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The First Amendment - The First Amendment "I'll need to see that before it goes to press." Almost every journalism student in America hears these ten inevitable words before the distribution of their school's newspapers. Recently, student journalists have been heavily censored due to the 1988 Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier Supreme Court decision. One of the major consequences of this decision was that since the Supreme Court felt that the First Amendment, stating that, "Congress shall make no law…abridging the freedom of speech or of the press," (Amendment I, A6), was no longer sufficient to protect student journalists, the states would have to figure out a solution themselves (Foerstel 217)....   [tags: Papers] 447 words
(1.3 pages)
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The First Amendment - In America the Amendment 1 of the U.S. Constitution gives the American people the right to peaceably assemble and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. Most notably Amendment 1 is known for and most often cited as giving the Freedom of Speech. Even before this amendment was ratified people in the U.S. were protesting, as in the Boston Tea Party. Protesting has been a way to effect change in America. A question to ask is this: is there a right way or wrong way to protest. Others protest that has had an effect on America since the Amendment was ratified are protest against war such as Vietnam and Desert Shield/Desert Storm, Civil Rights Movement, and more recently the prot...   [tags: Freedom of Speech]
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630 words
(1.8 pages)
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The First Amendment: Free Of Expression - The First Amendment: Free of Expression In 1787 our forefathers ratified the constitution of the United States of America, which contains the most important document to any American citizen, the Bill of Rights. The first amendment of the Bill of Rights states: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the establishment thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech; or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances....   [tags: essays research papers] 1131 words
(3.2 pages)
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Limitations to Free Speech in the First Amendment - To many the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution guarantees the right to say anything you want at any time you want, and not be arrested, but the first amendment does not protect all speech. What do I mean by this. Over the years the Supreme Court has rejected an interpretation of the First Amendment that gives the right to free speech without limits. For example speech that impedes national security, justice, and personal safety is not protected by the First Amendment. If you know of limits you would probably think first of speech that presents a danger to other people or speech that is false or makes true statement misleading (otherwise known as Libel and Slander)....   [tags: advertising, law, supreme court] 584 words
(1.7 pages)
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The First Amendment and Conservative Rulings of the Supreme Court - The First Amendment and Conservative Rulings of the Supreme Court The authors of the Constitution of the United States created a magnificent list of liberties which were, at the time ascribed, to most people belonging to the United States. The main author, James Madison, transported the previous ideas of fundamental liberties from the great libertarians around the world, such as John Lilburne, John Locke, William Walwyn and John Milton. Madison and other previous libertarians of his time were transposed into seventeen different rights which were to be secured to all those in the United States....   [tags: Politics Political Essays] 812 words
(2.3 pages)
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Is Flag Burning protected under the First Amendment? - Is Flag Burning protected under the First Amendment. There is a proposed amendment to make flag burning illegal. Congress tried to pass the Flag Protection Act of 1989, but the act failed because it is seen as a form of public protection. There have been other attempts to pass legislation to protect the American flag but all of the attempts have failed so far. Flag burning is very controversial because people have different definitions of what “freedom of speech” means and what our flag stands for....   [tags: Persuasive, Exemplification Essay] 1567 words
(4.5 pages)
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The Infringement Of The First Amendment In High School Theatre - In the landmark case Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District (1969), John Tinker and his siblings decided to openly protest the Vietnam War by wearing black armbands to school (Goldman 1). The school felt that their efforts to protest the war disrupted the school environment. “The Supreme Court said that ‘in our system, undifferentiated fear or apprehension of disturbance is not enough to overcome the right to freedom of expression.’ School officials cannot silence student speech simply because they dislike it or it is controversial or unpopular” (FAQs 2)....   [tags: Freedom of Speech] 1271 words
(3.6 pages)
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Should There Be Restrictions to Freedom of Speech - Should there be restrictions to freedom of speech synonyms, and is there a scarcity of freedom that is given to individuals. Freedom to the people has been Americas greatest accomplishment, yet the checks and balances placed between the lines of freedom are not defined. Obscenity speeches are defined as outside the boundaries of the First Amendment protection. Libel and Slander of public figures must be proven by malice; the reckless disregard for the truth. Commercial speeches can be banned by the government as illegal if the information if deceptive to the readers....   [tags: first amendment, slander] 537 words
(1.5 pages)
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US Constitution and Bill of Rights - Questions and Answers - U.S. Constitution 1. Explain prior restraints, defamation, and sedition of the freedom of freedom of speech and freedom of the press Freedom of speech in United states are usually protected by the constitution, the only things that are not protected are cases of obscenity, defamation, war words and any form of incitement to start of riots. The other exceptions to the protection of the bill of rights on freedom of speech are harassment, privileged communications, trade secrets and any classified materials belonging to a business establishment or a company (Lieberman, 1999, p....   [tags: First Amendment, Incorporation]
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776 words
(2.2 pages)
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Illegalization of Flag Burning Violates the First Constitutional Amendment - Illegalization of Flag Burning Violates the First Constitutional Amendment When making flag burning illegal you have to wonder what our lawmakers were thinking. It was clearly not about the First Amendment in which American’s right to free speech is protected. Desecrating a flag is guaranteed in our Bill of Rights, however unpatriotic that may be. It is impossible to draw the line of where desecration begins. What about those that let our sacred symbol touch the ground, a clear violation of respect, do we punish them too....   [tags: Argumentative Persuasive Argument Essays] 412 words
