002

- With increasing frequency; the news is reporting many new fraud investigations and cases. The positive side of these fraud reports shows that people are getting caught. Many times it takes years of fraudulent activity to occur before the individual is caught. Billions of dollars are lost by companies and individuals every year. However; in more recent years, companies and individuals are learning more about how and why fraud occurs. For a company; the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002; has aided in the detection of fraudulent activity (Bumgardner, 2003)....   [tags: Criminal law, Jury, Trial]

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The Sarbanes Oxley Act Of 2002

- 1. DESCRIBE REQUIREMENT OF AUDIT COMMITTEE IN SOX The Sarbanes-Oxley act of 2002 supports the increase of public confidence in capital markets by looking for the improvement of corporate governance, internal controls and audit quality. Basic requirements for sox audit committee can be classified into five key parts such as authority and responsibility, purchasing services from the independent registered public accounting firm/ outside audit, retaining auditors, materials available, disclosure related to its operations....   [tags: Auditing, Audit, Financial audit]

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The Sarbanes Oxley Act Of 2002

- In addition to internal control reform, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (SOX) redefined governance requirements for U.S. reporting companies. SOX provided for stricter requirements of the audit committee by enhancing the board’s responsibilities. The audit committee is directly responsible for appointing and overseeing the work performed by a company’s external auditor. In addition, because the audit committee is required to communicate closely with the external auditors, the committee is required to have independent members of the board of directors as well as to appoint a financial expert....   [tags: Internal control, Auditing, Audit]

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Enron And The Sarbanes Oxley Act

- In today’s business world, accountants and business owners should work together in order to become aware of scandals that occur in corporate companies. Since 2008 a series of corporate scandals and collapses have highlighted the importance of effective board oversight. With the increase in technological advances and people who never invested before, began to invest in companies in the mid 1990’s to early 2000, which increased the demands for many corporate organizations. One of the largest scandals in the corporate world was known as the Madoff’s Ponzi scheme and the scandals that occurred at Enron Corporation and WorldCom....   [tags: Fraud, Audit]

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Sarbanes Oxley Act Of 2002

- . The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 was created to protect investors from potential fraudulent activities from corporations (The Data Governance Institue). The Sarbanes-Oxley was created after issues such as Enron occurred. The motivation of this act was to hold CEOs and other corporation officials responsible and of the financial situations their company was in. The idea that corporations would record false number with their financial results was not only dishonest, but would cost the stakeholders a great amount of money (The Data Governance Institue)....   [tags: Information security, Computer security, Security]

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The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

- The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 is the most significant Federal law that impacts public companies to be introduced since the Securities Acts of 1933 and 1934. This legislation set new or enhanced standards for all U.S. public company Board of Directors, top management, and the public accounting firms that audit public companies. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (“SOX”) was introduced in response to a number of accounting scandals around the turn of the millennium, including Enron, Tyco, and WorldCom....   [tags: United States federal law]

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The Sarbanes - Oxley Act

- The Sarbanes – Oxley Act was pronounced in July 2002, which included eleven chapters and 68 clauses. This act has very important impact on corporate governance. Among all the sections, section 404 is the most complicated, most contested, and most expensive to implement. The importance of internal control is raised and strictly ruled in section 404. Section 404 mandates that all public companies should establish internal control frames and procedures and ensure effective internal control. Under this section, management’s responsibility is required for establishing and maintaining internal control over financial reporting for the company....   [tags: Internal control, Audit, Finance, Auditing]

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About the Sarbanes-Oxley Act

- Between the years 2000 and 2002 there were over a dozen corporate scandals involving unethical corporate governance practices. The allegations ranged from faulty revenue reporting and falsifying financial records, to the shredding and destruction of financial documents (Patsuris, 2002). Most notably, are the cases involving Enron and Arthur Andersen. The allegations of the Enron scandal went public in October 2001. They included, hiding debt and boosting profits to the tune of more than one billion dollars....   [tags: Corporate Fraud, Business Ethics ]

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Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

- Ethics continues to be a hot issue in the business world. The focus on business ethics grew after several significant business scandals beginning in the millennium. These scandals prompted the government to pass new accounting regulations to increase the control and accuracy of financial reporting. A prominent piece of legislation is the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, which applies to publicly traded businesses. The basis of Sarbanes-Oxley is to increase the reliability and accuracy of financial reporting (Noreen)....   [tags: Business Ethics]

