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Your search returned over 400 essays for "greek tragedies"
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Thematic Antithesis in Greek Tragedies - Thematic Antithesis in Greek Tragedies The binary oppositions in Euripides plays, Medea and Bacchae, emphasize the structural techniques seen throughout both of the plays works are “[described as] a pair of theoretical opposites or thematic contrasts” (Marvin 1). The themes are highly symmetrical throughout and typical of the structure of Greek tragedies. Euripides use of thematic antithesis gives greater irony within Greek plays. The gender roles of female and male challenge the traditional stereotypical roles as observed in Greek society, and when those roles are crossed or blurred, the rational becomes irrational and the order of civilized Greek society itself falls into disorder....   [tags: Medea, Bacchae, Gnder Roles, Greek Society]
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1349 words
(3.9 pages)
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Greek Tragedies in a Modern World - Greek Tragedies in a Modern World *Works Cited Not Included From the times of Aristotle to modern day Boal people have tried to come up with a definition of tragedy that encompasses all of the works they feel to be tragedies. However, there are always a few exceptions to their rules that make their thesis insubstantial. Those who define tragedies all have different elements that they say are necessary in classifying something as a tragedy. Unfortunately for us, no one definition has ever been settled upon that everyone agrees with....   [tags: Papers] 871 words
(2.5 pages)
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Ancient Greek Tragedies: Passion vs. Prudence - Greek tragedies often teach readers several valuable lessons, one of which is the catastrophe caused by acting on emotions. Both Oedipus and Antigone experience this as a result of their rash behavior. Even Creon ends up miserable in Antigone due to the change in his behavior. By acting on their emotions, these characters all experience tragic downfalls, while others, such as Ismene and Creon during Oedipus Rex, remain safe due to their prudence and indications of wisdom. Due to the actions she took based on her emotions, Antigone suffered a far worse fate than Ismene....   [tags: catastrophe, emotions, prophecy] 945 words
(2.7 pages)
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The Role of the Chorus in Ancient Greek Tragedies - The chorus’s perspective of justice works differently in Euripides’ Medea and Aeschylus’ The Libation Bearers. In both The Libation Bearers and Medea, the driving force of vengeance links the chorus to each of the play’s protagonists. For both plays, the choruses begin with a strong support of their heroes with a belief that the course of action that those characters are pursuing for the sake of avenging the wrongs done to them or their families is just and right. The chorus of Medea, however, moves away from that original conviction in the moral justification of revenge....   [tags: Libation Bearers, Medea and Aeschylus] 1153 words
(3.3 pages)
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Vengeance and Dramatic Conflict in Electra and Orestes - Introduction:- Since Sophocles and Euripides’s tragedies Electra and Orestes got so much success, name and received great critical acclaim they have been extensively approached and discussed in terms of characterization, themes, symbols, plot, incestuous love, demolition, betrayal and especially lamentation. For instance, Vengeance is the soul of the both plays and it is largely discussed as major themes of the play. But its connection with the tragedy of characters is far away better to be discussed....   [tags: Sophocles and Euripides Greek tragedies]
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1837 words
(5.2 pages)
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The Eumenides versus the Bacchae - The conflict between the rational and the irrational is present in every person or situation. In Greek tragedies, this conflict is constantly present within the characters’ actions and decisions. Usually, there is always one character that will act rationally compared to the others and would try to fix the conflict. Both The Eumenides and The Bacchae depict the conflict between the rational and the irrational, yet the act and solution are presented differently. Whereas The Eumenides portrays it through killing the family by committing matricide and homicide, The Bacchae portrays it through killing the family by committing unconscious homicide driven by the desire of the forbidden....   [tags: conflict in Greek tragedies] 1223 words
(3.5 pages)
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Tragic Heroines: Medea and Clytemnestra - Aristotle (384-322 B.C. believed that tragedy, as an imitation or mimesis of life as it could be, held more importance than history, which simply records the past. He considered that performance of a tragedy provided the perfect cathartic experience for an audience, leaving them spiritually purified and inspired. He felt spectators seeing and experiencing great hardship befall the play’s hero or heroine would achieve this emotional state and benefit from it. The tragic hero, according to Aristotle, must be essentially good and be of high or noble birth....   [tags: Aristotle, Greek tragedies, literature]
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981 words
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The Bacchae by Euripides - One of the most well-known pieces of Greek tragedy is Euripides’s The Bacchae, a tale which chronicles the life and ultimate revenge that the Greek god Dionysus would take out upon his mortal family. Through this tale Dionysus can be viewed in multiple lights. He varied his appearance from that of a great leader, to that of a master of the great art of manipulation. With that said, no image was grander than how he showed that the great Greek gods are not known for being forgiving creatures. Dionysus proved this by being utterly brutal and relentless....   [tags: acient Greek tragedies] 837 words
(2.4 pages)
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Sophocles' Use of Social Commentary in Antigone - Art has the power to reach people across space and time. Although artists primarily use creative media to disseminate their ideas and emotions to a contemporary audience, great art has the ability to reach whoever appreciates it no matter their origin. In Antigone, Sophocles does this by creating a fictionalized Thebes in which he reflects upon the politics, religion, and societal norms of his own world. He creates a ruler, Creon, whose tyrannical actions serve to promote the merits of democracy and criticize the contemporary government....   [tags: ancient Greek tragedies]
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1323 words
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Oedipus Rex by Sophocles - Is truth always the right way. When is there a time when too much truth is revealed. In Oedipus Rex by Sophocles, Oedipus is the tragic hero whose truth is revealed at considerable costs. His plight for truth about what is going on with his kingdom revealed that he has been the cause for the vast majority of the suffering. Upon learning about Oedipus’ actions, several different situations occur. These situations exemplify the fact that truth’s helpfulness is subjective to the person who is facing the truth....   [tags: ancient Greek tragedies] 671 words
