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First Amendment Rights, Privacy and the Paparazzi

- First Amendment Rights, Privacy and the Paparazzi The question of paparazzi threatening privacy and First Amendment rights is often to situational to argue in a conventional manner, but certainly there are many facets of the issue which can be addressed in a quite straightforward manner. Celebrities who feel they have the right to privacy in public places often muddy the waters of this issue. Oddly enough, those celebrities who have chosen to speak out against what they feel are violations of their privacy most always begin their campaigns with a large press conference....   [tags: First Amendment Right to Privacy]

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The Importance of the First Amendment of the United States’ Bill of Rights for Democratic Government and its Citizens

- Being expression one of the most important rights of the people to maintain a connected society right to speech should be accepted to do so. The first amendment is one of the most fundamental rights that individuals have. It is fundamental to the existence of democracy and the respect of human dignity. This amendment describes the principal rights of the citizens of the United States. If the citizens were unable to criticize the government, it would be impossible to regulate order. By looking freedom of speech there is also freedom of assembly and freedom of press that are crucial for the United States democracy. According to the “Derechos, Human Rights”, freedom of speech is one of the most...   [tags: First Amendment, USA, Bill of Rights, Democracy, G]

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The First Amendment

- The First Amendment is the first section of the Bill of Rights and is often considered the most important part of the U.S Constitution because it guarantees the citizens of United States the essential personal freedoms of religion, speech, press, peaceful assembly and the freedom to petition the Government. Thanks to the rights granted by the First Amendment, Americans are able to live in a country where they can freely express themselves, speak their mind, pray without interference, protest in peace and where their opinions are taken into consideration, which is something not many other nationalities have the fortune of saying....   [tags: bill of rights, constitution, Madison]

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The First Amendment

- America has been built on freedom throughout the years. Freedom to speak, freedom to choose, freedom to worship, and freedom to do just about anything you want within that of the law. America’s law has been designed to protect and preserve these freedoms. The First Amendment guarantees freedom of religion, speech, press, assembly, and petition. It assures citizens that the federal government shall not restrict freedom of worship. It specifically prohibits Congress from establishing an official, government supported church....   [tags: The Bill of Rights]

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The Freedom Provieded by the First Amendment

- Civilizations and empires throughout history had risen and collapsed for just one word. Some like a summer night died young, while others lasted for centuries. The word was repeated consecutively by the greatest men of all times, and their blood was shed in order to fulfill it. Starting or even before William Wallace and until our present time with the raging of the Arab Spring people have been demanding freedom. It is true that it is only one word, thus, its impact is great. People who sought independence in the United States in 1777 had clearly realized the importance of that word, and vividly insisted on in the opening of the independence declaration statement: “We hold these truths to be...   [tags: religion, assembly, press]

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The First Amendment in Public Schools

- The First Amendment was added to the Constitution in 1789 in order to secure individual rights to freedom of religion, speech, and the press in America. The First Amendment states, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances” (Resources). Various government officials and supporters of constitutional rights of individuals have staunchly defended students’ First Amendment rights on public school property....   [tags: american politics, the constitution]

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The Fisrt Amendment Analysis: Basic Freedom

- The interpretation of the first amendment has been seen throughout our history and, it had either been incorporated in a manner of conservancy or alteration. The first amendment basically describes what congress was under limited power to and, our basic freedoms. However, the concern was never questioned if the state government can curb those liberties since during the ratification of the bill there was little concern of this even being true. This had proven to be reality later on with the various cases that questioned not only the first, but several other amendments....   [tags: first amendment, amendments, freedom]

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The Amish and The First Amendment

- When our forefathers were forming our new nation in 1776, they wrote the first amendment so that any religion, no matter what principles they are based on, would have equal rights in America. Opinions though, make the first amendment very difficult to be followed. People usually have one mind set, to follow what they believe and stereotype everyone else. “These stereotypes are the archenemies of learning” (Wagner 6). Learning is the basis of life. By stereotyping though, the less common religions, like Amish, are less noticed....   [tags: Religion]

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Freedom of Speech: The First Amendment

- When the Constitution of the United States was ratified it mainly addressed the structure of the government with very few liberties for the individual. However, the states demanded a bill of rights that addressed the rights of the individuals as well. As a result, the Constitution began to adapt and change by adding amendments. Today the Bill of Rights still continues to change based on the will of the people and the judgment of the U.S. Supreme Court however, the core principles that our country was founded on has remained the same....   [tags: bill of rights, censorship]

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Reflection on the First Amendment

- “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or the press, or the right of peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for the redress of grievances” (United States Constitution). In 1789 the anti-federalist main concern was that the Constitution’s lack of adequate guarantees for civil liberties. To provide such guarantees, the First Amendment along with the other nine Amendments known as the Bill of Rights were submitted to the states for ratification on September 25, 1789 and adopted on December 15, 1791....   [tags: US Government]

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First Amendment: Protection of Privacy

