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Reproduction of the Oikos in Aeschylus’ Oresteia

- Aeschylus’ Oresteia is the chronicles of a cursed family that includes a circle of betrayal, adultery, and murder, among other things. The Greek word oikos can be used to describe the Greek family structure. In Homer’s Odyssey, two polar opposites of oikoi are given. First, the son of Odysseus’ son Telemachus meets Nestor, who symbolizes a near-perfect oikos . The family is involved in a large sacrificial feast upon the arrival of Telemachus . He also utilizes xenia, the Greek word for manners or the ideal guest-host relationship, to perfection....   [tags: Aeschylus Oresteia ]

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Violence and Monarchy in The Literary Works of Oresteia

- Violence and Monarchy in The Literary Works of Oresteia In the ancient myths from the Aegean seas, much political theory is derived. Lessons on the dangers associated with monarchical political forms are brought to light. The connection between gender and power along with violence, war and necessity raise questions to enact a democracy and depersonalize the government. In the literary works of the Oresteia there is a relationship built between the perpetuated cycle of violence and monarchy. The cycle of vengeance began with the slaughter of Thyestes children and continued throughout the generations of hierarchy....   [tags: Greek Mythology, Oresteia]

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The Oresteia, Aeschylus

- In “The Oresteia” trilogy, the ancient Greek playwright Aeschylus advocates the importance of the male role in society over that of the female. The entire trilogy can be seen as a subtle proclamation of the superiority of men over women. Yet, the women create the real interest in the plays. Their characters are the impetus that makes everything occur. The most complex and compelling character in the three plays is Clytaemnestra. Clytaemnestra is consumed with thoughts of revenge. She seeks vengeance on Agamemnon for the loss of their daughter, Iphigeneia whose life was forfeited in order to appease the goddess Artemis so that Agamemnon's troops would be allowed passage to the Trojan shore....   [tags: The Oresteia Trilogy]

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The Conflict in The Eumenides of The Oresteia

- The Conflict in The Eumenides of The Oresteia   In The Eumenides, the third book of The Oresteia, there exists a strong rivalry between the Furies and the god Apollo; from the moment of their first confrontation in Apollo’s temple at Delphi, it is clear that the god and the spirits are opposing forces. Their actions bring them into direct conflict, and both of them are stubbornly set on achieving their respective goals while at the same time interfering with or preventing the actions of the other....   [tags: Aeschylus Oresteia]

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The Power of Zeus Teleios in the Oresteia

- The Power of Zeus Teleios in the Oresteia         Is the action in the Oresteia preordained. Is the trilogy simply a working through of destiny and fate; the ultimate telos of the events being the downfall of the house of Atreus. Are the characters in the story destroyed by themselves or by the necessity of the deeds that are carried out. These are some of the questions I will discuss in this essay.   I wish to concentrate on the end of the story as we know it, the Eumenides, with reference to character portrayal in the previous parts of the trilogy....   [tags: Aeschylus Oresteia]

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The Imagery of Bloodshed in The Oresteia

- The Imagery of Bloodshed in The Oresteia   In the prologue of Agamemnon, the first play of Aeschylus' trilogy, The Oresteia, the watchman implores the gods for "a blessed end to all our pain." (20). He is asking for deliverance from the retributive system of justice, where the only certainty is that bloodshed breeds more bloodshed. The old men of the chorus in their opening chant, "Hymn to Zeus," declare that suffering must be experienced before man can be released from this ceaseless irredeemable bloodshed and thus be, "free from all the pain." (1) They declare that it is a law laid down by Zeus "that we must suffer, suffer into truth./ We cannot sleep, and drop by drop a...   [tags: Aeschylus Oresteia]

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The Oresteia - The War-of the-Sexes in Eumenides

- The War-of the-Sexes in Eumenides   In this essay I will examine the war-of the-sexes taking place in The Eumenides, the final play of The Oresteia. The plot of The Eumenides pits Orestes and Apollo (representing the male gods and, to a certain extent, male values in general) against the ghost of Clytemnestra and the Furies (equally representative of female values.) Of more vital importance, however, is whether Athene sides with the males or females throughout the play. The character of Orestes is somewhat down-played in The Eumenides and in fact his role is far less significant than that of Apollo....   [tags: Oresteia Essays]

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Justice and Social Order in The Oresteia

- Justice and Social Order in The Oresteia   Democracy, emerging in the city-state of Athens, allowed unprecedented power to her citizens. Among these new powers was the ability to legislate. Yet, legislation was not without its problems. First the citizens must agree upon what is just and unjust, and then enforce the law by bringing the unjust to reconcile their guilt with the public through trial, and finally dispense the appropriate penalty. This evolution was not without concern. The Greeks were attempting to establish a governmental system which would span the middle ground between anarchy and despotism....   [tags: Aeschylus Oresteia]

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The Judgment of Athena in Oresteia

- The Judgment of Athena in Oresteia Athena resolves the conflicts of the Oresteia with an ambiguous judgment that seems to satisfy all parties involved. However, in any conflict, at least one party must make sacrifices to work toward a resolution. Athena achieves her paradoxical result by misleading Apollo to think that he has received total victory in judgment and by offering compensatory powers to the Erinyes, thus creating an illusion of satisfaction for all amidst a reality of compromise. Athena first addresses Apollo's argument of the superiority of paternity, but she allows compromise by never fully admitting that Clytemnestra's murder was morally justified....   [tags: Aeschylus Oresteia]

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The Powerful Clytemnestra in Aeschylus' Oresteia