(1.9 pages)
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Hamartia in Oedipus the King - Hamartia in Oedipus the King According to Aristotle, the tragic hero is impeded by a distinguishable characteristic or character trait which leads to his ultimate demise. This trait is known as hamartia, or the "tragic flaw." This characteristic is said to not only lead to the hero's demise but may also enable the reader to sympathize with the character. So it follows that in Oedipus the King, a Greek tragedy, the tragic hero Oedipus should have some sort of flaw. However, after close examination of the text, no distinguishable "flaw" is revealed....   [tags: Greek Tragedy Tragedies Oedipus Essays] 974 words
(2.8 pages)
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Greek History: The Dark Ages - Over sixty percent of the English words have originated from the Greek language. Many of these words came into the English language through the poetry and theater plays done in ancient Greece. The Greek plays have been shaped by historical events and their tragic past and put into one story. The ancient Greek theater demonstrated historical events and poems in the form of plays like in The Cyclops and performed them for the audience’s entertainment and awareness. Greek history has shown many tragic events over the course of time....   [tags: greek language, mycenaeans] 1208 words
(3.5 pages)
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Sophocles' Great Tragedies: Oedipus and Antigone - Sophocles, one the most famous ancient Greek playwrights, composed two Greek tragedies that have survived to today. Oedipus the King and Antigone are Sophocles’ most well-known dramas. These two plays emphasize the catastrophic events that take place following a series of incidents and decisions. Throughout the two plays the audience is continuously uncovering details that will eventually lead to the downfall of the main characters. By comparing the two plays, one can identify similar aspects of the plays that would eventually lead to the characters downfalls....   [tags: intentions, defiance, fate]
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1391 words
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A History of Tragedies - Where did tragedy originate, and who decided that killing the main characters of a play was best way to communicate his plot. Tragedy was invented by the Greeks long ago. In the fourth year of the sixty-third Olympiad, or 525 B.C., the first great tragic playwright was born (“Aeschylus”). The playwright's name was Aeschylus, son of Euphorion ("Aeschylus"), and he wrote about ninety plays, though the number is uncertain, seven of which have withstood the tests of time (Kopff). His works have been incredible to the point that he earned the title "Father of Tragedy" (Kopff)....   [tags: Aeschylus, death of the main character]
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1628 words
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The Tragedies of War - Regardless of how advanced society may become the savage and primordial ways of war always generates the same tragedies. There have been many ways that people have tried to bring this issue to the attention of the public. They used things such as the media, stories and films to show the brutality of war. Wolfgang Petersen used his power as a director to illustrate his disapproval for war. Although upfront the film may seem like it is purely for entertainment, if one were to take a closer look it really exhibits the cruelty of war and not just of the Trojan war but of all wars....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
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875 words
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The Role and Structure of Greek Tragedy in Philip Roth’s Eli the Fanatic - The Role and Structure of Greek Tragedy in Philip Roth’s Eli the Fanatic When one’s in pain—physical, mental, or emotional—one always believes it is worse than everyone else’s. Yet when an acquaintance bemoans a bad day, one still manages to wave it off: it could not be worse than one’s own pain. Even if it is a past pain and there are only scars, those scars are tenderer than the friend’s current sores. Individuals forget that anguish can be shared and another’s intervention can diminish it....   [tags: Greek tragedy]
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1665 words
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Description of Humanism Greek Culture - During the Hellenic Age which is sometimes known as the classical period for the Greeks and is dated c.500-300 B.C. In this time period the Greek culture flourish philosophy developed, sculpturing became more sophisticated, and the greatest of them all was the birth of humanism. Humanism is described as being “any system or mode of thought or action in which human interests, values, and dignity predominate” (“Humanism n.pag.). Humanism meant making men superior over all things and that men were supreme even over the Gods....   [tags: greek culture, hellenic age, humanism]
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671 words
(1.9 pages)
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Ancient Greek Drama: A Comparison of the Euripides and Sophocles - Theater was an important part of Ancient Greek Civilization. History of Greek theatre began with religious festivals which aim to honor Dionysus, a god. During the festivals some citizens sing songs and perform improvisation plays and other participants of festivals judges this performances to decide which one of them was the best. These plays form the foundation of the Greek Theatre. Because of the competition between performers to create best performances, plays gained an aesthetic perspective and became a form of art....   [tags: history of Greek theater]
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952 words
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Greek Pride in the Individual - Greek Pride in the Individual The culture of ancient Greece reflects the importance of the individual in society in many different ways. The Greeks used art, philosophy, and even their system of government to convey their beliefs in the importance of one single man in a society. Greek artists showed value for the individual. All people were portrayed in Greek art, from the sagging old woman to the ideal athlete. Although early Greek art focused on the human ideal, their later art shows that the Greeks appreciated all forms, and found the human body in general to be a beautiful thing....   [tags: Ancient Greece Greek History] 771 words
(2.2 pages)
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The Era of Greek Tragedy - The Era of Greek Tragedy In Athens, during the final thirty years of sixth century B.C. playwrights began creating the earliest drama in all of Europe, Greek tragedy (Sifakis, “Greek Tragedy”). Though now the products of the movement are seen as pieces of literature to be read, they originated as theatrical pieces meant to be performed on the stage. The tragedies were mostly derived from stories about their gods, such as Hades, Zeus and Nyx. In that time period, tales of these immortals were passed down from generation to generation as history, not fairy tales....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
