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The Handmaid's Tale

- In Margaret Atwood’s ‘The Handmaids Tale’, we hear a transcribed account of one womans posting ‘Offred’ in the Republic of Gilead. A society based around Biblical philosophies as a way to validate inhumane state practises. In a society of declining birth rates, fertile women are chosen to become Handmaids, walking incubators, whose role in life is to reproduce for barren wives of commanders. Older women, gay men, and barren Handmaids are sent to the colonies to clean toxic waste. Fear is power. Fear is ever-present in Gilead; it is implemented through violence and force....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale Essays]

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Analysis Of ' The Handmaid 's Tale '

- Offred is one of the Handmaid’s in the Republic of Gilead. This used to be known as the United States of America but now it is Gilead, a theocratic state. Because of an issue that occurred, women lost all of their money and rights. Handmaid’s were then assigned to higher class couples that were unable to have children, that was the new job for the Handmaid’s. Offred was assigned to the Commander and Serena Joy, his wife. Offred was once married to a man named Luke and they had a baby girl together....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

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Summary Of ' The Handmaid 's Tale '

- The Handmaid 's Tale is set in Republic of Gilead in Cambridge, MA. The narrator/protagonist is Offred she is a handmaid for the Commander and his wife Serena Joy. Offred like other handmaids in the Republic of Gilead main obligation is to bare a child for the couples they are assigned to. Exposition: The novel begins with a nameless narrator who will later be revealed as the protagonist Offred. The book opens with Offred vividly describing a room. The room is an old gymnasium, although, it’s a gym it’s similar to a prison Offred describes the building that the Gym is located “The guards weren 't allowed inside the building except when called, and we weren 't allowed out, except for our wal...   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

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Symbolism Of The Handmaid 's Tale

- The Handmaid’s Tale In the real world, different symbols are used to help people understand things, and to add different effects onto people’s lives. For example a pendent a women or man wears from the army helps someone understand what they’ve been through and helps portray them as a strong individual. In novels which may have complex story lines like The Handmaids tale it is important that these novels have some symbolism to help the reader decode what some details in the novel represent, helping them understand the plot more in-depth....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Science fiction]

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The Handmaid 's The Government

- In many places there 's always a Government established. Most of the time in some places women are treated unequally because of their sex. Although the Government is there to take control it ends up being destroyed people taking over and making their owns rules. People go around the Government 's system without them even knowing. In the novel Handmaid 's the Government was killed after The Republic Of Gilead assassinated the president and the congress and took over, made all women into breeding animals....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

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The 's Handmaid 's Tale

- The Unorthodox Characters of The Handmaid’s Tale “Rebels defy the rules of society, risking everything to retain their humanity” a quote by Joyce Johnson. Margret Atwood’s A Handmaid’s Tale is a futuristic novel, set in the Republic of Gilead that is a totalitarian Christian theocracy. The men and women are all separated into castes: the men by achievements, and the women by fertility. The novel is based around one of the Handmaids, Offred. She is specifically used to bear children, and that is all in this future....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

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The 's Of The Handmaid 's Tale

- “Reality Control” is the concept that with manipulated information, if all records showed the same, the lie will eventually pass into history and become truth. Traditionally dystopias hold characteristics such as propaganda used to control and manipulate citizens, whilst banning other independent thoughts and freedoms. The only way the illusion of a perfect society is maintained is generally through the manipulation of the state on the individual. Though there is a degree of manipulation to benefit the states own interests in both texts, the focus in Fahrenheit 451 is much more to benefit the state as a whole, where The Handmaid’s Tale manipulate situations to benefit the states control over...   [tags: Dystopia, Fahrenheit 451, The Handmaid's Tale]

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The Handmaid 's Tale

- The unorthodoxy of The Handmaid’s Tale Unorthodoxy is everywhere in peoples lives. It can be as simple as someone walking on the wrong side of the hallway; too as significant as a nation joining together to help overthrow the power in charge. Unorthodoxy is the single greatest threat to a governing body. Remove this threat and all your problems go away. Removing this threat is exactly what has happened in The Handmaid’s Tale. This novel is set in a dystopian society where the Gilead theocracy is in charge....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

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The Handmaid 's Tale And Kindred

- In regards to civic responsibility, women should have a choice on their level of involvement and contributions to society. Every woman has different circumstances and thus makes it impossible for one standard of involvement to be set. Every individual woman has a different level of comfort in regards to political involvement, work place involvement, reproductive involvement, and familial involvement; all of which contribute to the well being of society in different ways. Authors Margaret Atwood and Octavia Butler both support the idea of different roles for different women in their books The Handmaid’s Tale and Kindred....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood, Slavery]

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The Handmaid 's Tale By Margaret Atwood

- Built on the pillars on Puritanism, the United States of America has been largely divided over the debate of whether the fusion of politics and religion would be suitable to run a country. Margaret Atwood addresses this question in her novel, The Handmaid’s Tale. Published during the growing conservative era of the 1980s, The Handmaid’s Tale takes place in the fictional Republic of Gilead, where the religious extremists have grasped control of the government. The laws implemented by the Gileadean officials, largely based around religion, are meant to act on the issue of a declining birth rate....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Science fiction]