- The Powerful Clytemnestra in Aeschylus' Oresteia What Price Glory. was the title of a Maxwell Anderson play about World War I. Although the Oresteia deals with the period following a much different war, the same question can be asked of it. In the trilogy Aeschylus presents the reader with a stunning example of ancient Greek society, in which warrior ideals were firmly held, and glory in battle was considered the supreme good. The question of moral justification in the trilogy brings in many complex issues, but all of them revolve around the construction of Greek society and the role of different individuals in this system....   [tags: Aeschylus Oresteia]

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The Oresteia by Aeschylus: Guilty or Innocent

- When a person is accused of a crime they are either found innocent or guilty. This is the basic idea of justice and it is what many feel needs to happen if someone has done something controversial. In the play The Oresteia by Aeschylus, the story of Clytemnestra guilt or innocents is questioned. She does many things that people are not too happy with and those controversial actions throughout the story, mainly in the first part Agamemnon get her into the trouble. As we explore the case that builds against her innocents by exploring the killings of Agamemnon and Cassandra and the boastful expression about the killings....   [tags: Oresteia Aeschylus]

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Justice in Aeschylus' The Oresteia

- Justice in Aeschylus' The Oresteia How can an endless and violently destructive cycle be just. The concept appears in places along the human timeline as diverse as the Bible and West Side Story. Why do people have a tendency to amplify and repeat violence through a cycle of murder and revenge, and how can this destructive process be called justice. In The Oresteia, the cycle is a familiar one, but is also interweaved with gender issues and a sense of justice that changes within the cycle itself....   [tags: Aeschylus Oresteia]

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Justice and Aeschylus' Oresteia

- Justice and Aeschylus' Oresteia        At first glance, the picture of justice found in the Oresteia appears very different from that found in Heraclitus. And indeed, at the surface level there are a number of things which are distinctly un-Heraclitean. However, I believe that a close reading reveals more similarities than differences; and that there is a deep undercurrent of the Heraclitean world view running throughout the trilogy. In order to demonstrate this, I will first describe those ways in which the views of justice in Aeschylus' Oresteia and in Heraclitus appear dissimilar....   [tags: Oresteia Essays]

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The Cycle of Vengeance in Aeschylus’s Oresteia

- The Cycle of Vengeance in Aeschylus’s Oresteia   The cyclic thread of vengeance runs like wild fire through the three plays in Aeschylus’s Oresteia. This thread, with its complexity of contemporary and universal implications lends itself quite well to – in fact, almost necessitates – deeply interested study. While a brief summary of the Oresteia will inevitably disregard some if not much of the trilogy’s essence and intent, on the positive side it will establish a platform of characters, events, and motives with which this paper is primarily concerned....   [tags: Oresteia Essays]

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Eumenides - Resolution of Conflict in Aeschylus' Oresteia

- The Resolution of Conflict in Aeschylus' Oresteia       Aeschylus, was a master dramatist - he liked to portray conflict between persons, human or divine, or between principles.1 His trilogy of plays, the Oresteia, develops many conflicts that must be resolved during the action of the Eumenides, the concluding play of the trilogy. The central theme of the Oresteia is justice (dike) and in dealing with questions of justice, Aeschylus at every stage involves the gods.2 The Oresteia's climactic conflict in the Eumenides revolves around justice and the gods - opposing conceptions of justice and conflicting classes of gods....   [tags: Aeschylus Oresteia]

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Progression from Evil to Good in Oresteia

- Progression from Evil to Good in Oresteia Aeschylus' use of darkness and light as a consistent image in the Oresteia depicts a progression from evil to good, disorder to order. In the Oresteia, there exists a situation among mortals that has gotten out of control; a cycle of death has arisen in the house of Atreus. There also exists a divine disorder within the story which, as the situation of the mortals, must be brought to resolution: the Furies, an older generation of gods, are in conflict with the younger Olympian gods because they have been refused their ancient right to avenge murders between members of the same family....   [tags: Aeschylus Oresteia]

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Eumenides - Importance of Gender in Aeschylus' Oresteia

- The Importance of Gender in Aeschylus' Oresteia          Gender is made explicit as a theme throughout the Oresteia through a series of male-female conflicts and incorrectly gendered characters dominated by the figure of Clytemnestra, a woman out of place. This opposition of gender then engenders all the other oppositions of the trilogy; conflicts of oikos and polis, chthonic and Olympian, old and young can be assigned to female and male spheres respectively.  In this essay I will look at how the polis examines itself in terms of gender by focusing on the Eumenides' exploration of the myth of matriarchy, issues of the conflict between oikos and polis and the use of speech within the polis....   [tags: Aeschylus Oresteia]

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Oresteia - The Issue of Justice in Aeschylus' Eumenides

- Oresteia - The Issue of Justice in Aeschylus' Eumenides The concept of justice is manifested through the three plays of Aeschylus' Oresteia. The old tradition of justice, the private blood feud, caused an ungoverned succession of violent acts that spiralled uncontrollably. Aegisthus, Clytemnestra's lover, is introduced in Agamemnon; he desires vengeance for the plot contrived by Agamemnon's father (Ag: 1605-1611).1 Neither Agamemnon nor Aegisthus took part in this "plot" and yet as the chorus explains (Ag: 755-6) 'But ancient Violence longs to breed, new violence comes when its fatal hour comes,' The justice system of this period demanded that one avenge the death of a family me...   [tags: Aeschylus Oresteia]

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The Role of Dreams in Genesis, Song of Songs, and The Oresteia

- The Role of Dreams in Genesis, Song of Songs, and The Oresteia When describing the role of dreams in ancient texts, Freud wrote, “They took it for granted that dreams were related to the world of the supernatural beings in whom they believed, and that they brought inspirations from the gods and demons.  Moreover, it appeared to them that dreams must serve a special purpose in respect of the dreamer; that, as a rule, they predicted the future.”   He goes on to explain the findings of a fellow psychiatrist, Gruppe, who believed that there are two classes of dreams in ancient texts.  The first class is influenced only by the present or past and does not play a largely significant role in the...   [tags: Aeschylus Oresteia]