- As a private citizen, my privacy is very important, especially when in this new digital age; governmental agencies will use that information against you if they have a probable cause to. However, we are protected under the First and Fourth amendment, which gives us rights to speech, to drink or smoke in our homes without governmental intrusion. But when those rights are violated, we have the options to dispute those actions and if not satisfied with the results we can take it to the courts. But in order to do this we must limit what we say or do, in order to prevent these agencies from trying to impinge on our rights of liberty....   [tags: social media, constitutional rights]

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Analysis of the First Amendment

- 1. In the First Amendment, the clause that states “Congress shall make no law respecting the establishment of religion” is based on the Establishment Clauses that is incorporated in the amendment. This clauses prohibits the government to establish a state religion and then enforce it on its citizens to believe it. Without this clause, the government can force participation in this chosen religion, and then punish anyone who does not obey to the faith chosen. This clause was in issue in a court case mentioned in Gaustad’s reading “Proclaim Liberty Throughout All the Land”....   [tags: clause, establishment of religion]

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First Amendment and Free Speech

- This paper will examine the first amendment’s right to free speech based on three different Supreme Court cases and how there are varying examples of free speech. In the case of Snyder v. Phelps, Snyder sued Phelps, the Westboro Baptist Church, for intentional infliction of emotional distress, invasion of privacy by intrusion upon seclusion, and conspiracy because the church set-up protest outside of his military son’s funeral service (Chen et al., 2010). Another side of free speech involves a case which allow schools to restrict speech that is promoting illegal drug use....   [tags: Legal Precedent, Flag Burning]

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The First Amendment of the United States Constitution

- The United States Constitution was signed on September 17th, 1787. It did not include a bill of rights and it did not include their freedoms. And so, on September 25, 1789 Congress passed the first ten amendments, which were later ratified on December 15, 1791. The Bill of Rights was created by the Founding Fathers with the intent of restricting the powers of the new national government. The Bill of Rights, however, consists of 10 amendments. The first of the amendments was written because the people at America’s establishment wanted their basic freedoms guaranteed....   [tags: amendments, bill of rights, citizen freedom]

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Limitations to Free Speech in the First Amendment

- To many the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution guarantees the right to say anything you want at any time you want, and not be arrested, but the first amendment does not protect all speech. What do I mean by this. Over the years the Supreme Court has rejected an interpretation of the First Amendment that gives the right to free speech without limits. For example speech that impedes national security, justice, and personal safety is not protected by the First Amendment. If you know of limits you would probably think first of speech that presents a danger to other people or speech that is false or makes true statement misleading (otherwise known as Libel and Slander)....   [tags: advertising, law, supreme court]

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The First Amendment to the United States Constitution

- December 15, 1791 the First Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified, guaranteeing that "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech." At an absolute minimum, the Establishment Clause was intended to prohibit the federal government from declaring and financially supporting a national religion, such as existed in many other countries at the time of the nation's founding (University of Missouri-Kansas City, 2011)....   [tags: American History]

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Pornography: Prostitution or First Amendment Right

- There is a knock on the door A young woman is sitting on the bed; she is desperate, a mess. She tells the person at the door to come in. She has been sold to this man for the night, to do whatever he commands. He tells her what he wants and begins to unbuckle his belt. After a while everything is quiet, except the rustling of clothes being put on. The woman lies on the bed in shame as the man dresses and throws a wad of cash towards the young woman. In another place is a studio. In the studio a woman is sitting on a bed; she is nervous and desperate....   [tags: paid sexual relations, practices, penalties]

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Book Banning and First Amendment Right

- ... 20, 2013). As this concerns books, people should have the freedom to choose what they want to read and what they don't want to read. By banning books, our basic rights as US citizens are abused. Book banning affects many different people, from the people who read books to the people who write them. Why do people ban or try to ban books. 
 Most people ban books with the best intentions; they want to protect others from different ideas and information. Adults often do this because they feel that the book is frightening or has controversial ideas....   [tags: censorship in the US]

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The First Amendment

- Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people to assemble peacefully, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. The first and the most significant of the amendments to our Constitution is the First Amendment. "The amendment that established our freedoms as citizens of our new confederation." The First Amendment insures freedom of speech and of the press....   [tags: Constitution US History Government]

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The First Amendment

- The First Amendment The foundation of today's society rests upon the words of our forefathers. The Constitution claims that "the people" shape their own government. Who are "the people"to which this document refers. Americans have long struggled with defining "the people". Blacks, women, and homosexuals all deal with this issue, b ut today youth emerge as a challenged group. Students are often a censored body, thus not enjoying protection under the First Amendment. Schools profess they are protecting the rights of the majority, but in actuality, they are violating the rights of the individual through the denial of their First Amendment rights....   [tags: Papers]

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The First Amendment

- The First Amendment America was built on freedom. Freedom to speak, freedom to choose, freedom to worship, and freedom to do just about anything you want within the law. America’s law was designed to protect and preserve these freedoms. The reason the United States of America came to exist was because the colonists fled Great Britain to get back the freedoms that were taken away from them by the Monarchy. In countries where Monarchies and Dictatorships rule, there is little if any freedom to speak of....   [tags: Bill Rights Constitution Government USA Essays]

