Your search returned 171 essays for "aphasia":
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Causes and Types of Aphasia Disorder

- Aphasia Aphasia is a disorder resulting from damage to the certain parts of the brain that deal with language. The areas of damage are typically called lesions. This disorder can lead to impairments in reading, writing, producing speech and the ability to understand speech. Aphasia typically takes place suddenly after a head injury or stroke, although, some cases can arise over time; a good example of this is when a brain tumor develops. “Aphasia affects about one million Americans -or 1 in 250 people- and is more common than Parkinson's Disease, cerebral palsy, or muscular dystrophy....   [tags: language therapy, aphasia, lesions, brain]

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Essay On Aphasia

- According to the National Aphasia Association, approximately two million people have Aphasia in the United States. Aphasia is a communication disorder that can make any, or all, aspects of communication difficult. More people should be educated about what aphasia is due to the sheer amount of people that have it and what it is. “Aphasia is a communication disorder that results from damage to the parts of the brain that contain language (typically in the left half of the brain).” (Aphasia) Aphasia can be caused by “…brain tumors, traumatic brain injury, and progressive neurological disorders.” (Aphasia) Not many people know what aphasia is even though “[m]ore people have aphasia t...   [tags: Traumatic brain injury, Aphasia, Stroke, Brain]

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Aphasia- Speech Disorders

- √ This week we went over speech disorders. Aphasia falls under the speech disorders category. There are two types of aphasia: Broca’s and Wernicke’s (Heilman, 2002, p. 11). √ There are many language symptoms of Broca’s aphasia. The difference between naming objects and using grammatical terms is a trademark of Broca’s apahsia. Mr. Ford was a patient that experienced this type of aphasia. This type of aphasia includes patterns of speech that mostly are made up of content words. Also people with this aphasia convey nouns in their singular form and their verbs in their most uncomplicated form....   [tags: Broca's Aphasia, Communication Disorders]

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Non Fluent Broca 's Aphasia

- Non-fluent Broca’s Aphasia is a neuropsychological condition characterized by damage to the left hemisphere of the brain, it caused primarily by lesions to Broadman’s areas 44 and 45 (Girard Lecture, 2015). Damage to the left hemisphere is associated with the inability to produce fluent speech; however, Broca’s aphasics can comprehension speech and intact vocal mechanisms (Elias and Saucier, 2006). Cognitively people non-fluent Broca’s aphasia often fail to use functioning words, such as pronouns, conjunctions, and prepositions when producing speech; this causes the patient to slowly produce somewhat comprehensible sentences (Elias and Saucier, 2006)....   [tags: Aphasia, Language, Temporal lobe, Psychology]

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Examining for Aphasia

- Introduction Examining For Aphasia was created in 1954 by John Eisenson in New York (Eisenson, 1954). It was one of the first tests for assessing language impairment (Benson & Ardila, 1996) and provides a guided approach for evaluating language disturbances and other disturbances closely related to language function (Eisenson, 1954). The materials and procedures were developed originally for use with a group of patients in an army hospital who had aphasia and related disturbances (Eisenson, 1954, p....   [tags: Language ]

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Examining for Aphasia

- Introduction Examining For Aphasia was created in 1954 by John Eisenson in New York (Eisenson, 1954). It was one of the first tests for assessing language impairment (Benson & Ardila, 1996) and provides a guided approach for evaluating language disturbances and other disturbances closely related to language function (Eisenson, 1954). The test was originally developed for use with a group of patients in an army hospital who had aphasia and other related disturbances. Over time, the original inventory was refined and improved until testing has ‘shown the applicability of various parts of the test as well as of the examination as a whole’ (Eisenson, 1954, p....   [tags: Assessment ]

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Caregiver Burden of Individuals with Aphasia

- 1.0 INTRODUCTION Aphasia is an acquired communication disorder which involves damage to the parts of brain that contain language (American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, ASHA, 2013). It disrupts communication and can cause deterioration of a person’s coping potential and quality of life (Parr, 2001) Statistics from United States indicated around 25-40% of stroke survivors develop aphasia (National Association of Aphasia, NAA, 2013). Aphasia affects the ability to produce or comprehend spoken and written language, while intelligence is left intact (NAA, 2013)....   [tags: acquired communication disorder]

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Aphasia: A Mental Disease

- There are many mental diseases in the world. In this paper we will be talking about a mental disease called Aphasia. We will explore what Aphasia is. We will find out how someone is diagnosed with Aphasia. We will learn the different types and treatments for this type of mental disease. What is Aphasia. Aphasia is present when the patient knoes what he or she wants to say but cannot pronounce it. The patient with sensory aphasia has difficulty understanding language and may articulate words easily but use them inappropriately....   [tags: Speech, Neurology, Brain]

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Taking a Look at Aphasia

- Aphasia, commonly a result of prevalent strokes, is a language disorder that predominantly affects expressive and receptive communication in adults. The main motivation of Kurland, Pulvermüller, Silva, Burke and Andrianopoulos was to understand what treatments would be most beneficial for individuals with various types of aphasia and utilize effects seen in neurological imaging as a way to categorize types of aphasia based on various neurological lesion affects (2012). A variety of literature is referenced to explain constraint induced aphasia therapy (CIAT), the method that was explored in this current study....   [tags: language disorders in adults]

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Bilingual Aphasia with Parallel Recovery

- Bilingualism has been commonly used in scientific and common nomenclature to refer to the knowledge and/or use of two languages, though the specifics of the definition have been widely debated (e.g. Altarriba & Heredia, 2008; De Groot & Kroll, 1997; Grosjean, 2010). In fact, one half (Grosjean, 2010) to two-thirds (Walraff, 2000) of all people in the world have been estimated to routinely use more than one language in everyday communicative contexts. Given this global linguistic profile, it has been suggested that an increasing number of people with communication difficulties post-brain injury are likely to be bilingual (Ansaldo, Marchotte, Scherer, & Raboyeau, 2008; Centeno, 2009)....   [tags: Linguistics]

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Your search returned 171 essays for "aphasia":
1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9   …  18    Next >>