(1.2 pages)
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Persuasive Essay: Gun Control Contradicts the Second Amendment - Gun control has been a hot topic for very long time. People on the anti- gun control side believe that gun ownership is a Constitutional right backed by the Second Amendment. The anti-gun believe that you should be able to posses and own any firearm. They also believe that gun laws only restrict the law abiding citizens. Pro-gun control believe that guns are the backbone to our crime problem. They also believe that gun laws help keep guns of the street and deter crime. The Second Amendment reads," A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed" (Caplan p32)....   [tags: 2nd Amendment Constitution The Right To Bear Arms] 1288 words
(3.7 pages)
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19th amendment - AMENDMENT 19 The amendment that I chose to do my report on is the 19th amendment. This amendment guaranteed the voting right to all of the American woman. The victory of this amendment took decades to be passed. In August of 1995 marked the 75th anniversary of the ratification of this amendment. This amendment was ratified on August 24,1920. The first three states to approve this amendment were Illinois Wisconsin and Michigan. When this amendment was first put out into the society the men and people didn’t know what to think....   [tags: essays research papers] 365 words
(1 pages)
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Fourteenth Amendment to the US Constitution - The Fourteenth Amendment What amendment to the United States constitution is considered to be illegally ratified. What amendment both grants the right to vote to men and then takes away that right to vote. If you answered the fourteenth amendment to both questions you would be right. Although most people think of the fourteenth amendment as being a "civil rights" amendment, it also defines citizenship, voting rights, and states congressional representatives and electors numbers. In this paper I will talk about how the passage of the fourteenth amendment was a relevant event in history, how it impacts our country today, how it is viewed as the civil rights amendment in our textbook, how it h...   [tags: Political Science] 1434 words
(4.1 pages)
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The 18th Amendment - The Eighteenth Amendment, or better known as the Prohibition Amendment, was the change to the Constitution that made the, "manufacture, sale, or transportation of intoxicating liquors within, the importation thereof into, or the exportation thereof from the United States and all territory subject to the jurisdiction thereof for beverage purpose is hereby prohibited" (209). In other words, associating one's self with anything alcoholic, with the exception of medicinally, was illegal. This seemingly un-American amendment was ratified January 16, 1919....   [tags: Political Science] 1338 words
(3.8 pages)
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8th amendment - I think that executing a minor violates the 8th amendment, “No cruel or unusual punishment.” If a little kid makes a mistake and accidentally shoots a gun or does something that kills someone, and they are executed I think that that falls under cruel and unusual punishment. A court case that made it to the Supreme Court was the case of Kevin Nigel Stanford, who was convicted in 1981 of a murder committed in Kentucky when he was 17 years and 4 months old. Stanford and an accomplice repeatedly raped and sodomized a 20-year-old woman during the robbery of a gas station where she worked....   [tags: essays research papers] 541 words
(1.5 pages)
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The 18th Amendment - To drink or no. Ever since the first people stumbled across alcohol (and then each other) this has been a question commonly asked. Statistics show that a majority of domestic violence, automobile accidents, and rape, all involve (many times) alcohol. Whether one thinks consumption is "right" or not has been asked by people for people from time to time. This would be the case of the 18th Amendment of 1919. The Act passed by those concerned with the above-mentioned problems, prohibited the vending, transportation of, and consumption of alcohol....   [tags: Alcohol] 334 words
(1 pages)
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Informative Essay: Gun Control and the Second Amendment - "If the second amendment does not mean what it says, what about the first?", this was the question asked by author, and National Rifle Association member, Bill Clede. In his article "Gun Control, Press Control", he warns journalists about the hidden dangers associated with gun control. When dealing with the interpretation of the Constitution, there are two views one can take. The Constitution can be viewed as a "living document" or in its "original " understanding. The original understanding, people are guided by what the Framers of the Constitution had in mind when they drafted it....   [tags: Constituton Bill Rights Right To Bear Arms] 920 words
(2.6 pages)
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The Decomposting Process or Soil Amendment - ... The process of composting only takes place under favourable conditions. Five conditions that promote the process of composting are: 1. Introducing worms and micro-organisms: worms and micro-organisms must be introduced into the waste for the process to kick off. 2. Nutrients: The right nutrients in their right quantities must also be present for this process to take place. Waste to be used for the preparation of compost, should be composed of both ‘brown’ and ‘green’ organic materials. ‘Brown’ organic materials are carbon based materials such as dead leaves, manure and etcetera which are rich in carbon....   [tags: organic matter, worms and micro-organisms] 605 words
(1.7 pages)
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The Failure of the First and Second Reconstruction - The Failure of the First and Second Reconstruction The First and Second Reconstructions held out the great promise of rectifying racial injustices in America. The First Reconstruction, emerging out of the chaos of the Civil War had as its goals equality for Blacks in voting, politics, and use of public facilities. The Second Reconstruction emerging out of the booming economy of the 1950's, had as its goals, integration, the end of Jim Crow and the more amorphous goal of making America a biracial democracy where, "the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave holders will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood." Even though both movements, were borne of high hope...   [tags: American History]
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4645 words
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In Opposition of an Amendment to Ban Flag Desecration - In Opposition of an Amendment to Ban Flag Desecration In 1876 a Constitutional amendment was proposed that would eliminate the Senate. In 1893, there was an amendment proposed that would get rid of the Army and the Navy, and another one that would rename the country the United States of the Earth. They all share one common dominator: they would do absolutely nothing to benefit the United States or its citizens. To this list another proposed amendment can be added: the amendment banning desecration of the American flag....   [tags: Argumentative Persuasive Argument Essays] 343 words