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The First Amendment

- The First Amendment "I'll need to see that before it goes to press." Almost every journalism student in America hears these ten inevitable words before the distribution of their school's newspapers. Recently, student journalists have been heavily censored due to the 1988 Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier Supreme Court decision. One of the major consequences of this decision was that since the Supreme Court felt that the First Amendment, stating that, "Congress shall make no law…abridging the freedom of speech or of the press," (Amendment I, A6), was no longer sufficient to protect student journalists, the states would have to figure out a solution themselves (Foerstel 217)....   [tags: Papers]

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The First Amendment

- Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people to assemble peacefully, and to petition the Government for e redress of grievances. The first and inargueably the most significant of the amendments to our Constitution is the First Amendment. The amendment that established our freedoms as citizens of our new confederation. The First Amendment insured, among other things, freedom of speech and of the press....   [tags: essays research papers]

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The First Amendment

- The First Amendment The 1st Amendment forbids Congress from enacting laws that would regulate speech or press before publication or punish after publication. At various times many states passed laws in contradiction to the freedoms guaranteed in the 1st Amendment. However broadcast has always been considered a special exemption to free speech laws for two reasons. 1) the most important reasons is the scarcity of spectrum and the 2) is the persuasiveness of the medium. Because radio and TV come into the house, and may be heard or seen by unsupervised children, the government feels a special responsibility to protect the American people....   [tags: Papers]

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Construction of an Islamic Center near Ground Zero

- The approval by the authorities in the United States to build an Islamic cultural center at a location near the spot of the September the eleventh attacks in America resulted in a controversy that touched on the basic rights of Americans protected by the first amendment of the American constitution. The Commission for Landmark Preservation in New York approved the construction of the Islamic center just two blocks away from the site of the World Trade Center because the two buildings torn apart to give way for the construction of the Islamic center were not very distinctive landmarks in Manhattan (Aljazeera)....   [tags: The First Amendment]

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Significance of The Free Exercise Clause

- The Free Exercise Clause of the First Amendment states “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof”. Meaning, Congress cannot forbid or ban the exercises or beliefs of any religion. However, the government can in fact interfere with religions practices. This means that the government cannot prohibit the beliefs of any religion, but can intervene in certain practices. The origins of the first Amendment date back to when the Constitution and Bill of rights were first being debated and written down....   [tags: First Amendment ]

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The Importance of the First Amendment

- The Importance of the First Amendment "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of Religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech," this Amendment is the most important part of the constitution. Without free speech, we the people of the United States would not be able to speak openly and freely about issues that affect our everyday life. Had it not been for Katie Stanton and Susan B. Anthony exercising their first amendment right to free speech and peaceful assembly, and the press covering and catching the women's suffrage movement it is possible that women may not have gained the legal right to vote until many years later....   [tags: Papers]

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Flag Burning and the First Amendment

-    Your First Amendment rights are extremely close to being violated by none other than the United States Congress. I refer to the Flag Desecration Bill that, if passed, would do irreparable damage to our right to free speech and undermine the very priniciples for which the American flag stands. Fortunately, West Virginians have an ally in Sen. Robert C. Byrd. Sen. Byrd, who previously favored the bill, now fights to protect our rights by stopping the passage of this bill. I applaud his stand and want to reinforce his position....   [tags: Argumentative Persuasive Topics]

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The Evolution Of The First Amendment

- The Evolution of the First Amendment The first amendment states, "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.(encyclopedia) The inhabitants of the North American colonies did not have a legal right to express opposition to the British government that ruled them....   [tags: essays research papers fc]

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The First Amendment in High School

- What is the age that a person should be able to claim rights under the first amendment. The first thing would come to most people's mind is eighteen. However, upon examination, someone could easily justify that a sixteen year old who is in his or her second year of college would have the ability to form an opinion and should be allowed to express it. What makes this student different from another student who, at sixteen, drops out of school and gets a job, or a student who decides to wear a shirt that says "PRO-CHOICE" on it....   [tags: Law]

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Modern Interpretation of The First Amendment

- Modern Interpretation of The First Amendment The first Amendment of the United States Constitution says; “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.”[1] Our fore fathers felt that this statement was plain enough for all to understand, however quite often the United States government deems it necessary to make laws to better define those rights that are stated in the Constitution....   [tags: essays papers]

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The First Amendment: Free Of Expression

- The First Amendment: Free of Expression In 1787 our forefathers ratified the constitution of the United States of America, which contains the most important document to any American citizen, the Bill of Rights. The first amendment of the Bill of Rights states: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the establishment thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech; or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Freedom of Speech vs Censorship

- We are blessed to live in a country that has many rights, the most important is the freedom of speech which provides an umbrella of protection over our remaining rights; however, all of our rights are under attack beginning with the First Amendment which is under constant assault by censorship. The Constitution of the United States says that “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” Censorship as defined by Wikipedia is “the suppression of speech or dele...   [tags: First Amendment]