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The Sarbanes-Oxley Act

- There are so many organizations today that are using the Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX) legislation that helps to safeguard their company and their financial records. The Sarbanes-Oxley act began in 2002 and the purpose behind this act was to protect organizations, it had a major impact on accounting and record keeping. Because of Enron, they passed this act for publicly-traded corporations to better implement control to their enterprise data. “Named after Senator Paul Sarbanes and Representative Michael Oxley, who also set a number of deadlines for compliance” (SOX Law )....   [tags: Business Management ]

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The Sarbanes-Oxley Act

- Introduction The Sarbanes-Oxley Act, or SOX Act, was enacted on July 30, 2002. Since it was enacted that summer it has changed how the public business handle their accounting and auditing. The federal law was made coming off of a number of large corporations involved in scandals. For example a company like Enron was caught in accounting fraud in late 2001 when the company was using false financial statements. Once Enron was caught that had many lawsuits filed against them and had to file for bankruptcy....   [tags: government, accounting, auditing]

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The Sarbanes-Oxley Act

- Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX) Name Name of Institution Introduction The Sarbanes-Oxley Act is a legislation aimed at increasing the accuracy of financial statements that were issued by companies that are publicly held (Livingstone, 2011). The passing of this act was a response to some of the financial malpractices that took place at companies such as WorldCom and Enron. According to Livingstone, making ethical decisions is critical because ethical lapses can lead to severe unforeseen consequences (Livingstone, 2011)....   [tags: Legislation, Financial Malpractice]

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Financial Reporting : The Sarbanes Oxley Act

- Investors’ confidence was shaken in the wake of early 2000 scandals that included Enron and WorldCom (Curtis, 2014). Congress hoped to instill confidence back into investors by creating an act that would create a more stringent way of financial reporting. After nearly 14 years of implementation of The Sarbanes Oxley Act, the benefits it has provided to investors are considerable, however there are areas in which SOX does lack its stringencies. Understanding Sarbanes Oxley Investors’ confidence was shaken in the wake of early 2000 scandals that included Enron and WorldCom....   [tags: Corporate governance, Enron, Board of directors]

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An Important Part Of The Sarbanes Oxley Act

- An important part of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act is the creation of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board. According to the SEC, the PCAOB is designed to oversee accounting professionals who provide independent audit reports for publicly traded companies. According to section 101 of the Sarbanes Oxley Act (2002), the PCAOB has the power to register public accounting firms that prepare audit reports for public companies, set auditing standards for public companies, conduct inspections of PCAOB registered firms, and enforce auditing standards through sanctions or fines of firms (Donaldson, 2003)....   [tags: Internal control, Auditing, Audit]

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The Sarbanes-Oxley Act

- The misrepresentation of corporate finances has been a frequent news headline during the last ten years, and the negative impact of these actions has had a severe impact on the economy. The temptation can be overwhelming for corporate leaders to step over the legal line in attempts to maximize corporate earnings, which also affects their financial compensation. Companies that ultimately collapse from these inappropriate financial behaviors, eventually put a heavy burden on the economy and many sectors of society....   [tags: Finance]

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History Of Sarbanes Oxley Act Of 2002

- History of The Sarbanes-Oxley Act The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002(SOX) is a United States federal law. This act was signed into law on July 30, 2002, in response to several corporate scandals that went on in the early 2000s. The scandals included corporations such as ENRON, Worldcom, and Tyco. In the mid-90s, the economy was flourishing. Stock averages rose at increasing rates. New technological advancements and changes in investing brought millions of people and their savings into the stock markets for the first time....   [tags: Enron, Finance, Public company]

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Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX)

- Introduction In July of 2002, Congress swiftly passed the Public Company Accounting Reform and Investors Protection Act at the time when corporations like Arthur Anderson, Enron and WorldCom fell due to fraudulent accounting practices and bad internal control. This bill, sponsored by Mike Oxley (R-OH) and Paul Sarbanes (D-MD), became known as Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX).It sought to restore public confidence in publicly traded companies and their accounting practices, though the companies listed above were prosecuted on laws that were already in place before SOX....   [tags: accounting, cost, law, efficiency, market, economy]