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Comparing Women's Revenge in The Oresteia and Medea

- Comparing Women's Revenge in The Oresteia and Medea Clytaemnestra and Medea are two women who are seeking justice for a wrong committed by their husbands. Clytaemnestra?s husband, Agamemnon, did not wrong here directly but rather indirectly. Agamemnon sacrificed their daughter Iphigeneia, in order to calm the Thracian winds. For Clytaemnestra this brought much hatred towards Agamemnon. Here Agamemnon had betrayed Clytaemnestra and their daughters trust, and for that she sought revenge. Medea's husband, Jason, had dishonored her with his unfaithfulness....   [tags: Oresteia Medea Revenge Essays]

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The Philosophy and Psychology of Sophocles’s Antigone and The Eumenides in Aeschylus’ Oresteia

- The Philosophy and Psychology of Sophocles’s Antigone and The Eumenides in Aeschylus’ Oresteia There is a consensus among readers of the poetry or plays written in the fifth century that the plays succeed with inspiring profound movement on the audience. The methods or reasons for the reader to be moved by a text are often disputed. Specific to tragic works the concepts of philosophy and psychology are critical elements to understand the cause of the stirred emotions of individuals who response to classical tragedies in a similar manner....   [tags: Antigone Oresteia]

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The Oresteia

- The Oresteia In the trilogy Oresteia, the issues concerned are the transformation from vengeance to law, from chaos to peace, from dependence to independence, and from old to new. These four significant changes all take place throughout the play and are somewhat parallel to the transformations that were going on in Ancient Greece. In Aeschylus' trilogy, the Greeks' justice system went through a transformation from old to new ways. In the beginning of the trilogy, the characters settle their matters, both personal and professional, with vengeance....   [tags: Papers]

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Justice in the Oresteia

- Justice in the Oresteia Justice is often taken for granted in the world we live in today with a judicial system that gives fair punishment for most crimes. In the Oresteia justice works much differently, where there are no judges or a court system to resolve disputes, instead there is revenge. Revenge is very messy because somebody will and has to get hurt first to desire revenge, and it leads to a cycle that cannot and will not end until everybody is dead. Justice does not and cannot only be revenge because in the end nobody would be left in that system....   [tags: Papers]

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Suffering in the Oresteia

- In the Greek play, the Oresteia, suffering acts as a vital role in the lives of the main characters. One character, the chorus, discusses suffering at great length. The chorus is made up of old men who were too old to fight against Troy, and who often give the audience an inside view to the actions happening on stage. The chorus sites hubris, the Greek word referring to mortal pride or arrogance, as being the cause of many bad fates. Someone guilty of hubris aspires to be more and do more than what the gods allow, resulting in severe punishment and a tragic destiny....   [tags: Performance Arts]

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Vengeance in Oresteia

- Vengeance in Oresteia From the beginning of time vengeance or retribution has been part of the human condition. This is especially true in Aeschylus's trilogy the Oresteia. One of the underlying themes in these works is Oculo pro oculo or an eye for an eye. According to the plays introduction by Richmond Lattimore, the history behind this blood feud of vengeance begins with Atreus and Thyestes. Atreus tricks his brother Thyestes into partaking of his own children (another possible Hannibal sequel)....   [tags: Papers]

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The Characterisation of Clytaemnestra in the "Oresteia"

- In this essay I intend to discuss how Aeschylus presents Clytaemnestra in the Oresteia and how he marks the extent to which traits of Clytaemnestra's character remain defiantly unchanged as she manipulates events and characters around her. Clytaemnestra is the only character who appears in all three plays in the trilogy, but despite her immense stage presence she remains a troublesome character to interpret due to the highly ambiguous nature of her words. I intend to show that the key to unlocking Clytaemnestra's manly heart lies in the fact that she hated Agamemnon, not simply because he had killed her child, nor because she loved Aegisthus, but out of a jealousy that was not a jealously of...   [tags: European Literature]

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Sleep Imagery in The Oresteia

- Sleep Imagery in The Oresteia Sleep—it's what divides the day and the night; the conscious and the subconscious; the aware and the unaware. It's image, then, is a powerful tool for polarizing such extremes. In his trilogy, The Oresteia, Aeschylus utilizes sleep imagery to divide between those who are aware and those who aren't. Though sleep's meaning changes throughout the plays, Clytaemestra is always able to use it to her aid. Her story accompanies a shift in a justice system that defines right and wrong....   [tags: Papers]

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Comparing Oresteia and The Republic

- Comparing Oresteia and The Republic The tragic poet Aeschylus, and the philosopher Plato have arguably written two of the most influencing works ever in western history. The Oresteia, and The Republic each respectively depicts its individual accounts of how justice came to exist in human society. In the ancient In the famous dialogs of Socrates, The Republic attempts to analyze society rationally and change the state so that individuals could attain the Socratic goal of moral excellence. For Socrates, the just state could not be founded on tradition because tradition was not based on rational thinking, nor on the doctrine of power and strength being right....   [tags: Papers]

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Oresteia: Revenge

- In the Oresteia there seems to be a continuing cycle of revenge. Someone is murdered and then a relative must kill the murderer, therefore becoming a murderer himself. A new chosen one is then selected to take revenge on that person who killed before him and the cycle goes on and on. The furies also play a part in this cycle of revenge. They seek out those who kill their blood relatives and haunt them and torture them for eternity. So basically they also take revenge for the ones that have been murdered....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Comparing Ethics of Responsibility in The Visit and The Oresteia