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Reflections On The First Amendment

- Reflections on the First Amendment On December 15th, 1971, the first X amendments to the Constitution went into affect. The first X amendments to the constitution were known as the Bill of Rights. The First Amendment was written by James Madison because the American people were demanding a guarantee of their freedom. The First Amendment was put into place to protect American’s freedom of speech, freedom of religion, freedom of assembly and freedom of petition. The First Amendment was written as follows; “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people...   [tags: Political Science]

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Limits to the First Amendment

- Limits to the First Amendment The United States of America seems to be protected by a very important historical document called the Constitution. Despite the fact that it was written and signed many years ago, the American people and their leaders still have faith in the Constitution. One of the major statements of the Constitution is the First Amendment, freedom of speech. Although it is difficult to decide what is offensive and what is not, it is clear to see that songs of rape, violence, bigotry, and songs containing four letter words are completely unnecessary for susceptible minds to acknowledge....   [tags: Papers]

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First Amendment And Music Censorship

- The First Amendment to the Bill of Rights exists because the Founders of our country understood the importance of free expression. The First Amendment states "Congress shall make no law . . . abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press . . ." (Commission on the Bicentennial of the United States Constitution 17). One of the ways the American people use this freedom of speech and expression is through the creation of the art form known as music. Music's verbal expression bonds our society through our emotions and experiences....   [tags: Censorship]

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Youth and the First Amendment

- Youth and the First Amendment Many freedom of speech and expression issues that receive media attention have to do with the adult population and what they feel their rights are. What many fail to recognize is the fact that the youth today are also dealing with freedom of speech and expression issues in their own lives. The freedom of speech and expression issues that young people deal with are just as important and are handled in the same manner as any other freedom of speech issue. Three articles from The Associated Press deal with freedom of speech and expression of middle and high school aged young people....   [tags: Essays Papers]

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First Amendment and the Constitutional Freedoms in Amercan Schools

- The First Amendment, usually equated with freedom of speech, affords five protections: Establishment Clause, Free exercise of religion, Freedom of speech, Freedom of press, and Freedom to peaceable assemble. Students (and student groups) in public colleges and universities enjoy full protection under the First Amendment; however, this right depends greatly on the context in which a student might raise a free speech claim. Once an institution creates a limited public forum for a student or group, administration cannot deny recognition to particular student or groups based on viewpoints....   [tags: freedom of speech, constitutional freedoms]

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First Amendment Rights of Public School Students

- First Amendment Rights of Public School Students How the judicial branch rules in cases relating to the 1st and how they relate that to all the rights of public school students. This includes anything from flag burning to not saluting the flag to practicing religion in school. The main point of this paper is to focus on the fact that schools have a greater ability to restrict speech than government. Research Question Does government or school districts have the greater ability to restrict free speech....   [tags: judicial branch, rights, students]

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The First Amendment

- In America the Amendment 1 of the U.S. Constitution gives the American people the right to peaceably assemble and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. Most notably Amendment 1 is known for and most often cited as giving the Freedom of Speech. Even before this amendment was ratified people in the U.S. were protesting, as in the Boston Tea Party. Protesting has been a way to effect change in America. A question to ask is this: is there a right way or wrong way to protest. Others protest that has had an effect on America since the Amendment was ratified are protest against war such as Vietnam and Desert Shield/Desert Storm, Civil Rights Movement, and more recently the prot...   [tags: Freedom of Speech]

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The World Needs Wikileaks

- “KEEP US STRONG, HELP WIKILEAKS KEEP GOVERNMENTS OPEN,” Wikileaks states in its website. Since 2006 Wikileaks has been known as an organization that provides people the secrets of governments. After it was originally launched, it published 1.2 million documents within its first year. Julian Assange, Wikileaks founder, has said that Wikileaks is an international non-profit organization that publishes documents of private, secret, and classified media from anonymous sources and news leaks. Although Julian Assange is described as being the starter of Wikileaks, it has founders of Chinese dissidents, journalists, mathematicians, and technologists from multiple countries, including the United Sta...   [tags: First Amendment]

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Freedom of the Press

- Freedom of the press is part of the five main freedoms represented in the first amendment of the constitution of the United States. The constitution was ratified in 1791 putting freedom of the press in full development. Since then many cases have evolved with this freedom, and the freedom had some role of developing future amendments and technology in modern day. Freedom of the press had a history even before its ratification, it helped to solve many court cases, and is used throughout modern times. First of all, this is the definition of freedom of the press from lawbrain.com....   [tags: The First Amendment]

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Amendments to the Constitution

- The framers of our Constitution knew that time has a way of changing countries and their citizens. Our country was in a whirlwind of change in 1789 as people were experiencing freedom from the tyranny of England for the first time in their lives. Our country was being molded and formed into a great nation by the founding fathers. Expectations and rules had to be set to protect the rights of the minorities and majorities. Amendments to the Constitution were written to ensure equality for all in changing times....   [tags: First Amendment, Second Amendment]