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Critique of the Effectiveness of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act

- Background George W. Bush called the SOX Act “the most far-reaching reforms of American business practices since the time of Franklin Delano Roosevelt”. It has been a decade since the Sarbanes-Oxley Act became in effect. Obviously, the SOX Act which aimed at increasing the confidence in the US capital market really has had a profound influence on public companies and public accounting firms. However, after Enron scandal which triggered the issue of SOX Act, public company lawsuits due to fraud still emerged one after another....   [tags: Indirect Costs, Managerial Diversion]

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Effects of Regulation with the Sarbanes-Oxley Act

- The Oxford dictionary states that fraud is the “wrongful or criminal deception intended to result in financial or personal gain” (Oxford University Press, 2014). It is arguable that only individuals have the ability to engage in fraud, but these individuals may lead corporations, which allows corporations also to commit acts of fraud. From a high-level perspective for combating this issue, many governments build a regulatory environment that interacts through firms and individuals. This regulatory environment exists as a series of laws and directives on the various government entities interact to ensure this protection....   [tags: ethical behavior, laws, regulations]

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Overview of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX)

- The Sarbanes-Oxley Act, frequently known as the SOX. The act was passed on in 2002 as a federal United States law. The law was drafted in response to the numerous numbers of financial scandals performed by high profile corporations such as Johnson & Johnson. The action has created a new company standard of responsibility in order to protect the valued stakeholders, as well as the public, from the deceitful practices of various organizations. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act...   [tags: federal US law, financial scandals]

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The Sarbanes-Oxley Act: Protecting Corporate Assets

- Internal Controls. Kind of like a brick wall, or a fire wall on a computer. Internal controls act as a way to keep a company and its assets safe, as well as make sure that the company maintains complete and accurate accounting records. Internal controls are in charge of the overall well being of a company from its assets to its employees, even to its sales and reputation. A lot of things are involved with internal controls such as; Sarbanes-Oxley Act, stock well being, well being and safety of assets and accounting accuracy....   [tags: SOX Act, Internal Controls]

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The Detrimental Effects of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act

- In 2002, Senator Paul Sarbanes (a Democrat from Maryland) and Congressman Michael Oxley (a Republican from Ohio) crossed the aisle to develop a new law to further regulate the accounting, auditing and financial reporting of companies publicly traded in United States. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (SOX) (also known as the Public Company Accounting Reform and Investor Protection Act of 2002) passed because of the demand of the American people to see reform in response to the widely publicized instances of fraud and corruption in large US companies....   [tags: fraud, corruption, financial scandals]

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A Brief Note On The Sarbanes Oxley Act

- Auditing has become quite a challenge in recent years due to all the fraud scandals that has been going on. Such is the case that government was required to intervene and created the Sarbanes-Oxley Act; one of most significant reforms related to public companies since 1934. Modern corporations aren’t ran by their sole proprietors anymore but by managers whose job is to protect their interest. Particularly this is one of the reasons why the demand of auditing arose due to the natural conflict of interest between the owner and the manager....   [tags: Internal control, Audit, Auditing]

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Social Responsibility And The Sarbanes Oxley Act

- Introduction All successful organizations have a social responsibility to their stakeholders. This includes everyone who may be involved with the business. Shareholders and employees rely on the success of the business due to their personal investment in the company. The customers and the community also desire a socially responsible organization for their personal needs such as access to cheap quality goods and a thriving environment. Social responsibility to stakeholders has governmental oversight and laws which must be complied with....   [tags: Social responsibility]

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Enron Scandal Of The Sarbanes Oxley Act

- Jamie Dimon once said that “doing first class business in a first class way” has led to all of his success at J.P. Morgan because building a business does not only mean to build on profits, but also to make sure business is being done in an ethical way. Enron Corporation, once a great accounting firm, fell under its own weight as it was reaching for greatness. Former CEO Kenneth Lay, made a commitment to business ethics based on communication, integrity, respect, and excellence. However, a once successful American energy, commodities, and financial risk service company made questionable financial practices that ultimately led to their downfall....   [tags: Enron, Kenneth Lay, Jeffrey Skilling]