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The Handmaid 's Tale By Margaret Atwood

- “[W]e are not slaves in name, and cannot be carried to market and sold as somebody else 's legal chattels, we are free only within narrow limits. For all our talk about liberation and personal autonomy, there are few choices that we are free to make” (Berry). In The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood the protagonist Offred lives through a changing of society, in which is described by Aunt Lydia in the new society as the difference of freedom to and freedom from. The complexities of freedom are examined through social norms, relationships, and safety in society....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

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The Handmaid 's Tale By Margaret Atwood

- The Handmaid’s Tale In the novel, The Handmaid 's Tale, by Margaret Atwood, a totalitarian government in the Republic of Gilead conducts an important role throughout the novel. The government attempts to completely isolate women. Women in the society are completely separated from reality, having little touch with the outside world, and are then segregated further under their gender. Offred, a main character throughout the novel, is an example of how badly Gilead considered women. Women are under severe control with many limitations such as the need of a headscarf and the incapability to wear makeup....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

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The Handmaid 's Tale By Margaret Atwood

- “The Handmaid’s Tale”, a speculative fiction novel written by Margaret Atwood that describes an authoritarianism society created after the United States government was overthrown and became the Republic of Gilead. The objective of this takeover was to improve the environment, economy, and reverse the falling numbers in healthy births. All women’s rights were removed. They could not read, write, speak freely, or be in love. Their lives were controlled completely by Gilead. We are introduced to Offred, not her real name whose previous life with a husband, child, job, and money have all been taken away....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Science fiction]

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The Handmaid 's Tale By Margaret Atwood

- Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, published in 1985, explores the concept of a dystopian totalitarian Christian theocracy, the Republic of Gilead, that overthrows the United States government at an unspecified point in the near future. Gilead enforces a highly controlled patriarchal and militaristic society based on fundamentalist biblical principles. This new order is necessitated by widespread infertility caused by toxic pollution and sexually transmitted diseases, as well as many women ceasing to want children....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

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The Handmaid 's Tale By Margaret Atwood

- Margaret Atwood’s novel, The Handmaid’s Tale, can be described as a feminist novel. I think that reading this novel from a feminist perspective is the easiest way to analyze the text in this novel. While doing some research, Dictionary.com, states that the word feminism mean, “the doctrine advocating social, political, and all other tights of women to those of men.” In this particular novel, the wives and Handmaids pretty much serve the men. While conducting my research in this novel, I also sensed a slight form of Totalitarianism....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Science fiction]

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The Handmaid 's Tale By Margaret Atwood

- Maiden in Distress Freedom. Everybody desires it, but not everyone has it. In third world countries, many people fall victim to slavery and many more do not have the freedom to seek what they want. In "The Handmaid’s Tale” by Margaret Atwood the main character, Offred, struggles to find freedom in her prison like home called the Red Center, her uniform chains her to the life given to her, and she carries a hope that she will one day escape the Red Center. Offred is a handmaid that lives in the Red Center, a building in which the handmaids, the marthas, the aunts, the housewife, and the commander live in....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

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The Handmaid 's Tale By Margaret Atwood

- Every human being needs certain rights to survive. There are the fundamental ones; food, water, air, shelter, but there are also other ones that are equally important to survive: love, communication, compassion, freedom. In many dystopian societies one of these fundamental needs are missing because the society is afraid that they will break the control that they have over the people. In the novel The Handmaid’s tale by Margaret Atwood the society is no different. Narrated by a woman named Offred who once was happy who had a family and a job, she shows the reader that to keep people quiet the society takes away people 's freedom, their ability to choose, their ability to be with and talk to...   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

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The Handmaid 's Tale By Margaret Attwood

- Imagine a world where you are confined to a room, you have no say in what your day to day life holds, you have no say in anything that happens in your life. This is not an imagination it is reality for the Handmaids in The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Attwood. In this story the narrator Offred describes what it is like to be her about her existence in an oppressive organization in a theocratic dictatorship world. “A theocracy dictatorship is a form of government in which a deity is officially recognized as the civil ruler and official policy is governed by officials regarded as divinely guided, or is pursuant to the doctrine of a particular religion or religious group” (Wikipedia)....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

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The Handmaid 's Tale By Margaret Atwood

- The Handmaid`s Tale by Margaret Atwood is a novel that displays a vast amount of issues. One of those main themes in the novel is identity. In the Handmaid`s Tale the main character and narrator of our story deals with issues of identity. She battles throughout the story trying to find out who she is and remembering who she was. She constantly makes comparisons and contrasts with the life she is living in Gilead to the life she lived before the regime. As readers we notice the lack of identity of this character since the beginning....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

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The Handmaid 's Tale And The Hunger Games

- Handmaid’s Tale is a dystopian novel about a society, Gilead, that has been formed in the former Boston, Mass. area. The society is theocratic and patriarchal with all woman’s rights stripped away. A quote that briefly describes how women are viewed within in the society is "Gilead constructs women as seen objects instead of seeing subjects." (Kirkvik, Anette. "Gender Performativity in The Handmaid’s Tale and The Hunger Games." University of Norway, May 2015. Web). Men try to not only control women but also how women are viewed, to have total control....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Science fiction]