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First Amendment

- First Amendment The modern American conception of freedom of speech comes from the principles of freedom of the press, and freedom of religion as they developed in England, starting in the seventeenth century. The arguments of people like John Milton on the importance of an unlicensed press, and of people like John Locke on religious toleration, were all the beginning for the idea of the “freedom of speech”. By the year of 1791, when the First Amendment was ratified, the idea of “freedom of speech” was so widely accepted that it became the primary, and a very important issue in the amendment....   [tags: Governmental Freedom Constitution Essays]

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The First Amendment and its Impact on Media

- The First Amendment and its Impact on Media Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. The first amendment to the United State's constitution is one of the most important writings in our short history. The first amendment has defined and shaped our country into what it is today....   [tags: Television Media TV Essays]

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Is Flag Burning Protected by the First Amendment?

- Is Flag Burning Protected by the First Amendment.          Can an individual be prosecuted for openly burning the American flag in a political protest. Gregory Johnson did this in a political protest outside Dallas City Hall. He was then tried and convicted of desecrating a venerated object under a Texas law (Penal Code 42.09), which states that "a person commits an offense if he intentionally or knowingly desecrates a state or national flag" (317). The question of whether this Texas law is in violation of the First Amendment, which "holds that Congress shall make no law......   [tags: Argumentative Persuasive Topics]

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The First Amendment and the Fight Against God

- The First Amendment and the Fight Against God On September 11, 2001, our nation experiences a terrible tragedy when four terrorist-controlled airplanes flew into the World Trade Center, the Pentagon, and a field in Pennsylvania. Over 3,000 people were killed, and thousands more were affected. In an effort to promote patriotism and unite the nation, citizens began displaying American flags, holding memorial services, and attending church. County High School also made an effort to bring together its students and faculty....   [tags: Argumentative]

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Our Living Shield: The First Amendment

- Our Living Shield: The First Amendment The authors of the Constitution of the United States created a magnificent list of liberties which were, at the time ascribed, to most people belonging to the United States. The main author, James Madison, transported the previous ideas of f undamental liberties from the great libertarians around the world, such as John Lilburne, John Locke, William Walwyn and John Milton. Madison and other previous libertarians of his time were transposed into seventeen different rights which were to be secured to all those in the United States....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Supreme Court Briefs - Civil Liberties, Cases and the First Amendment of the USA

- Supreme Court Briefs - Civil Liberties The First Amendment gives United States citizens five distinct rights. One of which gives citizens the freedom of assembly. This right gives the individual right to come together and collectively express, promote, pursue and defend the common interest. There has been many Supreme Court cases that have defined this freedom for every citizen and the United States government. Edwards v. State of South Carolina The court case, Edwards v. South Carolina, started oral arguments in December 1962....   [tags: Assembly, Civil Rights]

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The Constitutionality of Separation of Church and State, Freedom of Speech, and the First Amendment in Times of War

- The United States Constitution was originally drafted in 1787 and this did not contain the Bill of Rights. The Bill of Rights was ratified December 15, 1791 (McClenaghan 71). At that time, George Mason and others argued that it should not be included (Bender 27). James Madison believed that adding a bill of rights could give the government powers to take away people’s private rights (Madison 44). He stated that wherever power gives people the right to do something wrong, wrong doings will be done (Madison 44)....   [tags: U.S. Government ]

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Students Shoud NOT Have the Tight to Free Speech

- According to the First Amendment Center, located at Vanderbilt University and at Washington, D.C.’s Newseum, there are twelve categories of speech that are not protected by First Amendment rights. These are: “obscenity, fighting words, defamation (libel, slander), child pornography, perjury, blackmail, incitement to imminent lawless action, true threats, solicitations to commit crimes, and plagiarism of copyrighted material” (para. 2). The center also adds that “some experts also would add treason, if committed verbally” (para....   [tags: first amendment, speech]

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Should Freedom of the Press be Limited to Protect National Security?

- Should Freedom of the Press be Limited to Protect National Security. Every single American Citizen has their own rights and privileges, dating back to 1787 when the U.S. constitution was born. This was the first legal document stating citizen rights. Four years later, in 1791, the First Amendment was passed, stating several American citizen rights including Freedom of Speech, Freedom of the Press, Freedom of Religion, Freedom of Expression, the right to petition, and the right to assemble. Over the years to present day, these rights have been shifted to meet current standards....   [tags: first amendment, rights, privileges]

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Freedom of Religion and Freedom of Expression: Tinker V. Des Moines

- What if you were suspended from school because of something you were wearing. Not only was the clothing or item appropriate, it was something you were fighting for or something you believe is right. Is this fair or okay for this to happen. There is a specific incident that this situation happened to a few teenagers in Des Moines, Iowa in December of 1965. A group of students wanting to wear black armbands throughout the holiday season was in for a wake up call. (FORTAS) These plans and or idea were quickly shot down by the high school principals....   [tags: freedom, first amendment, rights]