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2502 words
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The Archaic and Classical Greek Periods - ... These memories are often distinctly political in nature. The Archaic Period The Greek Archaic Period, (c. 800- 479 BCE) is preceded by the Greek Dark Age, (c.1200- 800 BCE), followed by the Classical Period (c. 510- 323 BCE), (Lloyd, 2012). One of the most important aspects to note with regards to the Archaic Period is the politics and law. These were some of the vast changes experienced during this period and mainly occurred due to the increase of the Greek population, (the sharp rise in population at the start of the Archaic period brought with it the settlement of new towns and the expansion of the older population centers) and trade, which led to colonization and an age of new intell...   [tags: heros and heoric cult]
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1295 words
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The Orgins of Greek Theatre - There is no denying the fact that theatre is truly a link between all civilizations it comes in many forms spiritual rituals, storytelling, hymns, odes, and performances. It has been utilized during the many downfalls of civilizations as a means of communication and was truly shaped by the Greeks. The origins of theatre can be traced back to the Greeks as a religious ritual to their gods, to their implementations of the technical aspects of theatre, through their plays and also through the actual stages that they constructed....   [tags: stages, society, religous, gods] 2381 words
(6.8 pages)
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Women in Greek Stories: The Odyssey by Homer - ... In Euripides’ “Medea,” the character Medea serves as heroine, antagonist, and victim. Medea was married to the famous Greek hero, Jason, whom she left her homeland to live with. After bearing two children, Jason betrayed his vows to Medea, and married the princess of Corinth. In her grief, Medea plots to torture Jason and cause him as much pain as possible, even killing her own children to hurt him. The events that take place before the play serve to establish Medea as a heroine and victim. Medea is a hero when she kills her evil family to escape to Greece with Jason....   [tags: penelope, ancient greece]
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714 words
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Ancient Greek Culture - Let’s take you back, way back, back into time, back to Early Greece. There are a lot of things that set early Greece apart from all the other chapters in the book. First off, I am a musically inclined girl who has grown up around music all of my life. I guess that is one reason why I have chosen the field that I am studying right now. I feel that it was always interesting to learn about Ancient Greece and its culture in music and poems. Not only does it set music apart, but it also tells an interesting tale with its art, literature, architecture, important people, and historical significance or relevance....   [tags: music, philosophy, humanities]
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2688 words
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Summary of the Greek Play Agamemnon by Aeschylus - Agamemnon by Aeschylus is an ancient Greek tragedy set in Argos. It begins with the homecoming of Agamemnon from the war in Troy and his wife’s Clytemnestra desire to kill him. The Herald begins a speech on line 493 on page 121 after returning from Troy. He is addressing the chorus and he reports about Agamemnon’s safe homecoming and tells the chorus what happened in Troy during the ten year duration which they were at war for. Aristotle’s theory of ancient Greek tragedies inspiring of both pity and fear is immensely seen throughout this passage....   [tags: Tragedy, Troy, Plot] 686 words
(2 pages)
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All My Sons Greek Analysis - Arthur Miller—the author of All my Sons, The Crucible, and Death of a Salesman—was born in 1915 in New York City. He lived through the Great Depression and both World Wars. A self-proclaimed modern tragedian, Miller says he looks to the Greeks for inspiration, especially Sophocles (the author of Oedipus the King). Miller elevates “the common man’s failures, his anguish, and his family relationships” to the magnitude of a tragic hero (Galvin). All my Sons is a great example of how Miller uses the six elements described by Aristotle to create modern American tragedies that reflect ancient Greek tragedies like Oedipus the King and Antigone....   [tags: LIterary Analysis ]
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1312 words
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Greek and Elizabethan Teather: Kabuki Theatre - In the history of civilization, there have been many different types of theatre. There is Greek theatre and Elizabethan theater. Some are musicals, some are comedies and some are tragedies. Some types employ realistic techniques while others are more avant-gardes. But one type stands out among the rest, and that is Kabuki theatre. This classical Japanese style of dance and drama is not just theatre. It is a beautiful form of art, which has been carefully crafted over many centuries. Kabuki theatre has a very long and rich history....   [tags: performance, costume, play] 1264 words
(3.6 pages)
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How far do you agree with the view that the tragedies in ‘Ethan Frome’ and ‘A View from the Bridge’ are brought about by individual characters rather - Within A View from the Bridge and Ethan Frome the main protagonists are tragic figures. The origin of a tragedy comes from Greece, where the basis of the idea was a drama in which the protagonist is overcome by some superior force or extreme circumstance; this usually resulted in either disaster or death. As is true to most Greek tragedies the ending of the shown before the downfall itself. Most victims of tragedy were written to be of a high stature such as royalty, yet both Ethan Frome and Eddie Carbone were ordinary men who found themselves in extraordinary circumstances....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
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2096 words
(6 pages)
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Oedipus the King: The Greek Period - Oedipus: The Greek Period Oedipus the King The Greek period, in the fourth and fifth centuries of B.C., evolved from a small city called Athens, Europe. In this era, a sweep of talent and creativity placed a historical advance on theater, that will dominate for years to come. This spirit most likely emerged from the defeat of the Persian Empire, along with the sense of freedom and expression from the Athenian democracy. Four great writers derived from this ancient astonishment. Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides were three writers of tragedy, whereas Aristophanes was a famous comic dramatist....   [tags: Oedipus Rex Essays] 984 words
(2.8 pages)