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The Handmaid 's Tale By Margaret Atwood

- Within every literary work there lies a resounding truth which perfectly displays the dangers of a broken world or society. In her novel The Handmaid’s Tale, Margaret Atwood uses different ideas in her novel to convey how passivity in a broken society has detrimental effects for everyone. Throughout the novel, it is displayed that in such a dystopian society, nothing can progress in the right direction if nobody has the courage to defy the system. Through Atwood’s context given throughout her text, her stance on passivity is clearly shown as one that urges others to stand and fight instead of becoming submissive to a fragmented society....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

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Article Analysis : ' The Handmaid 's Tale '

- Lizeth Garcia Distorted Religion Laws As you read through The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood, you immediately pick up on the abundant amounts of biblical references she has placed purposefully throughout the entire book. The first is the most obvious and easiest to spot. In the epigraph on page one of the novel, Atwood placed “and when Rachel saw that she bare Jacob no children, Rachel envied her sister; and said unto Jacob, Give me children, or else I die....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

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The Handmaid 's Tale By Margaret Atwood

- Rebelling The Handmaid 's Tale, by Margaret Atwood, was my favorite story we read all semester. The main character in the story, Offred, has one job to do and that is to have a baby with her commander. Offred has a friend named Moira that escaped from Republic of Gilead, so why is this story about Offred. Margaret wanted the story to be about Offred, because she will be able to get out and be free. Moira gets out, but she ends up in Jezebels. Jezebels is a place like a brotherly, I do not see this as her being free....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

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The Handmaid 's Tale By Margaret Atwood

- In the book, The Handmaid’s Tale, Margaret Atwood writes about an alternate universe about America that illustrates our worst fears. Some of the fears depicted in the book can be seen in the world today, such as the distaste for abortion and the mentality that men are supposed to have more power than women. These issues are not only known as social issues but also feminist issues. Feminism is the belief that women and men should be treated equally socially, politically, and economically. This book shows how these issues could get worse in our society....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

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The Handmaid 's Tale By Margaret Atwood

- In Margaret Atwood 's The Handmaid 's Tale, society is meant to have overcome the sinful tendencies of modern culture. People who would rebel against the new status quo are broken through torture and conditioning. The character Moira acts as a symbol of the main characters, Offred 's, hope and need for rebelliousness. The perceived loss of this hope causes Offred to begin a spiral of indifference which leads her to cling to Nick as a replacement and a way to find meaning in an extra meaningless life....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

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The Handmaid 's Tale By Margaret Atwood

- In The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood, there is an apparent power struggle between Offred and the Commander. The Gilead Society’s structure is based off of order and command. This is what creates a divide between genders and specifies gender roles in this novel. Without this categorization of the roles and expectations of women, the society would fall apart at the base. Thus, the Commander, being the dominant gender set forth by the society, has control over Offred. Offred is consistently cautious when it comes to interacting with the Commander....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

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The Handmaid 's Tale By Margaret Atwood

- The Handmaid 's tale is a dystopian novel written by Margaret Atwood in 1985. The novel takes place in the not too distant future where because of disease and war the government of the United States is replaced by a new theocratic society called Republic of Gilead. The new government which is established uses the bible as a base. The bible is also used as a justification system to all the new laws and also to justify what is moral. In theory, you would expect a perfect society if religion was used to rule, however Atwood shows the reader many reasons why that would may not be true....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

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The Handmaid 's Tale By Margaret Atwood

- The story The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood illustrates a different type of dystopia from most other classic dystopian novel. It creates a world where women are used either for sexual reproduction or as a way to control other women who will be used for the same purpose. Attwood tells the story of America after the Gilead regime has taken over and sets things “in order” following a long period of anarchy which is referred to as the “time before” (Atwood, 5). The Gilead regime has taken control of the direr straights that the country has entered with reference to the birth rate....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

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The Handmaid 's Tale : Gender Inequality

- Gender Inequality in A Handmaid’s Tale In Margaret Atwood’s novel The Handmaid’s Tale, social turmoil after a staged terrorist attack has led to a totalitarian Christian regime. In this dystopian future, the roles of men and women are much different than in today’s society. In The Handmaid’s Tale, women are unequal because they have no choice about their bodies, their dress, or their relationships. In The Handmaid’s Tale there are three types of women: handmaids (the breeders), wives (the trophies), and the marthas (servants.) The narrator of the novel is Offred, who is a handmaid....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood, Gender]

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The Handmaid 's Tale By Margret Atwood

- In Margret Atwood’s “The Handmaid’s Tale a woman named Offred shares her experience in the Republic of Gilead as a housemaid. As the story begins, we find that the regime strategically encroaches the rights of women, independence and seizes anything they thought to be pleasurable deeming it contraband. This includes clothing, literature especially old magazines, and cosmetics. Offred, remembers a time when she was married to her husband Luke with a job and having her own financial backing. However one day it all changes when she get fired from her job and when she tries to go to the bank they won’t allow her to get her money out....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood, Bible]

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The Handmaid 's Tale By Margaret Atwood