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The Rights and Responsibilities of the Famous

- Celebrities have many of today's youth watching them, and young people are turning to their idols for judgement on what's right and wrong. Because of the First Amendment, the famous, along with everyone else, have the right to say and do what they want within legal limits, and follow whatever religion they choose. The press also have the right to write and report about celebrities. However, the famous also have the responsibility to be mindful of who is looking up to them and following their every move....   [tags: Celebrities, First Amendment, Constitution]

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1156 words | (3.3 pages) | Preview

The Rights and Responsibilities of the Famous

- Celebrities have many of today's youth watching them, and kids are turning to their idols for judgement on what's right and wrong. Because of the First Amendment, the famous, along with everyone else, have the right to say and do what they want within legal limits, and follow whatever religion they choose. However, celebrities also have the responsibility to be mindful of who is looking up to them and following their every move. They are often thrust into the position of role model before they are ready....   [tags: celebrities, idols, first amendment]

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1105 words | (3.2 pages) | Preview

US Constitution and Bill of Rights - Questions and Answers

- U.S. Constitution 1. Explain prior restraints, defamation, and sedition of the freedom of freedom of speech and freedom of the press Freedom of speech in United states are usually protected by the constitution, the only things that are not protected are cases of obscenity, defamation, war words and any form of incitement to start of riots. The other exceptions to the protection of the bill of rights on freedom of speech are harassment, privileged communications, trade secrets and any classified materials belonging to a business establishment or a company (Lieberman, 1999, p....   [tags: First Amendment, Incorporation]

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Should There Be Restrictions to Freedom of Speech

- Should there be restrictions to freedom of speech synonyms, and is there a scarcity of freedom that is given to individuals. Freedom to the people has been Americas greatest accomplishment, yet the checks and balances placed between the lines of freedom are not defined. Obscenity speeches are defined as outside the boundaries of the First Amendment protection. Libel and Slander of public figures must be proven by malice; the reckless disregard for the truth. Commercial speeches can be banned by the government as illegal if the information if deceptive to the readers....   [tags: first amendment, slander]

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537 words | (1.5 pages) | Preview

The Constitution and Freedom of Religion in the United States

- For millennia, man has persecuted himself for religion. This was due to his inability to accept other beliefs, which led to distrust, alarm, and suspicion. In its most extreme form, persecution resulted in expulsion from countries and genocide. However, as western man became more civilized, this behavior was deemed deplorable. Therefore, religious persecution morphed into a more socially acceptable pattern- discrimination. Thistransition stemmed from the establishment of the Constitution of the United States that guaranteed religious freedom....   [tags: First Amendment, Religious tolerance]

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1081 words | (3.1 pages) | Preview

J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye and Censorship

- America is a nation founded upon a set of unified core beliefs that were never meant to be opposed or infringed upon known as the Bill of Rights. As America has grown and developed over the years, these core beliefs do not seem to be as sacred as they once were. Many great pieces of art and literature have been produced, but society expectations of what is acceptable. Censorship occurs when a group of people impose their beliefs upon others, thus removing material at the request of the group. Book censorship is one of few areas that are censored from the public, and it is a shame that a select few individuals can determine what is acceptable and what is not....   [tags: First Amendment, Banning Books]

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1082 words | (3.1 pages) | Preview

Brief History of the Constitution

- Brief History of the Constitution After America declared independence no one knew what these former colonies will be or will turn out to. They, the representatives and founding fathers, had a little governing body known as the continental congress. After a long discussion with everyone the all agreed that they needed something to support them, some kind of official document to get them going as a government. The Articles of Confederation was made. Later the “Shay’s rebellion” hit, and everyone knew from that point is that they need a new document that made a stronger federal government, that the Articles of Confederation could not provide, or they will collapse....   [tags: articles of confederation, first amendment]

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1459 words | (4.2 pages) | Preview

Social Media and the Law

- The First Amendment, granting Americans the right to freedom of press, freedom of speech, freedom of religion, freedom of assembly and freedom to petition the government, has been one of the most heavily debated since its ratification in 1791. For years, court cases pertaining to the amendment have abounded, particularly in relation to the freedom of speech. From cases defining obscenity to those allowing for expression, the meaning of the freedom of speech has changed greatly through the years....   [tags: first amendment, freedom, media]

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1582 words | (4.5 pages) | Preview

Freedom of Religious Expression

- “ Freedom of religion does not equal freedom to take away the rights of other people” (Unknown). The free expressions of religion is protected by the first amendment. Proposed September 25, 1789 the framers protected their citizens against the government controlling their religious freedom. School administrators and students are at a figurative war with the meaning of this amendment. School officials have attempted to ban the use of religious banners at sporting events made by the students; the Establishment and Free Exercise Clause interfere with the school administration's responsibilities and student rights causing the freedom of religion to be used in the wrong way....   [tags: first amendment, establishment clause]