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Safeguarding Assets: The SOX Act

- What is internal control. According to University of Phoenix, Axia College Internal Control and Cash (2009), internal control is all of the related methods and measures adopted within an organization to safeguard its assets and enhance the accuracy and reliability of its accounting records. The primary reasons for internal control are help companies protect their investments and merchandise against theft from everyone, including employees and to make sure that the accounting is done correctly and truthfully....   [tags: The Sarbanes- Oxley Act of 2002]

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The Sarbanes Oxley ( Sox ) Act Of 2002

- The large accounting scandals at Enron, Tyco, and WorldCom amongst others prompted the U.S. government to take action. That action happened in the form of the Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX) Act of 2002. Dubbed after U.S. Senator Paul Sarbanes and Representative Michael Oxley, it ordered a number of reformations to improve corporate liability, improve financial disclosures and fight corporate and accounting scams, and created the "Public Company Accounting Oversight Board," also known as the PCAOB, to supervise the actions of the auditing profession....   [tags: Internal control, Enron]

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Sarbanes Oxley- Investor Confidence Act

- The problem to be investigated is the purpose and exactitude of the investor confidence act entitled the Sarbanes Oxley Act. This act was created in 2002, to increase public confidence in the accuracy and transparency of public companies financial reports. (Jennings, 2012) This assessment and regulation act was created for the reason that corporate governance within many companies such as Enron, Lehman Brothers and other companies failed to act responsibly in regard to the public trust and were recognized as ethics violators....   [tags: Finance]

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The Sarbanes Oxley Act: Internal Controls Which Help Business

- Internal Controls are to be an integral part of any organization's financial and business policies and procedures. Internal controls consists of all the measures taken by the organization for the purpose of; (1) protecting its resources against waste, fraud, and inefficiency; (2) ensuring accuracy and reliability in accounting and operating data; (3) securing compliance with the policies of the organization; and (4) evaluating the level of performance in all organizational units of the organization....   [tags: The SOX Act]

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The Sarbanes Oxley Act of 2002

- H.R.3763 - The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 A lot has been made, perhaps without justification, of the July 30, 2002 passage of H.R. 3763, The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 ("Sarbanes-Oxley" or The Act). Having read the Act, I suspect that the great praise is unfounded. I intend to address three issues presented within the act. First, I will address stock options as considered (or neglected, as the case may be) by Sarbanes-Oxley. Second, I will address the creation of a Commission designed to oversee audits and corporate accounting practices, and the potential efficacy of this Commission....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Events Leading Up to the The Sarbanes-Oxley Act

- ... This act covered many important issues such as auditor independence, enhanced corporate disclosure, corporate and criminal board accountability, corporate fraud and accountability, and many more. Sarbanes-Oxley Act is very extensive, but Section 802 ‘Criminal Penalties For Altering Documents’ under Title VIII “Corporate and Criminal Fraud Accountability” is one the most important part of the act. This act mainly regulates corporations from altering the documents. Under section 802, Chapter 73 of title 18, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end section 1519 and 1520....   [tags: investment, scandal, accounting]

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The True Implementations and Effects of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act

- Introduction Ethics are characteristics or values that are not inherently instilled within individuals but are developed over a lifetime through experience. Ethical behavior is thereby a choice. According to Northcentral University’s Executive Concepts in Business Strategy, business ethics are “standards and guidelines regarding the conduct of commerce and apply to individuals, companies, and professions” (p. 543). By this definition, morals and ethical values are subjective to the decisions made by the persons involved in the business....   [tags: unethical behavior, business practices]

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The Sarbanes Oxley Act Of 2002, And Creation Of The Pcaob

- Before the Sarbanes-Oxley act of 2002 , and creation of the PCAOB, audit firms were permitted to provide a wide range of non audit services to audit clients including but not limited to; Internal audit services; AIS design and implementation; Other expert financial consulting services. As a result there was a greater incentive to overlook audit deficiencies in order to retain the clients for higher revenue generating service by being a comprehensive services provider. The PCAOB has the responsibility to oversee the audits of public companies, brokers and dealers....   [tags: Audit, Auditing, Internal control]

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Ethical Decision Making: The Sarbanes-Oxley Act