- An important issue in today’s society is the gender inequality of men and women in the labor force. There are many different aspects that add to this issue as a whole, two of the most important ones including the differences in wages of men and women, and the view that women should stay at home and raise their children. The Handmaid’s Tale, by Margaret Atwood, provides an interesting view on this subject, showing what would happen if this issue was left untouched through a world ruled by men. Although this issue has been addressed in some ways in the past, there are many unturned stones where improvements should be made to ensure an equilibrium in men 's respect for women, and vice versa....   [tags: Gender, Gender role, The Handmaid's Tale]

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The Handmaid 's Tale, By Margaret Atwood

- Margaret Atwood’s novel “The Handmaid’s Tale” and both Bruce Dawes poems “Enter without So Much as Knocking” “Weapons Training” offers insights into the challenges presented in the modern world with respect to moral or spiritual values, identity and relationships despite the different context. Atwood’s novel contextualises the 1980’s Feminist Movement using the patriarchal Republic of Gilead to dehumanise women in a futuristic, dystopian society. Whereas Dawe’s poems address his opposition to the dehumanising process of wars and degradation of modern values via media propaganda and brainwashing through influential people to form a dominate society....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood, Morality]

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The Misogyny Of The Handmaid 's Tale By Margaret Atwood

- Flawless Flawed Women; The Internalized Misogyny in The Handmaid’s Tale Women, are socialized to internalize a hatred of femininity and espouse the belief that they “aren’t like other girls” to separate ourselves from the generalizations. Phrases like “Women are catty” “Women constantly gossip, and are shallow” “Boys have less drama” homogenize the entire female gender down to a few negative stereotypes. When women perpetuate sexist stereotypes it is called internalized misogyny. Women are guilty of perpetuating misogyny as often as men....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

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Margaret Atwood 's The Handmaid 's Tale

- Margaret Atwood’s novel The Handmaid’s Tale is a story heavily influenced by the Bible and has many biblical themes that are used to prove Atwood’s belief in balance. The novel is set in the Republic of Gilead which was formerly the United States. The story is told through the perspective of a handmaid named Offred and begins when she is placed at her third assignment as a housemaid. Offred describes her society as a fundamentalist theocracy where the Christian God is seen as the divine Ruler over the Republic of Gilead....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

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Margaret Atwood 's The Handmaid 's Tale

- Margaret Atwood takes readers through a dark, dystopian experience in her work “The Handmaid’s Tale”, where woman no longer have any use beyond childbearing. This work was completely based on a dystopian society, under complete government control. In order for Atwood to take her readers on this journey she incorporated key literary devices. When it comes to characterization Atwood main tactic is to separate woman in seven different categories; Handmaids, Wives, Daughters, Martha’s, Aunts, and Econowives or Unwoman....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

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Censorship Of The Handmaid 's Tale By Margaret Atwood

- Psychologically, censorship is a form of negativism because it is a type of repression caused by the fear of consequences. In the novel The Handmaid 's Tale by Margaret Atwood, censorship is used to manipulate individuals such as Handmaids, into following the laws of their society called Gilead. This book focuses on the negativism in the presence of censorship in a society, and portrays the consequences that come along with it. In this novel, censorship results Handmaids as well as other citizens of Gilead to become narrow minded, following such uncertainty, and essentially being trapped from freedom....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

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Margaret Atwood 's The Handmaid 's Tale

- The Theme of Apathy in Margaret Atwood’s “The Handmaid’s Tale” In life, people don’t always stand up for what they believe in in order to avoid exclusion – this is called apathy. In specific situations, people will blindly follow a primitive ideology without any regard for morality. Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale is an excellent example of how apathy can affect an entire population. This novel is by and large a feminist novel that addresses the ignorance in imperialistic and religious ideologies, but also addresses the issue of human apathy....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Science fiction]

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Margaret Atwood 's The Handmaid 's Tale

- If this were to be a world similar to that of Offred’s in Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, then this very essay would never even exist. This would be a world in which a woman would certainly not be allowed to sit at a computer and type out her thoughts. Writing, speaking, singing; these are all ways a woman, or any other person, can communicate their own feelings. However, being able to communicate one’s thoughts is not a privilege women can enjoy in Gilead. Women are allowed neither to read nor write, and even their everyday speech must be restrained....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

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Margaret Atwood 's The Handmaid 's Tale

- Many people do not recognize the strategies writers and speakers use to influence their audiences’ opinions. They believe that their opinions were constructed based solely on facts. Although establishing one’s own opinions based on facts is ideal, this is usually not the case. By means of the Aunt’s lessons in The Handmaid’s Tale, Margaret Atwood argues that individuals use verbal techniques, such as word choice, tone, and repetition, to suppress others’ conflicting viewpoints and to promote their own....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

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Margaret Atwood 's The Handmaid 's Tale

- Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale paints a picture of the United States’ future. The nation has shifted into a religiously focused patriarchy with a low birth rate. The pressure to reproduce creates a harsh, rule-bound environment. The clothing, in particular, becomes very symbolic to the people in the Republic of Gilead. In modern day America, hospitals use colors to symbolize gender of newborns but Atwood’s future takes it a step further to say that the color of women’s dresses and men’s uniforms differentiate their designated roles....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

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Margaret Atwood 's The Handmaid 's Tale

- Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale provides a look into a dystopian world of complete male dominance. Women have been entirely denied of their basic needs, and are no longer able to live as individuals. For decades preceding the creation of Gilead, women were regarded as subordinate to men. These inequalities often led women to believe they were inferior and lacked the knowledge and power men seemed to display. They were not granted access to voting rights, equal wages, or job opportunities. As the years progressed, women fought for equal rights; however, these accomplishments were soon revoked with the transition of the United States, into a totalitarian region known as The Republic of G...   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

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How Postmodernism Defines Bartleby 's The Handmaid Tale

- How postmodernism defines ambiguity in The Handmaids Tale Postmodernism in art and literature includes many aspects that define a novel or piece of writing to be “postmodern”. A postmodern novel often leaves the reader ambiguous to some of the most obvious forms of literature, but this ambiguity serves a purpose to the postmodernism in the metafictional story that embeds the theme or the purpose of the novel. One of the greatest examples of postmodern fiction/literature would be The Handmaids Tale by Margret Atwood....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

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Kate Chopin 's The And Handmaid 's Tale

- Throughout our Modern Women Writers course, we studied many novels which focus on women and why they play a significant role in each novel. Three novels that represent women in both negative and positive ways are Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant by Anne Tyler, The Awakening by Kate Chopin, and The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood. Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant and The Awakening both represent women who do not care for their family, which goes against the “ideal” role of a woman. The Handmaids Tale also goes against the “ideal” role of women as Offred’s mother is a raging feminist....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

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Margaret Atwood 's The Handmaid 's Tale

- Ryan Lee 11-21-14 AP Literature Period 7 The Handmaids Tale Essay Whether women are equal to men or not this is an ongoing topic that brings to light many different opinions. The Handmaid’s Tale, by Margaret Atwood, is a fictional yet plausible story that Atwood uses to warn us of the possibility of our society changing into her dystopian fantasy. To convey her argument, Atwood uses the point of view of a women named Offred to demonstrate the morals and struggles of women in this male-dominated society known as Gilead....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

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Margaret Atwood 's The Handmaid 's Tale

- Many texts that were published from different authors have introduced topics that can be related in today’s society, but Margaret Atwood’s creation called, “The Handmaid’s Tale”, gives voice to the thoughts and revolves around the narrator Offred, a woman whose rights have been deprived due to political issues. However, the information shared by Offred to the reader to the text is not reliable for the reason that she only touches upon her own perspective. Through the text, Atwood depicted what the United States of America would be in the future based on the actions of humanity during 1980’s....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

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Margaret Atwood 's The Handmaid 's Tale

- When first reading Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, it is easy to dismiss the scene where Serena Joy proposes the arrangement between Offred and Nick. The scene does not seem so important because Offred would have had the affair with Nick later in the novel anyway. However, this scene is critical to the novel because it furthers the plot and sets up for an emotional and thematic end. This scene is very important because it furthers the plot. Firstly, Offred sees Serena Joy on her way back to the house from her shopping trip with Ofglen....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood]

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Free Handmaid's Tale Essays: The Handmaid's Dystopia

- The Handmaid's Dystopia "The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood is a dystopia about a world where unrealistic things take place. The events in the novel could never actually take place in our reality." This is what most people think and assume, but they're wrong. Look at the world today and in the recent past, and there are not only many situations that have ALMOST become a Gilead, but places that have been and ARE Gileadean societies. We're not in Kansas any more, Dorothy. Even today there are places in the world where there is startling similarity to this fictitious dystopia....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays]

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George Orwell 's The Handmaid 's Tale

- Thesis Statement: Both 1984 by George Orwell and The Handmaid 's Tale by Margaret Atwood are similar as they are placed in dystopian societies with governments that have complete control over their citizens, however, the roles of the narrator in both novels contrast each other. In 1984, the point of view is Limited Omniscient while the point of view in The Handmaid 's Tale is first person. 1 Topic Sentence: As there are differences in the narration of both the novels, 1984 and the Handmaid 's Tale, the role of the narrators will be quite different as readers see different perspectives in each novel....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Nineteen Eighty-Four]

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Marxist Theory : The Handmaid 's Tale By Margaret Atwood

- The Marxist theory “is the belief that the struggle between social classes is a major force in history and that there should eventually be a society in which there are no classes” – Karl Marx In the book “The Handmaid’s Tale” by Margaret Atwood there are significant examples of the Marxist theory because of the way social classes are represented, how religion is manipulated in the society, and what values the text reinforces in the reader. For instance, the way the social classes in the novel are being represented is an example of the presence of the Marxist theory in the novel....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Sociology, Karl Marx]

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Margaret Atwood 's Handmaid 's Tale

- In her novel, Handmaid’s Tale, Margaret Atwood conceives a dystopian society, set sixteen years from now, in which the United States has become the New Republic of Gilead. This version of the future takes root because of a nuclear and biological war that leaves many women unable to reproduce. Thus, those who are still fertile are treated as illicit liaisons for rich older couples who want a child but cannot. These fertile women are called “handmaids,” a term referring to a story in the Bible, where Rachel sends her handmaid to Jacob to bear him a child in her stead....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Science fiction, Dystopia]

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An Analysis Of ' Fahrenheit 451 And The Handmaid 's Tale '