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1084 words | (3.1 pages) | Preview

The Pledge of Allegiance

- Under God, With Liberty and Justice for All The Pledge of Allegiance has been recited through the hallways of American public schoolhouses for centuries. This anthem to America starts each school day by students pledging and appreciating the freedoms and liberties America provides to citizens of the United States. The issues surrounding this Iconic American Symbol are these simple but valiant words, “Under God”. These words have caused lawsuits forcing the Supreme Court answer the following questions: 1....   [tags: First Amendment, Schoolchildren]

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The First Amendment and Conservative Rulings of the Supreme Court

- The First Amendment and Conservative Rulings of the Supreme Court The authors of the Constitution of the United States created a magnificent list of liberties which were, at the time ascribed, to most people belonging to the United States. The main author, James Madison, transported the previous ideas of fundamental liberties from the great libertarians around the world, such as John Lilburne, John Locke, William Walwyn and John Milton. Madison and other previous libertarians of his time were transposed into seventeen different rights which were to be secured to all those in the United States....   [tags: Politics Political Essays]

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Is Flag Burning protected under the First Amendment?

- Is Flag Burning protected under the First Amendment. There is a proposed amendment to make flag burning illegal. Congress tried to pass the Flag Protection Act of 1989, but the act failed because it is seen as a form of public protection. There have been other attempts to pass legislation to protect the American flag but all of the attempts have failed so far. Flag burning is very controversial because people have different definitions of what “freedom of speech” means and what our flag stands for....   [tags: Persuasive, Exemplification Essay]

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1567 words | (4.5 pages) | Preview

The Infringement Of The First Amendment In High School Theatre

- In the landmark case Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District (1969), John Tinker and his siblings decided to openly protest the Vietnam War by wearing black armbands to school (Goldman 1). The school felt that their efforts to protest the war disrupted the school environment. “The Supreme Court said that ‘in our system, undifferentiated fear or apprehension of disturbance is not enough to overcome the right to freedom of expression.’ School officials cannot silence student speech simply because they dislike it or it is controversial or unpopular” (FAQs 2)....   [tags: Freedom of Speech]

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1271 words | (3.6 pages) | Preview

Political Correctness Infringes on our First Amendment Rights

- Political Correctness Infringes on our First Amendment Rights Political correctness has become increasingly obvious in our daily lives. For example, the other day I attended the first meeting of the Frisbee Club here on the State University campus. During the meeting, we were discussing the fact we wanted shirts for this year, but we did not know what slogan to use. While in the brainstorming process, the slogan “Suck my disk” came out. At the time, the slogan “suck my disk” seemed to be better than sliced bread to a bunch of college guys....   [tags: Argumentative Persuasive Argument Essays]

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Freedom Of Expression - Our First Amendment Rights Are Threatened

- What is art. Can it be defined in any single painting, or sculpture. Is it even something that can be seen, or does it have to be experienced. The term "art" is so vague that it can be applied to almost anything, really. Mostly, however, art should be that which frees our imagination. It connects our conscious with our subconscious, putting into a visual form what we feel and think. It allows us to explore our inner self and fill that urge to understand our minds and our universe. Art helps us to see beyond the ordinary, to see what is in our hearts without being blinded by reality....   [tags: essays research papers]

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1158 words | (3.3 pages) | Preview

School Dress Codes v. The First Amendment

- America was founded on popular sovereignty and individual freedoms. What do Americans do when the freedoms given to them from birth are restricted or taken away from them. They fight. Throughout time the government has attempted to take away our civil liberties because they viewed them to be for the greater good. One huge government failure was the attempted prohibition of alcohol. It is well known that alcohol can be very dangerous and it should be restricted. However, the government went too far when it tried to take it away completely and just like their rebellious founders the American population just found ways around the law....   [tags: School Dress Codes v. Free Expression]

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Free Speech

- When you think about America, the first thing that comes to mind is liberty. Liberty of the government and its citizens is one thing that colonists exceedingly desired during the British oppressive regime. When United States gained independence, the Founding Fathers drafted the Constitution of the Unites States, a document that has been governing our country for more than 200 years. The constitution was drafted accordingly to ensure that people’s opinions were heard. What our Founding Fathers could not foresee is that in our 21st century, The Freedom of Speech not only gives a person such a massive power, but also an opinion even if it is immoral and goes against citizens’ values....   [tags: The First Amendment]

Term Papers
2199 words | (6.3 pages) | Preview

Bill of Rights

- Introduction The First Amendment of the United States Constitution: an amendment that guarantees three rights, one of which is the right to freedom of expression. Under this, there resides the freedom of press. It assures that people are free to communicate through the means of media and dissemination without governmental restraints. However, if the government desires to interfere in one’s expression, the government can do so, but only with proper justification. In such cases, a court case is necessary (“First Amendment”)....   [tags: first amendment, freedom, ]

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1043 words | (3 pages) | Preview