(1 pages)
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The Importance of the Freedom of Speech - There is no other government in the world that gives freedom to the people like the United States of America. In the last sixty years, American courts, have made a set of legal doctrines that protect all forms of the freedom of expression. The First Amendment is a great respect toward the freedom of religion. It also prevents the government from "abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances." In the early history of America, protecting freedom has been very important to Americans....   [tags: US Constitution History Amendment] 929 words
(2.7 pages)
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Amendments - Amendments The first Amendment states “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press, or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.” This sets the tone for a great country to be formed. No other country says that their citizens have the same rights as the Constitution proclaims. To take a closer look at the Amendments and why people say that the first one is the most important amendment, this paper will look into the true meaning of the first amendment and the importance to this country....   [tags: Papers] 366 words
(1 pages)
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Against Gun Control in America - Constitutional Law Gun Control Paper Gun control is undoubtedly an issue that most Americans have been exposed to. In 1989, guns killed 11,832 Americans. The National Rifle Association (NRA) members believe that it is their constitutional right to own guns, stating that guns are not the root of the crime problem in the United States. Gun control activists like the members of the Coalition to Stop Gun Violence (CSGV) argue that guns are responsible for the majority of violent crimes that take place....   [tags: Second Amendment The Right To Bear Arms]
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2269 words
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The First Amendment - Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people to assemble peacefully, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. The first and the most significant of the amendments to our Constitution is the First Amendment. "The amendment that established our freedoms as citizens of our new confederation." The First Amendment insures freedom of speech and of the press....   [tags: Constitution US History Government] 1163 words
(3.3 pages)
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The First Amendment - The First Amendment America was built on freedom. Freedom to speak, freedom to choose, freedom to worship, and freedom to do just about anything you want within the law. America’s law was designed to protect and preserve these freedoms. The reason the United States of America came to exist was because the colonists fled Great Britain to get back the freedoms that were taken away from them by the Monarchy. In countries where Monarchies and Dictatorships rule, there is little if any freedom to speak of....   [tags: Bill Rights Constitution Government USA Essays] 552 words
(1.6 pages)
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The Importance of the First Amendment - The Importance of the First Amendment "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of Religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech," this Amendment is the most important part of the constitution. Without free speech, we the people of the United States would not be able to speak openly and freely about issues that affect our everyday life. Had it not been for Katie Stanton and Susan B. Anthony exercising their first amendment right to free speech and peaceful assembly, and the press covering and catching the women's suffrage movement it is possible that women may not have gained the legal right to vote until many years later....   [tags: Papers] 504 words
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The Fisrt Amendment Analysis: Basic Freedom - The interpretation of the first amendment has been seen throughout our history and, it had either been incorporated in a manner of conservancy or alteration. The first amendment basically describes what congress was under limited power to and, our basic freedoms. However, the concern was never questioned if the state government can curb those liberties since during the ratification of the bill there was little concern of this even being true. This had proven to be reality later on with the various cases that questioned not only the first, but several other amendments....   [tags: first amendment, amendments, freedom] 617 words
(1.8 pages)
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Significance of The Free Exercise Clause - The Free Exercise Clause of the First Amendment states “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof”. Meaning, Congress cannot forbid or ban the exercises or beliefs of any religion. However, the government can in fact interfere with religions practices. This means that the government cannot prohibit the beliefs of any religion, but can intervene in certain practices. The origins of the first Amendment date back to when the Constitution and Bill of rights were first being debated and written down....   [tags: First Amendment ] 598 words
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Political Correctness Infringes on our First Amendment Rights - Political Correctness Infringes on our First Amendment Rights Political correctness has become increasingly obvious in our daily lives. For example, the other day I attended the first meeting of the Frisbee Club here on the State University campus. During the meeting, we were discussing the fact we wanted shirts for this year, but we did not know what slogan to use. While in the brainstorming process, the slogan “Suck my disk” came out. At the time, the slogan “suck my disk” seemed to be better than sliced bread to a bunch of college guys....   [tags: Argumentative Persuasive Argument Essays]
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711 words
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Freedom Of Expression - Our First Amendment Rights Are Threatened - What is art. Can it be defined in any single painting, or sculpture. Is it even something that can be seen, or does it have to be experienced. The term "art" is so vague that it can be applied to almost anything, really. Mostly, however, art should be that which frees our imagination. It connects our conscious with our subconscious, putting into a visual form what we feel and think. It allows us to explore our inner self and fill that urge to understand our minds and our universe. Art helps us to see beyond the ordinary, to see what is in our hearts without being blinded by reality....   [tags: essays research papers] 1158 words
(3.3 pages)