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Oedipus The King is a Greek Disaster - Oedipus the king by Sophocles is one of the oldest ancient Greek tragedies known to the common world. The play posses all factors that a classic Greek tragedy requires. To further explain, I agree with the fact that "Oedipus the King" by Sophocles is a Greek disaster. This hard to believe, remarkable play has been proven to be a Greek tragedy by Aristotle. In Aristotle’s thoughts, a classical drama must tell the story of a downfall, have unexpected twists of fate, cause pity and fear in the audience, and have a disastrous ending....   [tags: Sophocles] 954 words
(2.7 pages)
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The History of Greek Theater - The History of Greek Theater Theater and drama in Ancient Greece took form in about 5th century BCE, with the Sopocles, the great writer of tragedy. In his plays and those of the same genre, heroes and the ideals of life were depicted and glorified. It was believed that man should live for honor and fame, his action was courageous and glorious and his life would climax in a great and noble death. Originally, the hero’s recognition was created by selfish behaviors and little thought of service to others....   [tags: Art]
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2467 words
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Early Greek Theater vs Elizabethan Era Theater - Antigone and The Tragedy of Julius Caesar are two tragic masterpieces written by playwrights Sophocles and Shakespeare in two completely different time periods, but more importantly, in two completely different cultures. In light of this one must wonder to what degree culture influenced Antigone and The Tragedy of Julius Caesar. These tragedies are just as equally a creation of Greek and Elizabethan culture as they are of Sophocles and Shakespeare. Greek and Elizabethan culture both greatly influenced drama and theater as we know it today, but the two periods were very different....   [tags: Antigone, Julius Caesar, Shakespeare]
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917 words
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The Greek Gods Did Not Think Before They Acted - ... Critic Robert mentions that “the loss of [a] brother is irreparable to [a] sister and her duty towards him is the highest” (422). Although she must remain loyal to the city and her family, Antigone consistently settles to align her morals and desires to venerate her family. Along with her good intentions, Antigone possess moral courage as she follows her heart and full heartedly decides to accept the future consequences. Overall, Antigone’s family nobility and dignified values work to help classify her as a tragic heroine....   [tags: courage, morals, compromise] 1616 words
(4.6 pages)
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Controversy in Greek Tragedy Medea - Controversy in Greek Tragedy Medea The Greek tragedy Medea is a tale of a woman scorn and the wrath that follows. The story is one of outright deceit, crippling revenge and questionable justice. It is typical of Greek tragedies in its simplicity, but atypical in the way it justifies horrific revenge. Medea is one of Euripides' most enduring plays. It and only a handful of others have survived the several thousand years since their conception. Medea is a typical Greek tragedy. The opening monologue sets the stage for the rest of the play, a typical prologue....   [tags: Papers] 571 words
(1.6 pages)
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The Ultimate Greek Tragedy is Sophocles' Opedipus the King - According to Aristotle, Sophocles’ Oedipus the King is the ultimate example of a Greek tragedy. In his work, Poetics, he states numerous reasons of what makes a story a tragedy. Oedipus the King embodies all of the qualities that make a story a tragedy. Oedipus the King does not only cause catharsis, but Oedipus is a hero who has a tragic flaw which, in turn, leads to his demise. By having the predictions made by the oracles come true; it led to the downfall of Oedipus. The oracles coming true created catharsis in the audience by causing them to have pity and fear for the fallen king....   [tags: pity, flaw, prophecy] 731 words
(2.1 pages)
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The Origins of Greek Theatre - Theater was born in Attica, an Ionic region of Greece. It originated from the ceremonial orgies of Dionysos but soon enough its fields of interest spread to various myths along with historic facts. As ancient drama was an institution of Democracy, the great tragic poets Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides as well as the comedian Aristophanes elevated public debate and political criticism to a level of aesthetic achievement. Euripides and the ethologist Menandros, in the thriving years of Alexandria and later on during the Roman domination, reached a beau ideal level and through the Romans managed to form Western Theater, from Renascence and thereafter.DRAMA FESTIVALSThe plays were presented at f...   [tags: essays research papers] 2310 words
(6.6 pages)
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Greek Tragedy - Greek Tragedy The tragedy was a large part of people's lives in ancient Greece. Tragedies became prominent long before Christ was born. A tragedy, or goat-song, usually were seen during festivals in ancient Greek times. Tragedies gradually increased in seriousness until they were given utmost importance. Greek tragedies began at a festival in honor of a god, there were three great tragic authors, and all tragedies include a tragic situation. Greek tragedies began at a festival in honor of Dionysius, who was the god of wine....   [tags: essays papers] 396 words
(1.1 pages)
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Similarities Connecting Two Tragedies: The Fundamentals of Human Nature and the Evolvement of Culture - June 8, 2010 The multiple similarities between the two tragedy’s “Oedipus the King” and “Death of a Salesman” surpass the differences and reveal the significance of dramatic tragedy throughout the ages. The creative, innovation of Greek tragedy continues to provide generations with a platform in which they can modify and ultimately provide relevancy to their culture. Upon analysis of these two dramatic tragedies, one can observe the distinct similarities regarding the basics of human nature. This evidence confirms the credibility of the age old saying “the more things change the more they stay the same”....   [tags: Literary Analysis ] 1049 words
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Greek Actors - GREEK DRAMA: the actors The actors in ancient tragedies were hired and paid by the state and assigned to the tragic poets probably by lot. By the middle of the fifth century three actors were required for the performance of a tragedy. In descending order of importance of the roles they assumed they were called protagonist ‘first actor’ (a term also applied in modern literary criticism to the central character of a play), Dueteragonist ‘second actor’ and tritagonist “third actor’....   [tags: essays research papers] 343 words
(1 pages)