Analysis of The case of the Pledge of Allegiance

- The primary goal of this essay is to examine whether the first amendment goes too far in protecting free speech, like the case of the Pledge of Allegiance. Therefore, to establish this argument, this essay will first consider the speech overview, as well as the limitations. Subsequently, the essay would also put into consideration the aspects of Freedom in the Classroom. Basing my work on the “first amendment does not go too far in protecting free speech in the case of the Pledge of Allegiance” as the claim; my essay would revolve around the components of both the Speech Overview, as well as the Freedom in the Classroom....   [tags: first amendment, free speech, freedom]

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Controversial Relationship Between the Church and the State

- Decicco 1 In 1789, the First Amendment established that “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion…” This meant the Federal and State Governments could not be partial or show support for any certain denomination or religious organization. However, throughout the history of the United States the controversial question over the relationship between church and state has always been called into question in establishing a one religion government. The main focus of the inquiry is to decide whether to keep the establishment clause or to tear it down and move towards a theocratic system....   [tags: religion, political system, first amendment]

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2537 words | (7.2 pages) | Preview

Analysis of the Intellectual Manipulation of Ads

- Advertising as an influence, both negative and positive, on social constructs of body image has been the subject of debate about the responsibility ads have to their audience. Given that there are more effective means of protecting potential viewers from the negative aspects, ads, considered as art, should not have restrictions placed on them that would violate the advertisers' First Amendment rights. Opposition to loaded, modified, or invented human forms that suggest restraining advertisers' creative freedoms may overlook the alternatives....   [tags: advertising, body image, first amendment]

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841 words | (2.4 pages) | Preview

The Impact of Social Media in Modern Jobs

- How can social media websites get a person fired from their job. People get fired every day in the world we live in. People’s jobs can be terminated for many different reasons such as unbecoming behavior, misconduct, and stealing. The most recent new reason for termination from a job is due to social medial. A majority of people who are employed are given a code of conduct paper to sign and are expected to follow their employer’s rules and regulations. For example, if an on duty police officer in uniform came out of a convenient store with a case of beer they would be disciplined or terminated....   [tags: hippa, first amendment, unprofessional behavior]

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Did President Hoover Limit the First Amendment Rights of the Bonus Army?

- PROMPT: “Was President Herbert Hoover justified in limiting the 1st amendment rights of the Bonus Army?” --------------------- The question “Was President Herbert Hoover justified in limiting the 1st amendment rights of the Bonus Army?” is somewhat fallacious in that it attempts to enforce a viewpoint that Hoover did indeed limit the 1st amendment rights of the Bonus Army. The 1st amendment specifically guarantees “the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” It does not provide for violent protest, nor does it prevent the government from relocating people from public property....   [tags: constitution, american presidents]

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Curfews Should Be Eliminated

- “A society that will trade a little liberty for a little order will lose both, and deserve neither.” ~ Thomas Jefferson. This quote epitomizes my position that curfews should be eliminated. Liberty is a concept in political philosophy that means human beings are able to govern themselves and behave according to their own free will. Curfews ignore the idea of liberty and have not proven themselves as a successful tool against juvenile crime and yet are popularly utilized throughout the United States....   [tags: Curfews Violate First Amendment Rights]

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1316 words | (3.8 pages) | Preview

What the Classroom Needs

- Teaching students the theory of Evolution has been going on in classrooms for around a hundred years. For almost just as long, the war between Evolution and Intelligent Design has been going on (Bailey 63). Although Evolution is accepted by the majority of Americans, more people are beginning to accept the theory of Intelligent Design. A small number of scholars like Michael Behe and William Dembski are trying to disprove the theory of Evolution, while also trying to prove Intelligent Design as a legitimate scientific theory (Bailey 64)....   [tags: Evolution, Intelligent Design, First Amendment]

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1222 words | (3.5 pages) | Preview

Should Racist Speech Enjoy Protection under the First Amendment?

- Persuasive Speech - Should Racist Speech Enjoy Protection under the First Amendment. Prejudice and racial stereotyping are two of this country's greatest problems today. Many people in our society have tried to find ways to eliminate or at least limit these types of behavior, but have met with very limited, if any, success. Because of the complex nature of racism and racist acts, coupled with the fact the first amendment prohibits the government from limiting the publics' right to free expression and speech, the Federal government has been ineffective in eliminating racist actions that pervade our society....   [tags: essays research papers]

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1523 words | (4.4 pages) | Preview

Gregory Lee Johnson's Freedom Court Case

- The United States first amendment states, congress cannot pass a law prohibiting a citizen’s freedom of speech. In 1984, Gregory Lee Johnson burned an American flag to protest against Reagan during the republican national convention. He was arrested and charged with abuse of an item if the action were to provoke anger in others. Texas court tried and convicted Johnson, he appealed claiming that his behavior was protected by the first amendment. The Supreme Court agreed to hear his case. The issue was whether flag burning compromises emblematic speech secured by the first amendment....   [tags: free speech, first amendment, flag burning]

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880 words | (2.5 pages) | Preview

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