- Is ethics concerning decision making merely an accepted way of life, a trust factor, or a concern for reputation. Is ethical thinking and decision making conclusions right for one individual or firm and wrong for another. Do ethics encompass a universal concept or do they reside solely in an individual realm such as one’s Id or ego as Freud claimed. Finally, do acts such as The Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX) create a sound solution to the problem of ethical or non-ethical decision making in public firms....   [tags: Impact on Management]

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Account Management: Sarbanes Oxley Act of 2002

- Most jobs these days will have some sort of connection with ethics. People are held to higher standards especially when it comes to having a job with more responsibilities or heavy interactions with others. Many people are taught ethics in school about what is not only right and wrong but also what is morally “right” and “wrong”. When it comes to a profession in accounting you have even more standards and rules to work by. The Institute of Management Accountants has continued to distribute an updated guidance on ethical issues you could have while practicing....   [tags: standards and rules to work by]

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Sarbanes Oxley Act SOX

- After major corporate and accounting scandals like those that affected Tyco, Worldcom and Enron the Federal government passed a law known as the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 also known as the Public Company Accounting Reform and Investor Protection Act. This law was passed in hopes of thwarting illegal and misleading acts by financial reporters and putting a stop to the decline of public trust in accounting and reporting practices. Two important topics covered in Sarbanes-Oxley are auditor independence and the reporting and assessment of internal controls under section 404....   [tags: Accounting Corporation Regulation]

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Effectiveness of Regulatory Reforms as Deterrent to Frauds and Unethical Actions

- Introduction After a decade since implementation of Sarbanes-Oxley Act, people begin to discuss its effectiveness as deterrent to unethical and fraudulent activities. This paper analyses the effectiveness of regulatory reforms, and whether it is better using regulation and legal reforms or through ethnical teaching to prevent recurrence of fraudulent cases. Analysis on Effectiveness of Regulatory Reforms as Deterrent to Frauds and Unethical Actions in Audit What is Fraud Auditing. Fraud auditing is an intentional misinterpretation to obtain benefit....   [tags: Sarbanes-Oxley Act]

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Corporate Responsibility & Ethical Business Conduct

- In 2002, former Enron CEO, Jeffery Skilling, received a twenty-four year prison sentence and ordered to pay $45 million in restitution. When questioned after the sentencing, he was quoted as say, “Of course I feel bad – I feel horrible, but that’s not to say I feel I did anything illegal” (PBS New Hour, 2008, video supplement). This profound mindset, sadly, was indicative of the mentality of many corporate officers at that time. In 2002, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act was passed. Its origin was triggered by a serious of high profile corporate scandals, none of which was more damaging than the exposed corrupt behavior, displayed by those in positions of power and leadership, at Enron Corporation....   [tags: Corruption, Sarbanes-Oxley Act ]

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Ethics Of The Sarbanes Oxley ( Sox ) Act Of 2002

- In the recent years, many businesses have taken a closer look at how the business ethics can either hinder the business or assist them in the growth or sustainability of the business. Examining the different variables of how ethics places into the business’s social responsibilities, and their sustainably organizational strategy and business model. Along with this, both internal and external stakeholders have a part in the influence of the business’s strategy. Although there are many influences to how ethical the business is, many businesses have become more ethically sound after the introduction of the Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX) Act of 2002, which deals with the accounting side of the business (Ba...   [tags: Ethics, Business ethics, Management, Business]

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The Sarbanes-Oxley Act and Corporate Coruption

- Most of us think about the Coca-Cola Company in a positive light because it continues to bring us what is arguably the tastiest soft drink around. One would expect that a company that describes itself on its website as “a company that exists to benefit and refresh everyone it touches” and has been so successful for years would have a corporate culture and code of ethics that matches this image. However, a closer look at the Coca-Cola Company, its corporate culture and allegations of corruption paint a less than rosy picture of the soft drink leader....   [tags: essays research papers fc]

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Sarbanes-Oxley Act Of 2002 Enacted

- Overview The Sarbanes-Oxley Act significantly expands existing federal whistleblower protection laws, and public companies would be well advised to pay special attention to these new protections for corporate whistleblowers. Section 806 of the Act prohibits an employer from engaging in retaliation or discrimination against employees who report suspected accounting or financial fraud, and establishes a new system by which aggrieved employees can bring an action for damages against their employer before the Department of Labor or in federal District Court....   [tags: Business Accounting]