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Greek Theater - Ancient Greek Theater is the first historical record of “drama,” which is the Greek term meaning “to do” or “to act.” Beginning in the 5th century BC, Greek Theater developed into an art that is still used today. During the golden age of the Athenians plays were created, plays that are considered among the greatest works of world drama. Today there are thousands of well-known plays and films based on the re-make of ancient drama. Theater originated from the religious rites of ancient Greek tribes....   [tags: essays research papers] 1166 words
(3.3 pages)
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Oedipus the King: A Greek Tragic Hero - The philosopher Aristotle was a highly intellectual man who loved to reason. One of his ideas was his structured analysis of the “tragic hero” of Greek drama. In his work, Poetics, he defines a tragic hero as “...The man who on the one hand is not pre-eminent in virtue and justice, and yet on the other hand does not fall into misfortune through vice or depravity, but falls because of some mistake; one among the number of the highly renowned and prosperous.” Aristotle’s definition of a tragic hero is clearly shown by the main character in the Greek tragedy Oedipus the King by Sophocles....   [tags: Oedipus Rex, Sophocles] 522 words
(1.5 pages)
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Oedipus the King: A Greek Tragic Hero - Many Greek tragedies include a central character known as "the tragic hero." In the play, Oedipus the King, by Sophocles, the character Oedipus, portrays to the reader the necessary, central, tragic hero. According to Aristotle, "a tragic hero has a supreme pride" (Jones. Pg. 133). That pride is a reflection of arrogance and conceit that suggests superiority to man and equality with the gods. Students of religion are often taught that "pride Goethe before the fall." In Oedipus' situation, his pride, coupled with religious fervor and other human emotions like guilt, lead to what can only be described as a downfall of enormous and costly proportions, in other words, his fate....   [tags: Oedipus Rex Essays]
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1099 words
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"Othello" and Its Connection to Greek Tragedy - The play Othello is Shakespeare's own version of a classic Greek tragedy. A classical dramatic tragedy derives its essence from the ancient Greek plays that were often popular in Athens. These plays would typically consist of the downfall of a famous Greek character in history/legend, or the breakdown of a hero. Typically the hero is forced to struggle against overwhelming odds, and fate only that this characters downfall would be so imposing that regardless of these forces of nature and fate that destroy him, that he would rise and regain glory due to his moral victory....   [tags: European Literature] 559 words
(1.6 pages)
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Comparing the Tragedies of Hamlet, Oedipus the King, and Death of a Salesman - Comparing the Tragedies of Hamlet, Oedipus the King, and Death of a Salesman The tragedies Hamlet, Oedipus the King, and Death of a Salesman have strikingly different plots and characters; however, each play shares common elements in its resolution. The events in the plays’ closings derive from a tragic flaw possessed by the protagonist in each play. The downfall of each protagonist is caused by his inability to effectively cope with his tragic flaw. The various similarities in the closing of each play include elements of the plot, the reflection of other characters on the misfortune of the tragic hero, and expression of important themes through the dialogue of the characters....   [tags: compare contrast compare/contrast] 1033 words
(3 pages)
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Greek Tragedy Exemplified in Shakespeare's Hamlet - Greek Tragedy Exemplified in Shakespeare's Hamlet For several thousands of years, drama has existed among mankind. The ancient Greeks are accredited with the creation of drama, which began as simple religious rituals and eventually evolved into the more complex forms of tragedies and comedies. The first rules of drama, not surprisingly, were also written by a Greek--the famous philosopher and intellectual, Aristotle. Aristotle took note of the what qualities created a successful dramatic piece by observing a plethora of plays written by different Greek dramatists....   [tags: Shakespeare Hamlet Essays] 1178 words
(3.4 pages)
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Ancient Greek Theatre and Drama - Ancient Greece, the birthplace of theatre, continues to greatly influence theatre today. Drama is a form of poetry, because dialogue was spoken or sung in verses. Many Greek plays are still relevant today. Some plays survived on their merits, while others were preserved from academic interest or by accident (Peter Arnott). The Great Dionysia was an important yearly religious celebration and festival, honoring Dionysus, the Greek god of wine and fertility. The Great Dionysia is where theatre first began....   [tags: genres, great dionysia, ] 1632 words
(4.7 pages)
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Dionysus- The Ancient Greek God - Dionysus - the ancient Greek god of wine, merry making, and madness. Dionysus is included in some lists of the twelve Olympians of Ancient Greek religion. Dionysus was the last god to be accepted into Mt. Olympus. He was the also youngest Olympian, and the only one to have a mortal mother. The Dionysia was a large festival held in ancient Athens in honor of Dionysus. During the festival, numerous theatrical performances of dramatic tragedies and comedies were preformed while people would eat and drink, especially wine....   [tags: God of wine, merry making, maddness]
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1041 words
(3 pages)
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Greek and Elizabethan Theatre - William Shakespeare, Christopher Marlowe, and Ben Johnson are names that have resonated through the centuries. Not since ancient Athens has there been such gluttony of talent, producing stories for the ages. Might Athens be were these Englishmen found their inspiration. Greece produced its share of legendary playwrights; Sophocles and Euripides are two of the most famous. There are far m Elizabethan England gave birth to some of the most famous names in theatre. ore similarities between Elizabethan and Greek Theatre then there are differences....   [tags: Compare and Contrast, Analysis] 912 words
(2.6 pages)
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Greek Theater and Tragedy - Many ancient civilizations witnessed Greek theater and tragedy as the world’s first theatrical performances. Tragedy comes from the Greek word Tragos and Ole meaning goat song. The dithyramb, a song and dance performed in honor of the god Dionysus, was performed at a ceremony in Athens; it told the story of Dionysus’s life and his many adventures. Throughout the years the playwrights added things other than Dionysus’s life to the performance. They added other gods and some hero’s that made a name for themselves within the temple....   [tags: History: Ancient Greece, Drama]