- A common feature in the dystopian genre is a unique protagonist, who holds views which are not necessarily in concordance with society’s regime. Both Fahrenheit 451 and The Handmaid’s Tale display protagonists’ trapped in a situation undesirable to them, yet are powerless to do anything about it. This is due to the oppression which is essential in any dystopian society. However, unlike most people in these societies, Guy Montag and Offred actually realise they live as part of an unjust regime. The two characters are nonconformists to the extent that they both dare to be different in the totalitarian regime that surrounds them, as commented by Devon Ryan, “the protagonist does not always have...   [tags: Fahrenheit 451, Dystopia, The Handmaid's Tale]

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Analysis Of Margaret Atwood 's ' A Handmaid 's Tale '

- For centuries, men have been known as the superior sex. Dominant and controlling. Most of the time, they receive what they ask for with no questions. In Margaret Atwood’s novel, A Handmaid’s Tale, a male character known as the Commander is not the only one in control. The Commander is the one most fear, the one who calls the shots and who usually gets what he wants but that is also the case for Serena Joy, the Commander’s wife. Both Serena Joy and the Commander have control of what goes on in the lives of the Handmaids....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood, Control]

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A Handmaid's Tale

- A Handmaid's Tale A new society is created by a group of people who strengthen and maintain their power by any means necessary including torture and death. Margaret Atwood's book, A Handmaid's Tale, can be compared to the morning after a bad fight within an abusive relationship. Being surrounded by rules that must be obeyed because of being afraid of the torture that will be received. There are no other choices because there is control over what is done, who you see and talk to, and has taken you far away from your family....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays]

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The Handmaid's Tale as a Biblical Allusion

- The Handmaid's Tale: A Biblical Allusion Imagine a country where choice is not a choice.  One is labeled by their age and economical status.  The deep red cloaks, the blue embroidered dresses, and the pinstriped attire are all uniforms to define a person's standing in society.  To be judged, not by beauty or personality or talents, but by the ability to procreate instead. To not believe in the Puritan religion is certain death.  To read or write is to die.  This definition is found to be true in the book, The Handmaid's Tale (1986) by Margaret Atwood....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays]

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Portents of the Monotheocracy in The Handmaid's Tale

- Portents of the Monotheocracy in The Handmaid's Tale        American society has had certain cultural and political forces which have proliferated over the past few decades-described as the return to traditional Christian values. Television commercials promoting family values followed by endorsements from specific denominations are on the rise. As the public has become more aware of a shift in the cultural and political climate through the mass media, Margaret Atwood, in writing The Handmaid's Tale, could have been similarly affected by this growing awareness of the public consciousness....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays]

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The Handmaid's Tale and Family Values

- The Handmaid's Tale and Family Values In the olden days, religion and politics went hand in hand. The church either ran the land or had a strangle hold on the people. If the church thought there was one way to do something, one had to do as the church requested or suffer great penalty. To go against the church was to go against God, and that meant death. The king was supposed to be chosen by God to rule the people in the way he commanded. The king was the closest thing to God on earth....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays]

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The Importance of the Narrator of The Handmaid's Tale

- The Importance of the Narrator of The Handmaid's Tale The creation of Offred, the passive narrator of Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale, was intentional. The personality of the narrator in this novel is almost as important as the task bestowed upon her. Atwood chooses an average women, appreciative of past times, who lacks imagination and fervor, to contrast the typical feminist, represented in this novel by her mother and her best friend, Moira. Atwood is writing for a specific audience, though through careful examination, it can be determined that the intended audience is actually the mass population....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays]

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Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale

- Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale In "The Handmaid's Tale", Margaret Atwood tells a saddening story about a not-to-distant future where toxic chemicals and abuses of the human body have resulted in many men and women alike becoming sterile. The main character, Offred, gives a first person encounter about her subservient life as a handmaid in the Republic of Gilead, a republic formed after a bloody coup against the United States government. She and her fellow handmaids are fertile women that the leaders of Gilead, the Commanders, enslave to ensure their power and the population of the Republic....   [tags: Atwood Handmaid's Tale Essays]

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The Twisted Beliefs of Gilead in Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale

- In Margaret Atwood’s, The Handmaid’s Tale, one will find a town, Gilead, whose people have brainwashed themselves and created their own twisted truths about life. The people of this town are irrational; they tend to believe the things that they hear. The people of Gilead then take it and turn it into semi-truths and lies. Winston Churchill once said, “A lie gets halfway around the world before the truth has a chance to get their pants on.” Their truths do nothing but harm others in the community....   [tags: The Handmaid’s Tale]

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Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale

- I Tell, Therefore I Am In Margaret Atwood’s, The Handmaid’s Tale, women are subjected to unthinkable oppression. Practically every aspect of their life is controlled, and they are taught to believe that their only purpose is to bear children for their commander. These “handmaids” are not allowed to read, write or speak freely. Any type of expression would be dangerous to the order of the Gilead’s strict society. They are conditioned to believe that they are safer in this new society. Women are supposedly no longer exploited or disrespected (pornography, rape, etc.) as they once were....   [tags: Margaret Atwood The Handmaid's Tale]