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Effects Of Sarbanes-Oxley Act SOX

- ABSTRACT This paper provides an in-depth evaluation of Sarbanes-Oxley Act, which is said to be promoted to produce change in the corporate environment, in general, by stressing issues of public accountability and disclosure in the financial operations of business. It explains how this is an Act that represents the government's and the Security and Exchange Commission's concern in promoting ethical standards in terms of financial disclosure in the corporate environment. This paper addresses the current criticism of the exportation of U.S....   [tags: Business Regulation Accounting]

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The Sarbanes Oxley Act Helped Change Business Ethics And Culture

- Our group believes that there are several factors that contribute to poor ethical analysis, decisions, and self-destructive behavior. On an organizational and industry level, some of those factors include loose ethical standards being put into place, inadequate enforcement on the part of managers and executives, having too much opportunity to act unethically, and pressure to make profit. On a societal level, the biggest factor is the constant push to be successful, which can lead to people acting unethically to achieve that success....   [tags: Business ethics, Ethics, Enron]

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Mark Twain 's Moral Inferiority

- “The fact that man knows right from wrong proves his intellectual superiority to other creatures; but the fact that he can do wrong proves his moral inferiority to any creatures that cannot.” Mark Twain It was theorized by Carl Jung that people connect ideas, feelings, experiences and information by way of association. Word association is the connection and production of other words in response to a given word. The most common association might be if the word “dog” is initially given there will be a subconscious association with the word “cat” by the majority of individuals....   [tags: Enron, Auditing, Sarbanes–Oxley Act]

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HR Experiential Problem Solving

- What legislative act prompted many U.S. companies to develop internal ethical policies and procedures. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act created new standards for the accountability of businesses and corporations and it includes penalties for acts of misconduct. The Act stipulates new financial reporting obligations, including the adherence to internal controls and procedures which are to certify the validity of their financial records. These accounting controls put into place were meant to reduce unethical/ illegal actions within an organization (Mathis & Jackson, 2011, p....   [tags: business accountability, sarbanes-oxley act]

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Accounting Fraud, the Investor and the Sarbanes Oxley Act

- Accounting Fraud, the Investor and the Sarbanes Oxley Act Throughout the past several years major corporate scandals have rocked the economy and hurt investor confidence. The largest bankruptcies in history have resulted from greedy executives that “cook the books” to gain the numbers they want. These scandals typically involve complex methods for misusing or misdirecting funds, overstating revenues, understating expenses, overstating the value of assets or underreporting of liabilities, sometimes with the cooperation of officials in other corporations (Medura 1-3)....   [tags: Business Finance]

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Private Companies Struggle With The Sarbanes-Oxley Act

- Samuel Smiles, an 18th century Scottish, writer once said, "It is possible that the scrupulously honest man may not grow rich so fast as the unscrupulous and dishonest one; but, the success will be of a truer kind, earned without fraud or injustice. And even though a man should for a time be unsuccessful, still he must be honest: better lose all and save character. For character is itself a fortune…" (Zaadz, 2005). Major corporate scandals such as Enron and WorldCom shook the business world at the turn of the century in a powerful way....   [tags: Business Ethics Morals ]

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How The Sarbanes-Oxley Act Will Impact The Audit Function

- Before the Enron-Arthur Anderson scandal, auditors were generally viewed as independent and trustworthy professionals. They protected the interests of the individual investor by ensuring that corporations presented financial statements that accurately reflected the financial results of operations. The auditor was trusted to present the facts as he saw it, regardless of the implications. When events such as the academy awards used the services of a CPA, it was done not because the counting of ballots was a technically difficult task, but because people believed CPA's could be trusted....   [tags: Business Accounting]

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Enron: Ethical Mess

- Overview Enron’s bankruptcy was one of the largest bankruptcy cases that the United States has ever seen. This paper will include a brief history on the Enron case and talk about some of the ethical issues that caused Enron to go bankrupt. It will also include information on the companies that were an integral part of Enron’s demise and the Sarbanes-Oxley Act that was formed due to Enron’s unethical practices. Definitions Bankruptcy - the state of being completely lacking in a particular quality or value....   [tags: Bankruptcy Cases, Sarbanes Oxley Act]