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An Emblematic Greek Tragedy - Greek mythology and performances are often based off the evidence of calamitous and catastrophic epics, usually called tragedies. An archetypal tragedy is a disastrous play that directly follows the phases of a typical tragedy, and induces a plot revolving around one specific event aimed at one or more protagonists. An archetypal tragedy includes a protagonist that experiences a completion of an ideal, fatal faults, and ardor realizations and intuitions. In Oedipus, an epic written by Sophocles, Oedipus becomes known as the protagonist with harmful circumstances perspiring around his fate....   [tags: Oedipus, Sophocles, Fatal Flaw]
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Tragedy In Genesis - Tragedy In Genesis People tend to view tragedy in cataclysmic and catastrophic terms. Every night on the news we hear murders, assassinations and bombings referred to as Atragedies.@ Tragedy need not be an event which affects the community at large. Rather, any event which teaches an important lesson to a specific person or a group of people can be viewed as a type of tragedy. While the Greek tragedies focused upon the catastrophic nature of tragedy, The Biblical Book of Genesis provides the reader with another tragic paradigm....   [tags: Genesis Tragedies Tragedy Essays] 4978 words
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Analysis of Greek Tragedy Using the Aristotilean Model - Greek tragedies, written in ancient times, are still a standard for tragedies written today. Contrary to diminishing in value over time, these tragedies have become cherished pieces of work in the sophisticated literate culture of today. However, one can not delve into these precious works of beautiful literary verse without first having background knowledge of the context they were written, and of the structure they follow. There are several terms, as well as an analysis of tragedies by Aristotle, a philosopher who experienced them firsthand....   [tags: World Literature] 1109 words
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The Chi Omega Greek Theater and The Theater of Dionysus - The Chi Omega Greek Theater and The Theater of Dionysus The Chi Omega Greek Theater was constructed as a gift to the University commemorating Chi Omega's founding in 1895. It is the only United States structure of its kind and it was designed to be almost a replica of the theater of Dionysus at the Acropolis. The theater is used on the campus today for plays, pep rallies, and meetings. It is accessible to students, faculty, members of the community and acts as a constant reminder of the Greek System's support of the school....   [tags: Architecture Compare contrast Essays]
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Ancient Greek Theater - ... It is interesting to note that dithyrambs were alternatively called “goat-song,” and the word tragedy is derived from the Greek tragos, meaning “goat,” and odi, meaning “song” (Nardo 14). In his work Poetics, the Greek philosopher Aristotle notes, “[Tragedy] certainly began in improvisations… originating with the authors of the dithyramb… And its advance after that was little by little, improving on whatever they had before them at each stage” (Nardo 14). Over the years, the dithyramb grew in elaborateness, eventually reenacting myths from older works of epic poetry, such as Homer’s Odyssey or Iliad (Nardo 14)....   [tags: Sophocles, Golden Age, Oedipus] 1223 words
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Ancient Greek: The Birthplace of Western Civilization - ... Both the US and the Athenian government had the Legislative limb, the Executive extension, and the legal limb. The Legislative extension passes the laws, the Executive limb completes the laws, and the legal extensions had trials with paid members of the jury. In the US, a large portion of the just speculations that the administration utilization are either indistinguishable or fundamentally the same to the Ancient Athenians hypotheses. In reasoning old Greek kept tabs on the part of reason and request....   [tags: philosophy, fine art, socrates] 757 words
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Comparing Othello and Oedipus the King - Oedipus the King and Othello are both plays in which are known for their dramatic tragedies. Oedipus the King is an Athenian tragedy by Sophocles that was first performed in 429 BC. The Tragedy of Othello, the Moor of Venice is a tragedy by William Shakespeare, which was written in approximately 1603. These two plays do a profound job at making sure the audience understands the background of the main characters, however, there are minor characters who are just as important. Emilia, Othello’s wife, and Jocasta, Oedipus’s mother and wife, both aid in the understanding of the major characters throughout these plays....   [tags: Shakespeare, Sophocles, tragedies]
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Oedipus the King - Oedipus the King, written by Sophocles, is a tragic drama that portrays a great deal of irony. Oedipus, the protagonist, suffers serious misfortune that is significant in that the “misfortune is logically connected with the hero’s actions” (AbleMedia LLC). When the reader learns about the background of Greek culture and the life of Sophocles, this tragic drama is able to become more alive and valuable. It is important to familiarize oneself with the author because it allows for a greater connection to the dialogue presented....   [tags: Greek Literature]
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The Greek Chorus - The Greek Chorus *No Works Cited Greek tragedy and comedy originated with the chorus, the most important part of the performance space was the orchestra, which means 'a place for dancing' (orchesis). A typical tragic Greek chorus was a group of some twelve to fifteen masked men just about to enter military service after some years of training (Athenians were taught to sing and dance from a very early age.) An old comedic chorus consisted of up to twenty four men. The effort of dancing and singing through three tragedies and a satyr play was likened to that of competing in the Olympic Games....   [tags: Papers] 361 words
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Dramatic Tragedies: Oedipus Rex and Hamlet - William Shakespeare and Sophocles were both intellectual playwrights for their time. Shakespeare is considered to be one of the most advanced writers of his time. They both created plays similar in nature such as; “Oedipus Rex” and “Hamlet”. Both plays were consistent of dramatic tragedy. Sophocles wrote about the typical Greek tragedy that consisted of an ill-fated doom for Oedipus. Shakespeare wrote about Kingdom of Denmark where all things fell apart and death was imminent. Each story consisted of a queen that was important to the outcome of each play....   [tags: Shakespeare, Sophocles, tragedy] 713 words
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Oedipus: The Reign of a Tragic Hero - The time period of Greek theater’s popularity was a very influential time in our world’s history. Without knowing what Greek theater was all about, how can someone expect to truly understand a tragic play and the history it comes with. The history behind the character of Oedipus, in the play Oedipus the King, is very complicated. His intricate past dealing with prophecies, family members, and murder is the main focus of the story. There are many characteristics that complete Aristotle’s definition of a tragic hero; these being the presence of hamartia and peripeteia, a sense of self-awareness, the audience’s pity for the character, and the hero is of noble birth....   [tags: greek theater, noble birth, greek mythology]