- The Visit and The Oresteia: Ethics of Responsibility       When Friedrich Durrenmatt wrote the play The Visit, he was doing so in response to what he saw as appalling neutrality on the part of the Swiss during World War II, neutrality that we now know was something more insidious.  This powerful play expresses what happens in a community where responsibility is abdicated and scapegoating is employed, what happens when mercy falls to vengeance in the name of justice.  It is a play designed to shock society into recognizing its own flaws and choosing a different course of action, a different way to be.  Today I would like to briefly describe how this play and its connections help...   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]

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1898 words | (5.4 pages) | Preview

Comedic Violence in The Medea, The Oresteia, and Antigone

- Comedic Violence in The Medea, The Oresteia, and Antigone       Almost no Greek tragedy escapes the use of violence. The Medea, The Oresteia, Antigone, and other classic works of Grecian tragoidia all involve huge components of violence in many prominent places, and for all of these stories, violent action is an integral part of the play. Medea, especially, is a character worthy of note in this regard; her tumultuous life can be plotted accurately along a path of aggression and passionate fits, and her bloody history lends tension and ascendance to the cathartic events of the gripping Medea....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]

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The Strong Women in The Orestia by Aeschylus

- The Strong Women in The Orestia by Aeschylus To most readers, the women of The Orestia are evil and vindictive, a disgrace to all chaste and righteous women.  Aeschylus portrayed women as equals to men, which was not the opinion of most Greeks at the time.  Although he showed some of his women characters as evil, he granted them power, and emasculated the men around them.  Unlike Homer, the women of Aeschylus show both ranges of emotions, both the good and the bad.  A woman portrayed as a villain may be thought of negatively, but the fact that a female is allowed to be the villain, to take action, and leave other men helpless to the choices that she makes, it is a great step.  In the time...   [tags: Aeschylus Oresteia Essays]

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Comparing The Oresteia And The 3 Dialogues By Plato Euthyrpo, Apology And Crito

- ... This is due to the fact that humans are mortal beings canpable of sin and therefore are not ones to properly judge purely by themselves what is just and how they should go about enacting justice. In Mycenae the furies are in charge of going after people who have committed blood crimes like murder and seeking vengeance. However this form of jsuice produce by the furies or the moral is not befneficial for the society. The qote an eye for an eye makes the whole world blind is a very adapt phrase for the situation in this play....   [tags: Plato, Socrates, Crito, KILL]

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Justice And Morality Of The Justice System Of Sophocles ' Oresteia And Plato 's Republic And Apology

- Justice is generally thought to be part of one system; equally affecting all involved. We define justice as being fair or reasonable. The complications fall into the mix when an act of heroism occurs or morals are written or when fear becomes to great a force. These complications lead to the division of justice onto levels. In Aeschylus’ Oresteia and Plato’s Republic and Apology, both Plato and Aeschylus examine the views of justice and the morality of the justice system on two levels: in the city-state and the individual....   [tags: Agamemnon, Greek mythology, Plato, Trojan War]

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A Comparison of Civilization in The Oresteia and Milton's Paradise Lost

- Civilization in The Oresteia and Paradise Lost         The continual search for a perfect civilization marks the history of human progress. From Plato to Locke to Marx, man has sought to order society to provide justice for himself and his children. In this quest for paradise, myths of primitivity help describe how social institutions can direct humans away from their temptations toward higher goals. In Aeschylus' The Oresteia and John Milton's Paradise Lost, human civilization is viewed as an imperfect balance of opposites which helps combat man's tendencies toward barbarism and misogyny....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]

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Comparing Revenge in Aeschylus' The Oresteia Trilogy and Sophocles' Electra

- Revenge in Aeschylus' The Oresteia Trilogy and Sophocles' Electra   The act of revenge in classical Greek plays and society is a complex issue with unavoidable consequences. In certain instances, it is a more paramount concern than familial ties. When a family member is murdered another family member is expected to seek out and administer revenge. If all parties involved are of the same blood, the revenge is eventually going to wipe out the family. Both Aeschylus, through "The Oresteia Trilogy," and Sophocles, through "Electra," attempt to show the Athenians that revenge is a just act that at times must have no limits on its reach....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]

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The Dilemmas of the Oresteia: Like Father, Like Son?

- Aeschylus' The Oresteia features two characters burdened by seemingly hopeless decisions. First is Agamemnon, king of Argos, whose army was thwarted by the goddess, Artemis. Agamemnon was faced with the decision to call off the army's sail to Troy, and thus admit defeat and embarrassment, or to sacrifice his daughter, Iphigenia, to satisfy Artemis whom had stopped the winds to delay Agamemnon's fleet. Second is Orestes, son of Agamemnon, who was given the choice by Apollo to avenge his father's murder, thus committing matricide, or face a series of torturous consequences....   [tags: World Literature]

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Emasculation of Men Leads to Deaths of Women

- Women, like men, are accountable for all of their deeds. However, in Greek literature, in which male-dominated societies are common, women who take personal responsibility for their actions often face unfair consequences. For example, in Aeschylus's The Oresteia and Sophocles' Antigone, Clytaemnestra and Antigone both took justice into their own hands to honor their respective families. As a result, they died at the hands of men who had difficulty accepting their justifications. The reason for this is because the men felt emasculated by these two women's actions....   [tags: antigone, oresteia, agamemnon]

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Religious Beliefs in Aeschylus' Oresteia, Homer’s Iliad, and Sophocles’ Electra