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Adult Entertainment and First Ammendment Rights - Adult Entertainment and First Ammendment Rights The essence of the American dream stems from freedom. Before this nation was even called the United States of America, religious separatists ventured across the Atlantic Ocean so that they would be free to practice a religion that was not controlled by the state. Today, we find ourselves in a constant battle with ethics, morals and values in the United States. Seeing that we are a nation that is culturally diverse myriad of cultures and religions has been mixed together and the final outcome is the society that we live in today....   [tags: Papers] 984 words
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We Need a Constitutional Amendment to Protect the American Flag - We Must Fight for the Constitutional Amendment to Protect the American Flag Free speech and the First Amendment rights do not give people lisence to desecrate a symbol of pride and freedom. It is not all right to protect those who let it burn, lighting up the sky with their hatred. It definitely is not acceptable to insult the men and women who fight every day to protect this nation by burning the symbol of their labors. Therefore, it is crucial that the Supreme Court pass the amendment to the Constitution to protect the flag of the US....   [tags: Argumentative Persuasive Argument Essays] 487 words
(1.4 pages)
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The Aims and Principles of the 1834 Poor Law Amendment Act - The Aims and Principles of the 1834 Poor Law Amendment Act In the decades prior to the national reform of the Poor Law in 1834, the characterisations of the administration were of variety rather than uniformity. The social and economic changes at this time produced many problems for those that were responsible for the social welfare. Many areas throughout the country though found solutions to this problem within the legal frame-work of the Elizabethan Poor Law of 1597-1601. In the initial stages the amendment act was set up to reduce the amount of poor rates that were being paid....   [tags: Papers] 673 words
(1.9 pages)
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The American Constitution: The Thirteenth Amendment - The Thirteenth Amendment A constitution is the identity of any country that makes it distinctive from other countries, and it protects its peoples’ rights. The American Constitution, which contains laws and roles, was established and written in 1787. It has twenty-seven approved amendments, and the first ten of them were named: the Bill of Rights. Each one of these twenty-seven amendments was issued for a reason or due to specific situations. Mark Grossman, a professional writer specializing in American and world history, constitutional law, and the environment, said: “Constitutional Amendments is not to be a dry history – it is a comprehensive work that includes how the amendments to...   [tags: american history, people´s right]
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612 words
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Pros and Cons of the Equal Rights Amendment - Pros and Cons of the Equal Rights Amendment The Equal Rights Amendment began its earliest discussions in 1920. These discussions took place immediately after two-thirds of the states approved women's suffrage. The nineteenth century was intertwined with several feminist movements such as abortion, temperance, birth control and equality. Many lobbyists and political education groups formed in these times. One such organization is the Eagle Forum, who claims to lead the pro-family movement. On the opposite side of the coin is The National Organization for Women, or NOW, which takes action to better the position of women in society....   [tags: Suffrage Equality Gender] 1284 words
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14th Amendment -EQUAL PROTECTION UNDER THE LAW - EQUAL PROTECTION UNDER THE LAW In school especially, as well as throughout our daily lives, we learn in America to live by the idea of freedom and equality for all. We do not allow race, class, or creed to determine a person’s stature in the community. It may seem as if this is the standard of society, but these ideas of equality have been fought over since the beginning of written history, and even in America today, prejudice still exists. To address these and similar problems, the founding fathers of this nation created a Constitution which included laws that dealt with individual freedoms....   [tags: essays research papers] 925 words
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First Amendment Rights, Privacy and the Paparazzi - First Amendment Rights, Privacy and the Paparazzi The question of paparazzi threatening privacy and First Amendment rights is often to situational to argue in a conventional manner, but certainly there are many facets of the issue which can be addressed in a quite straightforward manner. Celebrities who feel they have the right to privacy in public places often muddy the waters of this issue. Oddly enough, those celebrities who have chosen to speak out against what they feel are violations of their privacy most always begin their campaigns with a large press conference....   [tags: First Amendment Right to Privacy] 666 words
(1.9 pages)
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The Importance of the First Amendment of the United States’ Bill of Rights for Democratic Government and its Citizens - Being expression one of the most important rights of the people to maintain a connected society right to speech should be accepted to do so. The first amendment is one of the most fundamental rights that individuals have. It is fundamental to the existence of democracy and the respect of human dignity. This amendment describes the principal rights of the citizens of the United States. If the citizens were unable to criticize the government, it would be impossible to regulate order. By looking freedom of speech there is also freedom of assembly and freedom of press that are crucial for the United States democracy. According to the “Derechos, Human Rights”, freedom of speech is one of the most...   [tags: First Amendment, USA, Bill of Rights, Democracy, G] 780 words
(2.2 pages)
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The First Amendment - The First Amendment is the first section of the Bill of Rights and is often considered the most important part of the U.S Constitution because it guarantees the citizens of United States the essential personal freedoms of religion, speech, press, peaceful assembly and the freedom to petition the Government. Thanks to the rights granted by the First Amendment, Americans are able to live in a country where they can freely express themselves, speak their mind, pray without interference, protest in peace and where their opinions are taken into consideration, which is something not many other nationalities have the fortune of saying....   [tags: bill of rights, constitution, Madison]
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886 words
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The First Amendment - The First Amendment The foundation of today's society rests upon the words of our forefathers. The Constitution claims that "the people" shape their own government. Who are "the people"to which this document refers. Americans have long struggled with defining "the people". Blacks, women, and homosexuals all deal with this issue, b ut today youth emerge as a challenged group. Students are often a censored body, thus not enjoying protection under the First Amendment. Schools profess they are protecting the rights of the majority, but in actuality, they are violating the rights of the individual through the denial of their First Amendment rights....   [tags: Papers] 1214 words