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Feminism Lost in Margaret Atwood’s A Handmaid’s Tale

- In Margaret Atwood’s A Handmaid’s Tale, the human spirit has evolved to such a point that it cannot be subdued by complacency. Atwood shows Gilead as an extremist state with strong religious connotations. We see the outcome of the reversal of women’s rights and a totalitarian government which is based on reproduction. Not only is the government oppressive, but we see the female roles support and enable the oppression of other female characters. “This is an open ended text,…conscious of the possibilities of deconstruction, reconstruction, and reinterpretation … Atwood engages in metafictional commentary …in her storytelling and by the time the reader arrives at the text, Atwood has already to...   [tags: The Handmaid’s Tale Essays]

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The Handmaid's Tale

- The Handmaid's Tale The Handmaids Tale, written by Margaret Attwood, goes on to explore the consequences that come to be from the reversal of womens rights in a society called Gilead. It is what one can consider a cautionary tale. In the new world of Gilead, a group of conservative religious extremists have taken power, and have turned the sexual revolution upside down. The society of Gilead is founded on what is to be considered a return to traditional values, gender roles and the subjugation of women by men, and the Bible is used as the guiding principle....   [tags: Margaret Atwood Handmaid's Tale Essays]

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Imagery in the Handmaid’s Tale

- There are two kinds of freedom: freedom to, and freedom from. Historically, women in the United States have fought philosophical battles in and out of the home to achieve "freedom to" and have been successful. But what if society suddenly took away these freedoms. What if American women were suddenly returned to their cloistered state of old in which their only freedom was the freedom from the dangers of the surrounding world. Then again, did women ever truly achieve "freedom to" at all....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays]

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Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale

- Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale The Historical Notes are important in the way we perceive the novel as they answer many important questions raised by the novel and also enhance some of the novels main themes. The first question it answers is the one raised at the end of the novel; that is whether Offred is stepping up into the,'darkness,' or the, 'light.' The reader finds out that Offred escaped Gilead, presumably into Canada, with the help of the,'Underground Femaleroad.' The reader also learns that it was Nick who orchestrated her escape, using his position as a member of the Eyes....   [tags: Atwood Handmaid's Tale Essays]

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Interpreting The Handmaid's Tale

- Interpreting The Handmaid's Tale The Handmaid's Tale is distinguished by its various narrative and structural divisions. It contains four different levels of narrative time: the pre-Revolution past, the time of the Revolution itself, the Gileadean period, and the post-Gileadean period (LeBihan 100). In addition, the novel is divided into two frames, both with a first person narrative. Offred's narrative makes up the first frame, while the second frame is provided by the Historical Notes, a transcript of a lecture given by a Cambridge professor....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays]

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Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale

- Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale Love of God replaces love of humanity in Margaret Atwood’s, The Handmaid’s Tale. Offred’s recollections of her past life, especially of her husband, are ones filled with passion and happiness as she remembers his tenderness towards her. Much more emphasis is put on the physical human form in her memories; she often remembers lying with her husband while she wears little or no clothing. Appreciation of the human form is an essential component of loving humanity....   [tags: Margaret Atwood Handmaid Tale Essays]

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Margaret Atwood 's The Tulips Somewhat Symbolize The Handmaid 's

- "They are, after all, empty. When they are old they turn themselves inside out, then explode slowly, the petals thrown away like shards" ( Atwood 45). In the novel, the tulips somewhat symbolize the handmaid 's. Atwood is referring to how the handmaids have become empty. She might mean empty as not pregnant or referring to their mental state of loneliness and despair. The tulips explode slowly which mirrors how the Handmaids are dying slowly and suffering under Gilead 's rule and commanders. Atwood might be criticizing how some men are suppressing women around the world....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood, Woman]

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Essay on the Religious Right and The Handmaid's Tale

- The Religious Right and The Handmaid's Tale The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood is set in the near future in the Republic of Gilead, formerly the United States. A religious extremist right-wing movement assassinated the president and congress and took complete control of the government. The constitution was suspended and liberties revoked. Women found themselves completely subordinated in the new regime, generally assigned to the legal care of a male "guardian." Offred, the main character of the story, was fortunate in many ways....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays]

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Essay on A Society of Oppression in A Handmaid's Tale

- A Society of Oppression in A Handmaid's Tale      As the saying goes, 'history repeats itself.' If one of the goals of Margaret Atwood was to prove this particular point, she certainly succeeded in her novel A Handmaid's Tale. In her Note to the Reader, she writes, " The thing to remember is that there is nothing new about the society depicted in The Handmaiden's Tale except the time and place. All of the things I have written about ...have been done before, more than once..." (316). Atwood seems to choose only the most threatening, frightening, and atrocious events in history to parallel her book by--specifically the enslavement of African Americans in the United States....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays]

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Essay on the Character of Offred in The Handmaid's Tale

- The Character of Offred in The Handmaid's Tale Offred is one of the main characters in The Handmaid's Tale. She was the faithful wife of Luke, mother of an eleven month old child and a working woman, before she entered the Republic of Gilead. She was given the name "Offred", when she entered Gilead. This was to make it known that she was a handmaid. Offred becomes psychologically programmed in Gilead as a handmaid, and the mistress of the commander who is in power of all things....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays]