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Oedipus as a Tragic Hero in Sophocles’ Oedipus the King - The tragic hero has served as the foundation of Greek tragedy since its inception in ancient times. He or she serves as a rallying point for the audience to cheer for and mourn with throughout the story, and ultimately teaches the audience a lesson about human vulnerability and strength through defeat. A tragic hero is “a privileged, exalted character of high repute, who, by virtue of a tragic flaw and fate, suffers a fall from glory into suffering” (DiYanni). The combination of the tragic hero’s character traits and the storyline he or she follows make the tragedy an actual tragedy rather than a depressing story with a sad ending....   [tags: god, hero, greek theories]
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Ancient Greek Theatre Architecture - We all look for our beginnings. Whether we look for them in our personal life or in our professional life, we still look for them. As I was looking around the theatre recently, I was looking at and wondering where the idea of the theatre came from. Rather, who built it and why it is built the way it is. Who made the first one. Where do the roots of the theatre lay. All very good questions that I hope will be answered. In the beginning of time, man did not understand the complex workings of the universe....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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Creon's Pride - Throughout Greek literature, the blind prophet Tiresias makes several appearances. In Sophocles’ plays Oedipus the King and Antigone, Tiresias tries in vain to warn the kings of Thebes of their wrong doing. In Antigone, Creon, the king of Thebes, refuses to reason with Tiresias after sentencing his niece Antigone to death for burying her brother. Throughout the text Tiresias and the Chorus to help Creon see the errors he has made, but he is blinded by his stubbornness. When Tiresias arrives in Thebes to speak to Creon it at first appears that Creon will obey the advice the prophet has to offer....   [tags: Greek Literature]
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Greek Theater in 5th Century BCE - Greek Theatre in 5th Century BCE The Ancient Greeks, probably one of the most fascinating civilizations to study contributed several discoveries and technological advancements. One can not discuss the Greeks without discussing Greek Theatre though. Greek Theater paved the way for literature and art in later history in many ways. If it wasn’t for Greek Theatre famous play writers like Shakespeare would have never done what they are so very well known for. When studying Greek Theatre it is virtually impossible not to hear about it in the 5th Century BCE, and that is because the 5th Century BCE was rather exciting when it came to Greek Theatre....   [tags: essays research papers] 974 words
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Ancient Greek Theatre - The Greek theatre tradition of the time was rooted in the spirituality of its people, developed with the help and instruction from the politicians of the day and analysed by the philosophical contingent of the age. To discover how the theatre tradition of the fifth century was influenced by the spiritual, philosophical and political mindset of its time, one must first look at how the theatre of this age was first developed. The Greek theatre tradition was born at a theatre built beneath the Acropolis in Athens, at an annual religious festival at which a large chorus of men would dance, play instruments and sing odes to the God of the festival, Dionysus....   [tags: European Literature] 1194 words
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Clytemnestra and Aphrodite - Clytemnestra is one of Greek literature’s most famous villains while Aphrodite is seen as one of the most desirable women in literature. Greek Goddesses are celebrated for their manlike traits where as human females are thought to be undesirable for them. This relationship further proves that gods and goddesses are superior not only in power but also in social status. By comparing Aechylus’ Agamemnon with The Homeric Hymn to Aphrodite we can see how in ancient Greece, literature taught women to be inferior by showing them consequences of female actions to keep women in their subordinate positions in society....   [tags: greek goddesses, the agamemnon]
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Pathetic vs Ethical - Aristotle’s Poetics is a “reservoir of the themes and schemes deployed in ancient Greek tragedy and poetry” (Poetics iii). Written around 330 B.C., it was the first work of literature to make a distinction amongst the various literary genres and provide a proper analysis of them. In Poetics, Aristotle places a big emphasis on the genre of tragedy. When one hears of the word tragedy, one already assumes that something bad has occurred to an individual and an immediate emotion of sorrow occurs, but how does Aristotle see tragedy....   [tags: Philosophy, Greek, Aristotle] 2004 words
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The Heroes of the Trojan War: Hector & Achilles - In the Greek epic, The Iliad, Homer describes the siege and capture of the ancient city of Troy by Achilles and the Achaean warriors. Achilles, being a fearless fighter, defeated many throughout his battles against the Trojan army, including the brave-hearted Hector during the invasion of Troy. Though Achilles has been given the title of the hero of the Trojan War, many historians believe that Hector was a greater hero than Achilles. When comparing the characteristics of an epic hero such as being a national hero and having supernatural abilities, Hector clearly surpasses Achilles....   [tags: Greek Literature] 532 words
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Oedipus Rex - Most Renowned Tragedy of All Time - Oedipus Rex is one of the most renowned tragedies of all time in part because of its direct paradoxes but mostly due to it’s touching of several major themes. In this play, Sophocles chooses Oedipus as the hero (if he is to be called that) and manages to convey many of broad perspectives of Ancient Greek life. Oedipus deals with the oracle in many contrasting ways, which lead to this specific unfolding of events, which we will discover is not in his hands. The protagonist of the play Oedipus is the son of king Laius and Queen Jocasta of Thebes....   [tags: Greek Literature] 530 words
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tragoed Oedipus the King (Oedipus Rex) and Greek Tragedy - Oedipus Rex as a Great Greek Tragedy     The reader is told in Aristotle's Poetics that tragedy "arouses the emotions of pity and fear, wonder and awe" (The Poetics 10). To Aristotle, the best type of tragedy involves reversal of a situation, recognition from a character, and suffering. The plot has to be complex, and a normal person should fall from prosperity to misfortune due to some type of mistake. Oedipus Rex, by Sophocles, is a great example of a Greek tragedy. Its main plot is Oedipus' goal to find out his true identity, the result being his downfall by finding out he has married his own mother and killed his father....   [tags: Oedipus the King Oedipus Rex]