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The Freedom Provieded by the First Amendment - Civilizations and empires throughout history had risen and collapsed for just one word. Some like a summer night died young, while others lasted for centuries. The word was repeated consecutively by the greatest men of all times, and their blood was shed in order to fulfill it. Starting or even before William Wallace and until our present time with the raging of the Arab Spring people have been demanding freedom. It is true that it is only one word, thus, its impact is great. People who sought independence in the United States in 1777 had clearly realized the importance of that word, and vividly insisted on in the opening of the independence declaration statement: “We hold these truths to be...   [tags: religion, assembly, press]
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648 words
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The First Amendment in High School - What is the age that a person should be able to claim rights under the first amendment. The first thing would come to most people's mind is eighteen. However, upon examination, someone could easily justify that a sixteen year old who is in his or her second year of college would have the ability to form an opinion and should be allowed to express it. What makes this student different from another student who, at sixteen, drops out of school and gets a job, or a student who decides to wear a shirt that says "PRO-CHOICE" on it....   [tags: Law] 854 words
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First Amendment: Protection of Privacy - As a private citizen, my privacy is very important, especially when in this new digital age; governmental agencies will use that information against you if they have a probable cause to. However, we are protected under the First and Fourth amendment, which gives us rights to speech, to drink or smoke in our homes without governmental intrusion. But when those rights are violated, we have the options to dispute those actions and if not satisfied with the results we can take it to the courts. But in order to do this we must limit what we say or do, in order to prevent these agencies from trying to impinge on our rights of liberty....   [tags: social media, constitutional rights] 906 words
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Limits to the First Amendment - Limits to the First Amendment The United States of America seems to be protected by a very important historical document called the Constitution. Despite the fact that it was written and signed many years ago, the American people and their leaders still have faith in the Constitution. One of the major statements of the Constitution is the First Amendment, freedom of speech. Although it is difficult to decide what is offensive and what is not, it is clear to see that songs of rape, violence, bigotry, and songs containing four letter words are completely unnecessary for susceptible minds to acknowledge....   [tags: Papers] 1160 words
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The Amish and The First Amendment - When our forefathers were forming our new nation in 1776, they wrote the first amendment so that any religion, no matter what principles they are based on, would have equal rights in America. Opinions though, make the first amendment very difficult to be followed. People usually have one mind set, to follow what they believe and stereotype everyone else. “These stereotypes are the archenemies of learning” (Wagner 6). Learning is the basis of life. By stereotyping though, the less common religions, like Amish, are less noticed....   [tags: Religion]
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1230 words
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Our Living Shield: The First Amendment - Our Living Shield: The First Amendment The authors of the Constitution of the United States created a magnificent list of liberties which were, at the time ascribed, to most people belonging to the United States. The main author, James Madison, transported the previous ideas of f undamental liberties from the great libertarians around the world, such as John Lilburne, John Locke, William Walwyn and John Milton. Madison and other previous libertarians of his time were transposed into seventeen different rights which were to be secured to all those in the United States....   [tags: essays research papers] 815 words
(2.3 pages)
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Book Banning and First Amendment Right - ... 20, 2013). As this concerns books, people should have the freedom to choose what they want to read and what they don't want to read. By banning books, our basic rights as US citizens are abused. Book banning affects many different people, from the people who read books to the people who write them. Why do people ban or try to ban books. 
 Most people ban books with the best intentions; they want to protect others from different ideas and information. Adults often do this because they feel that the book is frightening or has controversial ideas....   [tags: censorship in the US] 1699 words
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Freedom of the Press - Freedom of the press is part of the five main freedoms represented in the first amendment of the constitution of the United States. The constitution was ratified in 1791 putting freedom of the press in full development. Since then many cases have evolved with this freedom, and the freedom had some role of developing future amendments and technology in modern day. Freedom of the press had a history even before its ratification, it helped to solve many court cases, and is used throughout modern times. First of all, this is the definition of freedom of the press from lawbrain.com....   [tags: The First Amendment]
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1148 words
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The Pledge of Allegiance - Under God, With Liberty and Justice for All The Pledge of Allegiance has been recited through the hallways of American public schoolhouses for centuries. This anthem to America starts each school day by students pledging and appreciating the freedoms and liberties America provides to citizens of the United States. The issues surrounding this Iconic American Symbol are these simple but valiant words, “Under God”. These words have caused lawsuits forcing the Supreme Court answer the following questions: 1....   [tags: First Amendment, Schoolchildren]
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908 words
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Analysis of The case of the Pledge of Allegiance - The primary goal of this essay is to examine whether the first amendment goes too far in protecting free speech, like the case of the Pledge of Allegiance. Therefore, to establish this argument, this essay will first consider the speech overview, as well as the limitations. Subsequently, the essay would also put into consideration the aspects of Freedom in the Classroom. Basing my work on the “first amendment does not go too far in protecting free speech in the case of the Pledge of Allegiance” as the claim; my essay would revolve around the components of both the Speech Overview, as well as the Freedom in the Classroom....   [tags: first amendment, free speech, freedom]