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A Corporate Code of Ethics is Not Enough

- After news of the scandal of Enron, one of the hottest items on e-Bay was a 64-page copy of Enron’s corporate code of ethics. One seller/former employee proclaimed it had “never been opened.” In the forward Kenneth L. Lay, CEO of Enron stated, “We want to be proud of Enron and to know that it enjoys a reputation for fairness and honesty and that it is respected (Enron 2).” For a company with such an extensive code of ethics and a CEO who seemed to want the company to be respected for that, there are still so many unanswered questions of what exactly went wrong....   [tags: Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 H.R. 3763-45]

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Audit Committees Post Sarbanes - Oxley

- Audit Committees Post Sarbanes - Oxley The importance of audit committees increased through the years and especially from pre-Sarbanes – Oxley to post-Sarbanes – Oxley. Although, what are the responsibilities of the audit committee members. How does a Chief Audit Executive (CAE) more effectively serve their audit committee members. How do auditors communicate with audit committees. What are the requirements for audit committees. Most of these questions are inherited from what the audit committee’s best practices are....   [tags: Business Management ]

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Dodd-Frank and Sarbanes-Oxley Acts

- Dodd-Frank and Sarbanes-Oxley Acts: Dodd-Frank and Sarbanes-Oxley Acts are important legislations in the corporate world because of their link to public and privately held companies. Sarbanes-Oxley Act was enacted to enhance transparency and accountability in publicly traded companies. On the contrary, Dodd-Frank Act was enacted to disentangle the confused web of financial service company valuations. Actually, these valuations are usually hidden by complex and unclear financial instruments. The introduction of Sarbanes-Oxley Act was fueled by recent incidents of accounting frauds by top executives of major corporations such as Enron....   [tags: private and public companies]

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Lack Of Auditor Independence And The Sarbanes Oxley ( Sox )

- Lack of Auditor Independence Background In response to the famous Enron accounting scandal, which resulted in dissolution of the company and its auditing firm Arthur Anderson, for overstated income by intentionally understating liabilities and concealing debt through special purpose entities, while Arthur Anderson was found guilty for destroying evidence that tied the firm to its audit of Enron, the SEC (2002) designed a rules to ensure that auditors are independent of their audit client and the Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX) Act of 2002 mandates that audit committees be responsible for the oversight of the engagement of the company’s independent auditor....   [tags: Auditing, Audit, Auditor's report]

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The Sarbanese-Oxley Act and Its Importance in Business

- Introduction If corporate America learned anything in 2001, it was that looks can be deceiving- and also financial statements. In early 2001, Enron was highly regarded as one of the most competitive energy companies in its sector. By December of 2001, Enron collapsed; filing for bankruptcy and eventually losing it’s investors over sixty-three billion dollars, and not to mention the loss of thousands of employee pensions and/or 401 K. This gigantic fallout of Enron was a result of a series of fraudulent transactions stemming to falsifying financial documentation....   [tags: Ethics, Fraud]

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Sarbanes Oxley SOX - Effective Governance

- Sarbanes-Oxley: Effective Governance. Introduction On December 2, 2001, less than a month after it admitted accounting errors that inflated earnings by almost $600 million since 1994, the Houston-based energy trading company, Enron Corporation, filed for bankruptcy protection. With $62.8 billion in assets, it became the largest bankruptcy case in U.S. history, dwarfing Texaco's filing in 1987 when it had $35.9 billion in assets. The day Enron filed for bankruptcy its stock closed at 72 cents, down from more than $75 less than a year earlier....   [tags: Accounting Regulation]

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The Sarbanes-Oxley

- INTRODUCTION In the wake of high-profile corporate accounting debacles, authorities have started to take action, and new international accounting standards (IAS) defined rules on boards¡¦ responsibilities and imposed penalties (the Sarbanes-Oxley Act) have come into effect. IAS rules will cause a greater need for comparability across various accounting and reporting principles. The European Union has decided that listed companies, a company which has any of its shares listed on a recognized stock market, should use international accounting standards (IAS) for accounting periods beginning since January 2005....   [tags: Account Standards Accuracy Reports Financial State]