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Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman as Classic Greek Tragedy - Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman as Classic Greek Tragedy Miller’s Death of a Salesman is an interesting and complex play set at a time of great change in America. Some people believe that it is one of a few classic tragedies written in modern time. While on the surface this play and characters don't appear to hold the definition of tragedy that Aristotle described. In a modern context I believe it may be very close to fitting that mold. Willy is a person that has always been a dreamer. Willy is very proud and self reliant in his approach to life....   [tags: Death Salesman essays] 1170 words
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Antigone's Character - Steeped in family drama, death, politics, and religion, Sophocles’ Antigone is a complex tragedy to say the least. The basic plot of the tragedy is the conflict between Antigone’s family principles and religious tradition and Creon’s embodiment of state and its authority (Scodel). It is on of three tragedies written by Sophocles that chronicle the life of Oedipus. It was written before Oedipus the King, but is a culmination of the events that occurred after Oedipus’ death (Norton 610). Antigone’s brothers, Eteocles and Polynices had battled over the throne of Thebes, resulting in the death of both (Lawall)....   [tags: Greek tragedy, Sophocles]
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Aristotle's Poetics: Catharsis and Rasas - There are distinct differences between the theories outlined within Aristotle’s Poetics and Bharata’s The Nāṭyaśāstra which both attempt to elaborate upon the audience relationship and the phenomenon produced relating to the theatrical experience. However, despite the dissimilarities there are components of catharsis and rasa that share common elements and ideas surrounding the creation and the effects of these experiences. Aristotle contends the cathartic nature of tragedy aids in purgation of emotion, however ultimately limiting it to the powers of tragedy as only creating this, where, contrarily, The Nāṭyaśāstra outlines the power any actor has in creating bhāva, leading to rasa....   [tags: auciende, relationship, ancient greek]
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Knowledge and Skills During The Renaissance - The Renaissance was more an era of literature and poetry than of the visual arts. The artistic creation was inspired by Greek mythologies and philosophies. Most intellectuals embraced the concept of humanism, which stressed the importance of human dignity and emphasis off of theology and logic, to human studies. Dr. Cheney states, “The universal man contained within himself knowledge and all the skills of the various arts, from grammar, rhetoric, and philosophy, to art, music, poetry, and architecture....   [tags: literature, visual arts, greek] 523 words
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Oedipus the King by Sophocles - Oedipus the King, a tragedy which was written by the ancient greek dramatist Sophocles, is often referred to as the perfect tragedy (McManus, 1999). According to Aristotle in his Poetics, in order for a story to be considered a tragedy, it must be realistic, evoke a series of emotions leading to catharsis, which is defined by the Oxford English Dictionary as “the process of releasing, and thereby providing relief from, strong or repressed emotions”. A tragedy should also contain six key elements: Plot, Character, Thought, Diction, Melody, and Spectacle (McManus, 1999)....   [tags: perfect tragedy, aristotle, greek]
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Aristophanes's The Clouds - Aside from all the prodigious number of Greek tragedies in history, stands a collection of Greek comedies which serve as humorous relief from the powerful overtone of the tragedy. These comedies were meant to ease the severity and seriousness sometimes associated with the Greek society. The ideas portrayed in the comedies, compared to the tragedies, were ridiculously far-fetched; however, although abnormal, these views are certainly worthy of attention. Throughout his comedy, The Clouds, Aristophanes, along with his frequent use of toilet humor, ridicules aspects of Greek culture when he destroys tradition by denouncing the importance of the gods' influence on the actions of mortals, and he...   [tags: Greek Plays Aristophanes Clouds Essays] 1639 words
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Medea: A Loving Mother - The Greek playwright, Euripides, is considered one of the three great tragedians of classical Athens. His individuality is attributed to the way he “pushes to the limits of what an audience can stand” . His masterpiece Medea , a fascinating classic centered on the Greek goddess Medea, is a prime example of his eccentricity. This piece was unpopular during the time of its release since it defied the commons themes of tragedies during the 430s B.C.E.; it, instead, introduced a nihilistic and disturbing drama focused on women, slaves and persons from the lower class....   [tags: greek playwright, Euripides, tragedians]
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Oedipus the King - Oedipus the King The ancient Greeks were famous for their tragedies. These dramas functioned to “ask questions about the nature of man, his position in the universe, and the powers that govern his life” (“Greek” 1). Brereton (1968) stated that tragedies typically “involved a final and impressive disaster due to an unforeseen or unrealized failure involving people who command respect and sympathy. It often entails an ironical change of fortune and usually conveys a strong impression of waste....   [tags: Greek Tragedy Oedipus King Essays]
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The Act of Sacrifice from Achilles and Gilgamesh - The Act of Sacrifice from Achilles and Gilgamesh The act of sacrifice is a very important event in literature. Often, it can define and shape a character’s life and personality. The ancient texts discussed in class contain many diverse, yet equally meaningful examples of sacrifice. Even though these acts of sacrifice can occur for different reasons, each one has a similar purpose. The characters that perform such sacrifices are required to give up something they love, cherish or own in order to serve a greater purpose....   [tags: The Iliad Greek Literature Essays] 1370 words
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Oedipus the King: A Greek Tragic Hero - Oedipus is a play written by Sophocles that many have heard. Few, however, would not be surprised to discover what Oedipus has discovered at the end of the play, that our tragic hero has killed his own father only to marry his mother. Many ask how this play could be a tragedy. What is the definition of tragedy. Aristotle's 'The Poetics', is a work in which he tried to define what tragedy was. Aristotle decided that the hero, or at least the main character in a tragedy must be centrally good, but must bring about himself his demise, due to a fatal flaw, known as 'hamartia'....   [tags: Oedipus Rex, Sophocles] 731 words
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