- Religious Beliefs in Aeschylus' Oresteia, Homer’s Iliad, and Sophocles’ Electra The final and definitive defeat of the Persian army at the battle of Plataea represented the end of an age-long threat to Athens. But the victory was also a miracle, as all the odds were against the Athenians at the onset of the war. While Pericles took charge of Athens after the war and started the advance of democracy, religion also thrived. The rebuilding of the Acropolis and the construction of the Parthenon and its great statue of Athene under Pericles' rule signified the height of religious belief among Athenians....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]

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Justice In Orestes

- Justice in Orestes Aeschylus is primarily concerned with the nature of justice. In the trilogy The Oresteia, the Akhaians evolve from an older, more primitive autocratic form of justice, to a new concept of civil justice devised by Athena. He confronts the contrast between the old and new orders, the lives of the members of the House of Atreus, and the serious moral questions that Orestes' crime presents. The case against Orestes is strong. The son admits to striking down his mother, in violation of the sacred tenant of kinship....   [tags: The Oresteia Equality Justice Essays]

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The Orestia:Aeschylus, Religion and Women

- Aeschylus was, by all accounts, a notable participant in Athens’s major dramatic competitions. Regarded as the father of tragedy, Aeschylus used poetry to address ethical dilemmas that were often present during his time. In the Oresteia, Aeschylus’ religious tendencies seem to, at times, cloud his view. In the context of the play, events created by human hubris set off a chain reaction of such epic proportions that only the gods can help mend; he seems to forgive and forget the gods involvement in the events that lead to the curse....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]

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Tragedy in The Orestia

- Tragedy in the Oresteia The human will desires transcendence. Instead of recognizing the physical and mental limits of our species, we labor to circumvent them. The desire for immanent achievement, transcendence and supremacy becomes especially apparent whenever man attempts to intervene against nature: in medicine, we attempt to secure immortality through antibiotics and surgery; in contemporary moral culture, we attempt to justify and defend sanguineous deeds of the past and present through constant objectification and qualification; and in psychology, we attempt to simultaneously separate and unite the brain and mind through psychoneurological principles....   [tags: Aeschylus]

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Establishing a Singular Standard of Justice

- Ambiguity is a natural part of life. Rarely is there ever a singular, definitive answer for anything. Justice is no exception. There is not one standard of justice: there are many. The standard can depend on history, on culture, on theology, or a variety of other factors. As different groups come together, though, having different standards of justice becomes a problem. The Oresteia, a three-part play by Aeschylus, and Death in Gaza, a film by James Miller, both showcase a struggle between two different standards of justice and the difficulty in reconciling such dissimilar ideals....   [tags: Necessity of Compromise]

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A Modern Heroine

- A Modern Heroine In today’s society, women have overcome many hardships to become able to vote, able to run for public office, and even able to hold high business positions. Some people believe that such accomplishments are because of literary examples that have, over the years, lead women to believe in themselves, motivate them-selves, and stand up for themselves. In Aeschylus’ infamous Greek tragedy, The Oresteia, Clytaemestra, the leading woman, overcomes the Greek society’s slighting attitude towards women, grasping the most powerful position attain-able in Argos....   [tags: essays papers]

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A History of Tragedies

- Where did tragedy originate, and who decided that killing the main characters of a play was best way to communicate his plot. Tragedy was invented by the Greeks long ago. In the fourth year of the sixty-third Olympiad, or 525 B.C., the first great tragic playwright was born (“Aeschylus”). The playwright's name was Aeschylus, son of Euphorion ("Aeschylus"), and he wrote about ninety plays, though the number is uncertain, seven of which have withstood the tests of time (Kopff). His works have been incredible to the point that he earned the title "Father of Tragedy" (Kopff)....   [tags: Aeschylus, death of the main character]

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Greek Dram Greek Tragedy

- ... For example in his play The Oedipus Trilogy, Oedipus seeks the truth about his father murderer to only find out that he is the murderer. Sophocles plays are about the folly of human arrogance and the wisdom of accepting fate. Euripides plays showed the reality of war, and criticized religion. In his plays he would place peasants alongside princes and gave their feelings equal weight. There is a poignant realism in his plays for example in a scene from one of his plays the anti-war Trojan women, a grandmother grieves over the daughter and grandson she has outlived....   [tags: Tragedy, Euripides, Aeschylus, Sophocles]

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Death, Personal Experience and the Supernatural in Sylvia Plath's Poetry

- These five poems by Sylvia Plath are all connected by the theme of death, self-loathing, and by the presence of historical and magical concepts. Sylvia Plath uses very powerfully charged imagery of controversial and emotional topics in order to best describe her own life. Most of the poems reflect her own personal life, including the events that she has experienced and, more appropriately, the relationships and emotions that she has felt. Every single one of these five poems uses the word “dead” and the topic of death itself is prevalent in some manner....   [tags: Poetry Analysis]

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The Serpent and the Eagle: From Darkness to Light

- Yet as we journey from the dark to the light in Aeschylus, we cannot leave the dark behind – the darkness breeds the light. ⎯ Robert Fagles and W. B. Stanford, “Introduction: The Serpent and the Eagle” It is without fail that throughout Aeschylus’ trilogy, The Oresteia, the presence of light and dark can be found in the characters, the plot and the themes. The trilogy follows the House of Atreus its emergence from darkness into the light. However, the light and darkness are often presented symbolically throughout the trilogy and often appear as pairs, which are constantly at odds with each other like Clytaemnestra versus Orestes and Apollo verses the Furies....   [tags: literature, Aeschylus trilogy]

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The Influences of Playwright Eugene O’Neill

- Many playwrights drew from outside influences to compose their works. They would look the era they were living in, their personal lives, childhood experiences, and even ancient texts to acquire inspiration for their works and famous playwright, Eugene O’Neill, is no exception. Writing through two world wars, a great depression, and boom of the motion-picture industry, O’Neill certainly had much inspiration to choose from. Although not becoming nationally recognized until after his father’s death in 1920, O’Neill still managed to produce fifty completed works....   [tags: Drama, Era, Influences]