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960 words
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Analysis of the Intellectual Manipulation of Ads - Advertising as an influence, both negative and positive, on social constructs of body image has been the subject of debate about the responsibility ads have to their audience. Given that there are more effective means of protecting potential viewers from the negative aspects, ads, considered as art, should not have restrictions placed on them that would violate the advertisers' First Amendment rights. Opposition to loaded, modified, or invented human forms that suggest restraining advertisers' creative freedoms may overlook the alternatives....   [tags: advertising, body image, first amendment]
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841 words
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The Impact of Social Media in Modern Jobs - How can social media websites get a person fired from their job. People get fired every day in the world we live in. People’s jobs can be terminated for many different reasons such as unbecoming behavior, misconduct, and stealing. The most recent new reason for termination from a job is due to social medial. A majority of people who are employed are given a code of conduct paper to sign and are expected to follow their employer’s rules and regulations. For example, if an on duty police officer in uniform came out of a convenient store with a case of beer they would be disciplined or terminated....   [tags: hippa, first amendment, unprofessional behavior]
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Did President Hoover Limit the First Amendment Rights of the Bonus Army? - PROMPT: “Was President Herbert Hoover justified in limiting the 1st amendment rights of the Bonus Army?” --------------------- The question “Was President Herbert Hoover justified in limiting the 1st amendment rights of the Bonus Army?” is somewhat fallacious in that it attempts to enforce a viewpoint that Hoover did indeed limit the 1st amendment rights of the Bonus Army. The 1st amendment specifically guarantees “the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” It does not provide for violent protest, nor does it prevent the government from relocating people from public property....   [tags: constitution, american presidents] 692 words
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Gregory Lee Johnson's Freedom Court Case - The United States first amendment states, congress cannot pass a law prohibiting a citizen’s freedom of speech. In 1984, Gregory Lee Johnson burned an American flag to protest against Reagan during the republican national convention. He was arrested and charged with abuse of an item if the action were to provoke anger in others. Texas court tried and convicted Johnson, he appealed claiming that his behavior was protected by the first amendment. The Supreme Court agreed to hear his case. The issue was whether flag burning compromises emblematic speech secured by the first amendment....   [tags: free speech, first amendment, flag burning]
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The Eighth Amendment - The 8th Amendment to the Constitution of the United States prohibits cruel and unusual punishment, as well as the setting of excessive bail or the imposition of excessive fines. However, it has also been deemed unconstitutional by the Supreme Court of the United States (according to the Eighth Amendment)to inflict physical damage on students in a school environment for the purpose of discipline in most circumstances. The 8th Amendment stipulates that bail shall not be excessive. This is unclear as to whether or not there is a constitutional right to bail, or only prohibits excessive bail, if it is to be granted....   [tags: Eighth Amendment Essays]
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Benefits of the Second Amendment - After a long, exhausting, painful war for independence from Great Britain, the United States became its own nation, a nation of choice and rights, a nation of voice and strong opinion, a nation with freedom handed to humans by God. The birth of this glorious new state brought forth a new era of revolution throughout the world. Countries took America’s victory to heart, overthrowing their monarchial governments and establishing governments run by popular sovereignty. The existence of the United States, perhaps, led to the global fight for self-government....   [tags: 2nd Amendment Constitution The Right To Bear Arms]
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The Fourteenth Amendment and Equality Under the Law - The Fourteenth Amendment and Equality Under the Law The Fourteenth Amendment was adopted in 1868 as one of the longest amendments to the Constitution with five parts in total. The most significant part is section one. In the very first sentence of section one, . All persons born or naturalized in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, as citizens of the United States and of the state where in they reside. citizenship was universalized. The Amendment was designed to prohibit state governments from curtailing the rights of former slaves after the Civil War, however it has been used to grant all of the personal liberties and rights conveyed in the Bill of Rights....   [tags: Papers 14th Amendment History Essays ] 776 words
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The Fourteenth Amendment - On a date that will be remembered forever as a step forward for our nation, July 28, 1868, the Fourteenth Amendment became part of the U.S. Constitution. The Fourteenth Amendment gave a new sense of hope and inspiration to a once oppressed people. It was conceived to be the foundation for restoring America to its great status and prosperity. The Amendment allowed “equal protection under the law”, no matter what race, religion, sex, sexual preference or social status. It was designed to protect the newly freed slaves....   [tags: Racism Equality Constitution Essays] 762 words
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The Title of Nobility Amendment - There are 33 amendments that have been offered up by Congress of those six flopped ratification by the mandatory three quarters of the state senates and four are officially still awaiting decision before state politicians. Beginning with the eighteenth amendment every amendment that was presented except for the nineteenth amendment and the still unresolved child labor amendment of 1924 has a definite time limit for ratification. There lies a mystery in the very first Thirteenth Amendment, the Titles of Nobility Amendment presented in 1810, which would have eliminated the citizenship of any American acquiring a title of nobility or honor from any foreign power or otherwise, the mystery is whe...   [tags: Disappearance, Citizenship, Time] 931 words