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The Sabarnes-Oxley Act and PCAOB

- ... Furthermore, deficiencies included failures by the firm to perform, or to perform sufficiently, certain necessary audit procedures. ISSUES/FAILINGS FOUND BY PCAOB: The inspection procedure carried out by PCAOB included reviews of several audits conducted by the firm. The issues or failing being found are as follows, In this audit, the Firm failed in the following respects to obtain sufficient competent corroborating evidence to support its audit opinion - The firm did not identify a material weakness in internal control of the issuer....   [tags: public accounting firms, inspection]

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Sarbanes-Oxley Section 404 and Affect on Small Business

- Analysis of Sarbanes-Oxley – Section 404 And Affect on Small Companies Content I. Executive Summary 1 II. Background Facts 2 III. Issue Stated 3 IV. Analysis 4-5 V. Conclusion 6 VI. References 7 Executive Summary 404 of Sarbanes Oxley: It’s affect on small business....   [tags: Accounting Regulation]

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Is The Uniform Partnership Act?

- Rising to the surface in today’s economic world, corporations are devising new strategies for partnering and taking over companies that will fit well inside the brand that these corporations are branding for themselves. We have seen in the past what investors and strategists alike will do and are willing to do to advance their portfolios and careers at the expense of the investor. There has been more corporate corruption in the past decade than there has been in the past. It’s not a new thing to cheat and rob, but it has become easier and harder to track with advance modern technology and a virtually paperless trail to follow....   [tags: Budget, Budgets, United Kingdom budget, Management]

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Public Accounting Reform And Investor Protection Act

- Capitalism is almost too good to be true, but there comes a time when government intervention becomes a necessity, especially after a series of scandals in corporate businesses that destroyed the trust of investors and consumers. The government finally had to come up with a solution due to the fact that the free market is no longer efficient on its own. Established in 2002, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, also known as Public Accounting Reform and Investor Protection Act, is a federal law that aims to improve corporate governance by increasing compliance regulations and financial transparency in hopes of preventing big scale corruptions such as the Enron Scandal from happening again....   [tags: Enron, Business ethics, Capitalism]

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The Sarbane-Oxley Act (SOA)

- INTRODUCTION "The Public Company Accounting Reform and Investor Protection Act" was signed into law by President Bush on July 30, 2002. The law is now known as The Sarbane-Oxley Act (SOA). The SOA has eleven titles within the act and numerous sections, pertaining to ethics, accounting, financial reporting, responsibilities of officers, whistleblower protection, and increased criminal penalties built upon prior securities laws. SOA is the most comprehensive securities legislation written since the 1940s....   [tags: Corporate Governance ]

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An Audit Of An Auditor

- Any company needs to make sure that all the information on the report is true and also accurate, and that it displays the company’s financial situation. So in order to do this, they need someone who has no connection with company’s interest. This is where an auditor comes in to play. The process of making sure that the company’s financial reports are correct is called auditing. An audit is usually done once a year (Epstein, 2014). An auditor will get all the information together that will support any and all evidence and tests and works with them till they get an accurate statement....   [tags: Internal control, Auditing, Audit, Enron]

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Enron Scandals Involving Unethical Corporate Governance Practices

- Between the years 2000 and 2002 there were over a dozen corporate scandals involving unethical corporate governance practices. The allegations ranged from faulty revenue reporting and falsifying financial records, to the shredding and destruction of financial documents (Patsuris, 2002). Most notably, are the cases involving Enron and Arthur Andersen. The allegations of the Enron scandal went public in October 2001. They included, hiding debt and boosting profits to the tune of more than one billion dollars....   [tags: Business ethics, Enron, Ethics]

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Convincing Americans to Invest

- When considering whether or not to invest money, many Americans have become hesitant. Shock waves of the Enron, Tyco, and WorldCom scandals can still be felt more than ten years later. As Americans witnessed the loss of thousands of dollars by Enron investors and employees, they became timid about investing their life savings not knowing if they too would receive nothing in return. With the knowledge of how a decline in Financial Marketing would greatly affect the U. S. economy, Congress eagerly began pursuing ways to reinforce America’s faith in investing their hard earned money....   [tags: Enron, Auditing Firms, Accountability]

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