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The Significance of Animal Symbolism and its Effect on Gender Role

- The Significance of Animal Symbolism and its Effect on Gender Role Throughout many ancient Greek texts, there are aspects of nature playing important roles in the main plot. Sometimes they assist the thesis through a metaphor or simile which better visualizes the author's true meaning. Lions have many different personality traits which make them extremely diverse creatures. This also promotes various applications to characters in literary works. In two works, the Oresteia by Aeschylus and Euripides' Bacchae, we see a continuing line of examples of lion imagery....   [tags: Papers]

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Orestes An Innocent Hero

- Orestes: An Innocent Hero Throughout time there has been a universal question that does not yet yield a universal answer. All people have a different view on whether or not it is right to avenge the killing of another, through the death of the killers. In America during this day and age, it is the obligation of the court system to decide whether or not a murderer should be put to death. Most of the time, the criminal is sentenced to a prison term, but when a judge decides to issue the death penalty there is usually an uproar among the people....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Oedupus Rex and Libation Bearers

- Contemporary Analysis of Ethics, Virtues and Moral Dilemmas in Greek Plays The Greek Plays including ‘Antigone,' ‘Oedipus Rex’ and ‘Libation Bearers’ (Orestia) are generally viewed and praised as works of fine literature, written by renounced playwrights during the 5th century. The plays themselves are ample with hamartia, catharsis, irony and enriched faculties of composition. Notwithstanding its great value in literature, the Greek plays possess a unique, different dimension that is not often brought to light....   [tags: moral, justice, dilemma]

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Chorus Intervention in Aeschylus' the Eumenides and Agamemnon

- In The Eumenides and Agamemnon of The Oresteia trilogy, Aeschylus constructs an over-arching metaphor for elements of the new Athenian democracy. The chorus in each play represents the people who feel under-represented and disrespected, by the society's changing values. In The Eumenides, the chorus of Furies is frustrated with the younger gods and infringements on their power; in Agamemnon the chorus fears more the control of an effective woman in Clytemnestra rather than the leadership of fruitless Agamemnon....   [tags: Comparative Literature]

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Civilization in Aeschylus' The Orchesteia and Voltaire's Candide

- Man’s continual search for a perfect civilization attributes the history of human progress. From Plato to Locke to Marx, man has always sought to order society to provide justice for himself and for his children. In this everlasting quest for perfection and utopia, many writers have suffered the penalties of imprisonment, exile, or even death. In time, most critical writers learned that in order to avoid such brushes with the authorities, they must use imagination, sarcasm and irony, as in satire, and/or use aliases so that their identity remains undisclosed....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Authors' Conceptions of Human Nature

- Authors' Conceptions of Human Nature Philosophers, politicians, and writers throughout all of the western world and across all of our written history have discovered the importance of knowing human nature. Human nature is responsible for our definitions of abstract concepts that are surprisingly universal across the western world like justice, equity, and law. Human nature must also be carefully studied in an effort to understand, obtain, or maintain power within society. Finally, human nature must also be carefully understood so as to protect it from being manipulated and to understand its place in society....   [tags: Human Nature Philosophy Essays]

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Eumenides vs. The Haunted

- Eumenides vs. The Haunted Throughout time there has been a universal question that does not yet yield a universal answer: whether or not it is right to avenge the murder of another by killing the killers. In both “The Haunted,” the third play from Eugene O’ Neill’s trilogy “Morning Becomes Electra,” and “Eumenides,” the third play from Aeschylus’ trilogy “The Oresteia,” the respective sons are directly or indirectly responsible for the deaths of their mothers after their mothers intentionally murder their fathers....   [tags: essays papers]

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The Sculptures of the East and West Pediments of The Temple of Zeus at Olympia

- Use of Movement and Characterisation in the Sculptures of the East and West Pediments of The Temple of Zeus at Olympia The architectural sculpture of the Temple of Zeus at Olympia dates from between 465 and 457BC. Putting the temple into historical context, this was a somewhat flourishing time in Greek history, drama, and philosophy. In 490BC, the Athenians won a great victory at Marathon against the Persians, and in 480BC the Persians sacked Athens but were eventually defeated in a naval victory for the Athenians at Salamis....   [tags: Art History]

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Fate and How It Is Shown in Four Classic Novels

- Fate In the end God ultimately decides ones fate, but one can influence His choice throughout their life. The play Macbeth by William Shakespeare, as well as the books The Prince by Niccolo Machiavelli, Divine Comedy by Dante, and Oresteia by Aeschylus all talk about justice and fate. These stories show how even though God will decide what happens to someone at the end, the actions one does is how God bases his decision. One’s fate is determined based on what God and the law think is just. Human beings have free will and know what is right and wrong....   [tags: fate, god, action, human]

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Perspective of Women in the novel The Secret Agent

- Women living in London in the late 19th and early 20th century, did not have the choices of the 21st century women. Women had little chance of evading their societal approved destiny that consisted of marrying young, stay at home and raise a family. Despite the fact that change was on the horizon and many women took to finding work in factories and other domestic work, most women still had to rely on men for financial security and stability. Joseph Conrad portrays a woman who is very strategic and complex in her actions which places her in multiple roles....   [tags: joseph conrad, women roles, women rightts]

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Problems in the Revenge Tragedy: William Shakespeare's Hamlet