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Abortion and the Privacy Amendment - Abortion and the Privacy Amendment A U.S. citizen's "right to privacy" was first discussed in an 1890 Harvard Law Review article in which two Boston lawyers, Louis Brandeis and Samuel Warren, defined it as "the right to be let alone." Since then, the right to privacy has provided the basis for a stream of revolutionary and controversial constitutional interpretations by courts across the United States, culminating in the U.S. Supreme Court's Roe v. Wade decision in 1973. Although decisions have come down in favor of a right to privacy, they are largely based on a broad and disputed interpretation of the Fourteenth Amendment....   [tags: Argumentative Persuasive Topics] 807 words
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The Social Value of 19th Amendment - The 19th Amendment recognized the right of women to participate in politics equally like men. Well, do you know when it was ratified. It was on August 8th, 1920, which is really recent. After more than seventy years of relentless work, women finally won the struggle. The 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution prevents the United States federal government and the states from denying the right of citizens to vote on the basis of their sex. In other words, it guarantees the right to vote for all Americans including blacks and women....   [tags: presidencial elections, civil war]
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Revision of the Eighth Amendment - The Bill of Rights is a very important document to American citizens. The Bill of Rights is the beginning part of the American Constitution which is made of the first ten amendments which state our basic rights as United States’ citizens. It ensures us of our freedoms that cannot be taken away from us. However, I do believe that there is a certain amendment out of the ten that should be revised; this would be the Eighth Amendment. The Eighth Amendment reads “Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishment inflicted.” (Legal Dictionary)....   [tags: Crimes, Bill of Rights]
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A Taxing Amendment, The Revenue Act - Before the 16th Amendment, a federal income tax was technically illegal, as stated in Article I, Section 9 of the Constitution : “No capitation, or other direct, tax shall be laid, unless in proportion to the census or enumeration herein before directed to be taken.” Therefore, the federal government had to rely on land sales, excise taxes, and tariffs to raise revenue. In times of crisis, however, these measures were simply not enough. During the Civil War, when the Union desperately needed funds, Congress passed the Revenue Act (1861), which included a provision for the nation’s first income tax....   [tags: supreme court, income tax]
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Boxer-Snowe Amendment - Abortion Rights and the Boxer-Snowe Amendment February 15, 2001 was the first day the Global Democracy Act of 2001 was to be introduced by Senator’s Barbara Boxer, Olympia Snowe and Lincoln Chafee. This legislation would prevent the United States from imposing undemocratic and dangerous restrictions on health providers overseas. Representatives Nita Lowey and Nancy Johnson also would be introducing matching legislation in the house when it returned from recess. Senator Boxer and Representative Lowey developed the legislation in response to the “global gag rule,” imposed by President Bush on January 22, 2001 on the 28th anniversary of the Roe v....   [tags: essays research papers] 636 words
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Enforcing the Second Amendment - With all the unpredictability in the world today many American citizens exercise their second amendment rights and choose to own a firearm to defend themselves, their families, and their property. Growth shows about four million new gun owners each year in the U.S. (Doherty 46 -47). Some research has shown that a 41% decline in violent crimes over the past two decades can be partly attributed to the lessening of firearm carrying laws, and that enabled lawful citizens to defend themselves (Doherty 46 -47)....   [tags: Role of Gun Laws]
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Amendment 66: Tax Increase for Education Initutive - Did you know that over fifty percent of students in Colorado DO NOT read, write, add, or subtract at grade level. This statistic is alarming and should create concern for the future of our country. This statistic is one of the motivating factors behind the proposed Amendment 66. The following text will explain Amendment 66, why it will not help kids the way it was advertised to the voting public, how it hurts small businesses, and why it is ultimately wrong for Colorado. First off, what is Amendment 66....   [tags: taxes, small businesses, schools] 774 words
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The Second Amendment: Why It Is Important to Our Country - On December 15, 1791, the Bill of Rights was ratified effective by Congress. These first ten amendments to the Constitution of the United States of America promised the states certain rights and freedoms which could not be infringed by the government. After all, the founding fathers knew from experience that men in their weakness were often tempted by power. They had become all too familiar with this when under the control of King George in England. Therefore, in order to protect the future people of their beautiful country, they promised certain liberties which could not be taken away....   [tags: rights, freedoms, government, power, defend]
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The Bill of Rights and Equality - In the country of America, where freedom reigns it is almost incomprehensive that many citizens are being frowned upon for using their Bill of Rights given by the constitution. The lack of honoring the basic principles founded in the constitution and the rights of individualism is unacceptable. The lack of respect for every American’s unalienable rights is growing and it should not be tolerated. The first amendment of the United States Constitution grants an American citizen the freedom of speech (law.cornell.edu) John Locke wrote that every human is entitled to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness....   [tags: first ammendment of the Constitution]
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Should Hate Speech be Regulated? - Imagine a person talking with a hand holding their tongue, it sounds pretty uncomfortable. Now, image a person having to do that every time talking to their friends, family members, or boyfriend/girlfriend. Holding their tongue would restrict them of what they could say and when they could say it. Believe it or not, this is a topic that has been tossed around from Supreme Court to everyday life. People have different opinions on how it should be regulated or if it should be regulated. It is hate speech....   [tags: restriction violates the first ammendment] 1537 words
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Analysis of the 4th Amendment - The Bill of Rights or the first 10 amendments to the Constitution was proposed to Congress in 1789 by James Madison in response to the Anti- Federalist movement that lobbied for an extended amount of rights that would further safeguard liberty. The 4th amendment in particular was drafted to acknowledge the abuse of the writ of assistance, a “search warrant” issued by the British government to search boats that were thought to contain smuggled material in Colonial America. The 4th amendment can be broken down into 3 parts: what activities are considered to be a “search” or a “seizure”; what is a probable cause for a “search” and “seizure” and finally, how violations should be dealt with....   [tags: The Bill of Rights] 643 words