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Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale

- Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale Chapter nine opening section two of the novel is mainly recalling the last chapters and about the narrator rediscovering herself, surfacing the truth. In section one we see the narrator talking in the present tense in a very descriptive form, outlining the novel. However in section two we see her talking in the past tense demonstrating the stories she is telling. The separation between the human and the natural world and the narrator’s struggle with language most directly portrays the novel's dualities....   [tags: Margaret Atwood Handmaid's Tale Essays]

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The Dystopia in Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale

- The Dystopia in Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale Offred is a Handmaid in what used to be the United States, now the theocratic Republic of Gilead. In order to create Gilead's idea of a more perfect society, they have reverted to taking the Book of Genesis at its word. Women no longer have any privileges; they cannot work, have their own bank accounts, or own anything. The also are not allowed to read or even chose who they want to marry. Women are taught that they should be subservient to men and should only be concerned with bearing children....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays]

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The Handmaid 's Tale By A Dystopian Society Driven By Numerous Abuses On Women

- The Handmaid’s Tale is a story of a dystopian society driven by numerous abuses on women. The concept of intellectual abuse of power is very broad in manner of punishing women in the state of Gilead. The main character, Offred, demonstrates how the ideology of the upper class government in Gilead is used to suppress and abuse the lower class woman, by the Commanders and the Aunts; who fall under a high-up in Gilead’s hierarchy. She is forced to enter the cruel place like Gilead, where woman are treated worst than animals....   [tags: The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood, Abuse]

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Essay on The Handmaid's Tale as a Warning to Society

- The Handmaid's Tale as a Warning to Society Margaret Atwood's renowned science fiction novel, The Handmaid's Tale, was written in 1986 during the rise of the opposition to the feminist movement. Atwood, a Native American, was a vigorous supporter of this movement. The battle that existed between both sides of the women's rights issue inspired her to write this work. Because it was not clear just what the end result of the feminist movement would be, the author begins at the outset to prod her reader to consider where the story will end....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays]

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Offred's Narrative Technique in The Handmaid's Tale

- Offred affects every single aspect of "The Handmaid's Tale", so, in order to understand her narrative technique better, her character must also be considered.             Offred is nostalgic, she longs for her pre-Gilead past with which she still identifies very strongly. She is, however, realistic in her longing; she knows that the past was not perfect, that it was no utopia, but she just longs for a situation preferable to her present one, "...We lived, as usual, by ignoring...". Another strong reason for to long for the past is that she was basically happy there, she had a daughter and a lover, both of which she was removed from by the Gilead regime....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays]

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Free Handmaid's Tale Essays: An Analysis

- The Handmaid's Tale The novel, The Handmaid's Tale, by Margaret Atwood focuses on the choices made by the society of Gilead in which the preservation and security of mankind is more highly regarded than freedom or happiness. This society has undergone many physical changes that have led to extreme psychological ramifications. I think that Ms. Atwood believes that the possibility of our society becoming as that of Gilead is very evident in the choices that we make today and from what has occured in the past....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays]

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Atwood's Attention to Words in The Handmaid's Tale

- Atwood's Attention to Words in The Handmaid's Tale The Handmaids Tale illustrates that dictatorship can be established by creating a state of fear once language controls are instituted. As a tradition to dystopian novels, Atwood has drawn much attention to the meaning of words and the significance of names, as well as the prohibition for women to read or write, in order to portray Gilead as a successful totalitarian state. Atwood is trying to make the point that in a dystopian world, language can be the power....   [tags: Margaret Atwood The Handmaid's Tale Essays]

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Free Handmaid's Tale Essays: The Struggle of Women

- The Struggle of Women in The Handmaid's Tale The Handmaid's Tale This is a futuristic novel that takes place in the northern part of the USA sometime in the beginning of the twenty-first century, in the oppressive and totalitarian Republic of Gilead. The regime demands high moral retribution and a virtuous lifestyle. The Bible is the guiding principle. As a result of the sexual freedom, free abortion and high increase of venereal diseases at the end of the twentieth century, many women, (and men also, but that is forbidden to say), are sterile....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays]

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Symbolism and Loss of Identity in The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood

- Symbolism and Loss of Identity in The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood In Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale, Offred recounts the story of her life and that of others in Gilead, but she does not do so alone. The symbolic meanings found in the dress code of the women, the names/titles of characters, the absence of the mirror, and the smell and hunger imagery aid her in telling of the repugnant conditions in the Republic of Gilead. The symbols speak with a voice of their own and in decibels louder than Offred can ever dare to use....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays Atwood ]

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Free Handmaid's Tale Essays: The Red Motif

- The Red Motif in The Handmaid's Tale In the dystopian novel "The Handmaid's Tale" written by Margaret Atwood, the recurrent appearance of the color red draws an interesting yet perverse parallel between femininity and violence. The dominant color of the novel, red is associated with all things female. However, red is also the color of blood; death and violence therefore are closely associated with women in this male-dominated ultraconservative government. We are first introduced to the color red when the narrator is describing how she gets dressed: "The red gloves are lying on the bed....   [tags: Handmaid's Tale Essays]

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