- Shakespeare's Hamlet presents the generic elements found in Renaissance revenge tragedies ("Revenge Tragedy"). However, although Hamlet is a revenge tragedy by definition, Shakespeare complicates the basic revenge plot by creating three revenge plots out of one. By adding significant innovations, Shakespeare creates "three concentric rings of revenge" (Frye 90), depicting an indecisive protagonist who is an intellectual rather than a physical hero, an ambiguous ghost, and several problematic aspects of the play, such as the reason for Hamlet's delay, the confusion of time, and the truth behind Hamlet's apparent madness....   [tags: Confusion of Time, Artificial Madness]

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Important Heros and Heroines in Greek Culture

- Group 10 Important Heros and Heroines in Greek Culture Heroes reflect the greatest strengths of the human condition, as well as highlighting the flaws of human nature itself. It is no surprise then that throughout the Greek world are found depictions of heros on various pieces of pottery. These pieces better help to understand what the people of the ancient Greek world were like and which heroic values they felt were worthy of art. When analyzing the art and the stories of such heroes, common themes tend to emerge of what the ancient Greeks thought were heroic values....   [tags: krater, pottery, Pelops, Oenomaus, Achilles]

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Oedipus The King Of All Tragic Heroes

- ... Second, Oedipus believes that he is the son of Polybus and Merope, who again are King and Queen but to the town on Corinth. Now even though this is a false statement it still adds nobility to the case of Oedipus because he is actually a son of a King and a Queen. The third and final nobility that Oedipus earns is when he solves the Sphinx’s riddle and frees the city. As reward Creon gives control of the city to Oedipus and creates a respect and attachment of him to the audience (Literature)....   [tags: Tragic hero, Tragedy, Sophocles, Aristotle]

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The Function of the Greek Chorus

- As man conquers the natural forces of the world, his mental focus shifts from simply surviving to answering humanity's enduring question: Why. Writers are inspired by the fabric of their society—current events, historical milestones, and popular morality. The Greeks' skill in weaving stories and imagery was so intricately powerful that a complete universe was created in their legends. The chorus was one of the primary tools for elegantly setting the stage for such detailed works. In Mythology, Edith Hamilton exalts the works of Aeschylus, which heavily employ the chorus for context, saying “With Homer, they are the most important source for our knowledge of the myths.” (17) The chorus prov...   [tags: Ancient Greece]

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Treatment of Women in Ancient Literature

- Women are constantly portrayed as tempting men by using their sexual charms. And so women who remained chaste were held in a higher esteem than those who highlighted their sexuality. Walcot writes, “The Greeks believed women to be incapable of not exercising their sexual charms and that the results were catastrophic, irrespective of whether or not women set out to cause trouble deliberately or acted in a blissful ignorance of what they were doing” (39). In Homeric tales we see the character Odysseus being held by Calypso and Circe due to their sexual appeal despite him journeying home to be reunited with his wife Penelope after twenty years....   [tags: sexual appeal, odysseus, calipo, pandora]

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The Aba Approved Paralegal Studies Program

-   The ABA-approved Paralegal Studies program enabled me to gain both academic and professional skills, from drafting documents in civil litigation matters to using trial presentation software. In the Family Law and Civil Litigation classes, I drafted several documents towards filing for divorce, temporary restraining orders, interrogatories, complaints, and responses using several case scenarios. The Paralegal Studies program focused on how technology is shaping the legal arena, from e-filing to legal research databases....   [tags: Law, Criminal justice, Lawyer, Learning]

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The Role of Spartan Women

- Unlike other Greek city states, women played an integral role in Spartan society as they were the backbone of the Spartan economic system of inheritance and marriage dowry and they were relied upon to fulfill their main responsibility of producing Spartan warrior sons. These principle economic systems affected wealth distribution among Spartan citizens especially among the Spartan elite class. Spartan women led a completely different life than women in most other ancient Greek city states, as they were depended upon to maintain Spartan social systems....   [tags: ancient history andd gender roles]

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Ritual Pollution and Homicide Cases

- ... The Greeks considered this land uncultivated, or improperly cultivated. Therefore, homicide outside of the polis did not have an impact on the citizens inside the city (Endsjø 2003). This only became a problem if the person who committed the act attempted to enter the city, or if parts of the deceased’s body somehow make their way into the city. The latter was a huge problem in Antigone, the play by Sophocles. Creon, the newly crowned ruler of Thebes, leaves the body of his former adversary, Polyneices, unburied outside of city walls....   [tags: ancient Greek rituals, beliefs, asylums]

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Devised Theatre or Collaborative Creation

- “Devised theatre can start from anything. It is determined and defined by a group of people who set up an initial framework or structure to explore and experiment with ideas, images, concepts, themes, or specific stimuli that might include music, text, objects, paintings, or movement.” (Alison Oddey 1). Devised theatre, also called collaborative creation, is a form of theatre in which the script is created through a collaborative process with the actors and the playwright, rather than the traditional method of theatre with a premade script....   [tags: forms of the dramatic arts]

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Clytemnestra: Not Another Homeric Savage

- The Greek interpretation of what makes a man “civilized” and what makes him “savage” is a recurring theme throughout the ancient epics, battle narratives, and dramas, including Aeschylus’ Agamemnon. In this first installment of The Oresteia, the chorus of Argive elders expresses keen outrage at the killing of Agamemnon, which suggests that they equate savagery with the madness they see in Clytemnestra: “just as your mind is maddened by the bloody deed, the blood-fleck in your eyes is clear to see” (1426-1427)....   [tags: Aeschylus's Agamemnon]

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Greek Theater and Tragedy

- Many ancient civilizations witnessed Greek theater and tragedy as the world’s first theatrical performances. Tragedy comes from the Greek word Tragos and Ole meaning goat song. The dithyramb, a song and dance performed in honor of the god Dionysus, was performed at a ceremony in Athens; it told the story of Dionysus’s life and his many adventures. Throughout the years the playwrights added things other than Dionysus’s life to the performance. They added other gods and some hero’s that made a name for themselves within the temple....   [tags: History: Ancient Greece, Drama]