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"Weeding" Out Amendment 64 - ... Without changing this poorly written amendment, schools are being burdened with marijuana related problems. Legalizing marijuana to allow adults to purchase it for recreational use is being directly correlated to an increase of drug use in Colorado’s middle and high schools. Many school and police officials feel that this rise is due to the fact that marijuana is no longer illegal. “’We have seen a sharp rise in drug-related disciplinary actions which anecdotally, from credible sources, is being attributed to the changing social norms surrounding marijuana,’ said Janelle Krueger” (Lofholm)....   [tags: marijuana, youth, drugs, minds]
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The Second Amendment and Gun control - ... Imagine if that is no longer an option, more people will seek illegal ways to get guns and the criminal rate will just increase. Criminals will see that people will be defenceless and they will flourish in many towns.”Such a ban will only increase the criminal ability to victimize the innocent.” “Over the past 20 years, gun sales have absolutely exploded, but homicides with firearms are down 39 percent during that time and “other crimes with firearms” are down 69 percent.” This was the number 1 in the 18 little-known gun facts that prove that guns make us safer, written by Michael Snyder....   [tags: criminals, firearms, homicides] 700 words
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Lowering the Voting Age to 18 - Many people opposed the change of voting age, but others believed that it should be lowered. People who think that the voting age should stay the same usually are the conservative people who want to keep the old customs as they are. People who are conservative are usually cautious about changes, and usually want to stay put without improvement. The people who want changes are usually more liberal. These people leave place for improvements, but sometimes vote for the change of things that are not supposed to be changed....   [tags: The 26th Amendment]
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The Death Penalty: A Violation of 8th Amendment - Don't you think that putting people to death is brutal. Wouldn't you rather have them stay in prison for the rest of their lives. In fact, it costs far more to execute a person then to keep him or her in prison for life. The EighthAmendment states that it prevents cruel and unusual punishment, and the death penalty is violating it. The Supreme Court case, McCleskey v. Kemp (1987) violates the Eighth Amendment purpose. Therefore, the death penalty clearly defies the Eighth Amendment and shouldn't be used for people who have convicted murder....   [tags: punishment, cruel, murder]
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Gun Control: Is It Really in the Second Amendment - ... Unfortunately there are news stories almost every day reporting some type of firearm tragedy. It is almost the anniversary of the Sandy Hook shooting that took place last year on December 14th 2012. A man named Adam Lanza entered Sandy Hook Elementary with a gun and shot down the door and entered the building. He ended up killing 20 first graders, 6 adults and himself (Altimari, Goode). One of the reasons the gun control topic has been such a big topic is because the shooting effected innocent children....   [tags: violence, death, background, checks] 775 words
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Protecting Life, Liberty, and Property in the Bill of Rights - Bill of Rights Essay “ The government is morally obligated to serve people and protect their rights such as life, liberty, and property. “ The Constitution had no effect against the Articles of Confederation. The Constitution was created to make a stronger central government to protect the rights of its people. The social contract protects the natural rights, while the Constitution protects every other rights, like adding an extra layer of protection. The writers intention of the Bill of Rights was to ensure the safety of citizens rights without them being violated....   [tags: constitution, amendment, supreme court] 839 words
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The Success and Failure of the Prohibition - “What America needs now is a drink,” declared President Franklin D. Roosevelt at the end of the Prohibition. The Prohibition was the legal prohibiting of the manufacture and sale of alcohol. This occurred in the United States in the early twentieth century. The Prohibition began with the Temperance movement and capitalized with the Eighteenth Amendment. The Prohibition came with unintended effects such as the Age of Gangsterism, loopholes around the law, and negative impacts on the economy. The Prohibition came to an end during the Great Depression with the election Franklin D....   [tags: temperance movement,liquor,18th amendment]
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How the Earl Warren Court Liberalized America - ... Board of Education (1954). The cases of Gideon v. Wainwright (1963), Escobedo v. Illinois (1964) and Miranda v. Arizona (1966), all helped define Due Process and the rights of defendants. In the court case of Gideon v. Wainwright, the Supreme Court ruled that if the defendant can not afford an attorney, then one will be provided for them. Also, under the Supreme Court’s ruling of the case of Miranda v. Arizona, meaning that when arrested, your basic rights must be stated, that you have the right to remain silent and that anything you say can and will be used in court....   [tags: amendment, rights, segregation] 834 words
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How the Failure of Reconstruction Impacted African Americans - After a war that claimed the lives of more men than that of all other wars combined, much of the country was left in ruins, literally and figuratively. Dozens of towns in the South had been burned to the ground. Meanwhile, the relations between the North and South had crumbled to pieces. Something needed to be done so that the country could once again be the United States of America, not the Divided States of America. The years from 1865 to 1877 were a time of rebuilding – the broken communities and the broken relations....   [tags: 13th amendment, war, reconstruction]
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Freedom of Speech in Cinema - Much like football and fresh apple pie, the cinema is an American pastime. It is rooted in the 20th century and has matured over the decades, mirroring the social and cultural growth of our nation. Compared to their precursors, contemporary films vary in content and target audience and convey a multitude of messages to viewers. But film would not demonstrate such variety without the cultural staple of our media, a constitutional right that is, in itself, an American pastime. Freedom of speech, as provided by the First Amendment, has fertilized the growth of cinema, and, in kind, the history of film has proven that free speech is easily applied to many media platforms, protective of controve...   [tags: social growth, culture, media, First Ammendment]
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