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Plath’s Daddy Essays: Loss and Trauma

- Loss and Trauma in Plath’s Daddy In addition to the anger and violence, 'Daddy' is also pervaded by a strong sense of loss and trauma. The repeated 'You do not do' of the first sentence suggests a speaker that is still battling a truth she only recently has been forced to accept. After all, this is the same persona who in an earlier poem spends her hours attempting to reconstruct the broken pieces of her 'colossus' father. After 30 years of labor she admits to being 'none the wiser' and 'married to shadow', but she remains faithful to her calling....   [tags: Daddy Essays]

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Analysis of Aeschylus Agamemnon

- Analysis of Aeschylus Agamemnon Characters- The Watchman Clytaemnestra The Herald Agamemnon Cassandra Aegisthus The Chorus 1). The Watchman: • The watchman sets the time and place for the play (Agamemnon’s palace in Argos, the house of Atreus); he describes the many miserable nights he has spent on the rooftop of the palace watching for the signal fires that will herald the fall of Troy. • The watchman is one Aeschylus’s small characters, but like the herald he serves an important role as he not only sets the scene but also perhaps portrays the mood of Argos awaiting their king and soldiers return....   [tags: Greek Dramatist Plays Literature Essays]

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The Agamemnon of Aeschylus

- The Agamemnon of Aeschylus Prologue: The Watchman on the roof of the Palace of Agamemnon at Mycenae presents the facts. He has been watching a year for the fire signal that will announce Troy's capture, and all is not well within the house. He sees the beacon at last and will tell Clytemnestra, Agamemnon's wife. He rejoices at the news for it means his master will be coming home. Parodos or Entry of the Choros, who are Elders of Argos, counsellors to the Queen Regent. They chant about the expedition against Troy....   [tags: Papers]

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Agamemnon

- Agamemnon Agamemnon is the first play of Aeschylus’ trilogy, the Oresteia. Aeschylus was the first of Athens’ three great tragedians; the others: Sophocles; Euripides. The Oresteia was also the first Greek tragedy trilogy written. As Greeks of this epoch focused on humanist ideas, so did Aeschylus. He devoted his genius to serious contemplations of humanistic questions, such as the nature of justice. Other humanistic values are honor, truth, compassion, loyalty, devotion to family and gods. He credits much of his success to Homer’s epics....   [tags: Papers]

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History Other

- Mikey Ritualistic Sacrifice in Ancient Greek Mythology The ritual of sacrifice in Greek literature played a prominent role in societal influence, defining many aspects of their culture. Sacrifice was the foundation of moral concern, as well as an effective means of narrative development in Greek tragedy. The thematic reoccurrence of sacrifice in Greek literature reveals its symbolic importance. At a time when politics and religion were one in the same, sacrifice was crucial in regulating governmental issues....   [tags: essays research papers fc]

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Aeschylus

- Aeschylus was born in Eleusis, a Greek town near Athens, in 525 B.C. He was the first of the great Greek tragedians, preceding both Sophocles and Euripides, and is often credited with inventing tragic drama. Prior to Aeschylus, plays were primitive, consisting of a single actor and a chorus offering commentary. In his works, he added a "second actor" (often more than one) thus creating endless new dramatic possibilities. He lived until 456 B.C., fighting in the wars against Persia, and attaining great acclaim in the world of the Athenian theater....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Ancient Greek: The Birthplace of Western Civilization

- Ancient geek was the birthplace of western civilization about 4000 years ago. Ancient Greece produced many magnificent achievements in areas of government, science, philosophy and the fine arts that still influenced our lives. Old Greece influenced western progress in governmental issues. Greece had the first known popular government. In Greece Athens was the support of majority rules system in the western human advancement. The Greek had a state man who name is Pericles. Pericles had three objectives, to fortify majority rule government, hold quality in the realm and to commend the Athens....   [tags: philosophy, fine art, socrates]

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The Female on Trial

- The Female on Trial The theme of the first semester of my senior year at Bryn Mawr College, although I have lacked any gender coursework in my first three years of semesters, unexpectedly heavily involves the collision of the science, literature, and politics of gender. As my most last minute, haphazard schedule of any semester ever, on the next to last day of the shopping week period, I found myself adding two gender studies classes to my schedule. One entitled Advanced Topics in Developmental Psychology for my Psychology minor, and the other entitled, Interdisciplinary Perspectives of Sex and Gender....   [tags: Gender Studies Research papers]

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The People vs. Orestes

- The People v. Orestes In the last portion of 'The Orestia';, titled 'The Euminides';, Aeschlyus describes the trial of Orestes, who is brought in front of a jury on the charge of matricide. The jury hands in a tied verdict and the goddess Athena casts the deciding vote in favor of Orestes. This of course begs the question: Was Athena's decision fair. I believe that this decision was in the best interest of fairness because Orestes was motivated by Apollo, enraged by the murder of his father, and aggrieved by the vicious cycle of antisocial behavior that was running rampant in his family....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Tragic Hero: Agamenon by Aeschylus

- ... Agamemnon was just doing his job, but for very selfish reasons. He was being self serving, not only in Aulis, bur also in Troy, in Argos, and in Elysium. In the Illiad, after having sacked a city near Troy, women were taken as war prizes. A prize of war is considered property that was seized by the victors. While winning these prizes is an incentive to fight, it is not ethical to take war prizes. An ideal war (forgive the statement) is fought fairly and ethically, so the two sides can mend and forgive their grievances once the war has ended....   [tags: ancient Greek playwrights]

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