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Analysis Of Walt Whitman 's ' Song Of Myself

- Walt Whitman is considered the foremost poet of American democracy of his time. Not only did he fully embrace it, but he believed that American democracy was more than a political system, but a way of life (Casale 48). Many of his personal experiences influenced his deep democratic point of view (48). As a volunteer at an army hospital during the American Civil War, he saw many die and became increasingly grateful for the opportunities provided by the American government (Mirsky). Later, as he was residing in New York City, Whitman witnessed America face urbanization....   [tags: Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass, Song of Myself]

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Walt Whitman's Song of Myself

- In one of the sections from the poem, “Song of Myself” Walt Whitman starts out with a child asking a question, “What is the grass?” Grass is a symbol of life. God, who created both the heavens and the earth also gave birth to life. When Whitman refers to grass as a “handkerchief of the Lord” (7), as a gift. When people look at the grass, they do not think of it as a creation but rather just a plant. Whitman refers to the grass as “a child, the produced babe of vegetation” (11, 12). Here, the grass is a metaphor for the birth of a child....   [tags: Song of Myself Essays]

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Song of Myself by Walt Whitman

- In his first anthology of poems entitled “Song of Myself”, Walt Whitman reveals some of his views on democracy through the use of symbolism and free verse poetry. His use of symbolism and free verse poetry creates indeterminacy, giving the reader hints rather than answers about the nature of the poem. In the sixth part of “Song of Myself”, a child asks the narrator of the poem, “What is the grass?” (Whitman). Instead of simply giving an answer, the narrator cannot make up his mind, and stumbles on how to explain the grass to the child....   [tags: Song of Myself Essays]

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Song Of Myself By Walt Whitman

- ... This engages the audience as well, because if they know one kind of person that the poem is describing, they can make a personal connection with the poem and are more likely to relate to the poem because of it. Considering the definitions of tradition and culture and how the poem captures them, “Song of Myself” is the closest thing that America can have to an epic. It describes American traditions, and in doing so it paints a picture of the American culture and its ideals. Therefore, it creates an American identity by including everyone who participates in these traditions and subscribes to the American culture....   [tags: United States, Walt Whitman, American Civil War]

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Choosing Sides in Walt Whitman's Song of Myself

- “Song of Myself” is an attempt by Walt Whitman to become the “American poet” as described by Ralph Waldo Emerson; he attempts to be “[T]he sayer, the namer, and [representative] of beauty” (Emerson 1182). Whitman wants to speak to and for America. Whitman does not explicitly choose sides on the slavery debate that was raging at the time of his writing, but he does express the equality of all people, regardless of gender and race in “Song of Myself”. While Whitman’s writing can be read as neutral but “Song of Myself” is, in reality, very anti-slavery and pro-equality....   [tags: Song of Myself Essays]

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Individuality in Whitman's Song of Myself

- Individuality in Whitman's Song of Myself During a lecture in 1907, William James said "the philosophy which is so important in each of us is not a technical matter; it is our more or less dumb sense of what life honestly means. It is only partly got from books; it is our individual way of just seeing and feeling the total push and pressure of the cosmos" (Bartlett 546) Individuality has been a prevalent theme in every type of literature for quite some time. Whether it is a character discovering his/her individuality or the author expressing his, literature is full of distinctness....   [tags: Song of Myself Essays]

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Walt Whitman's Song of Myself

- Walt Whitman's "Song of Myself" Walt Whitman's 'Song of Myself' is, on the most basic descriptive level, a really long poem. Whitman is clearly a poet with a lot to say, or at least with a lot of different ways to say it. He meanders from the micro to the macro, from atoms to the whole earth. There are obviously myriad ways to explain what the poem is about, and myriad 'keys' to its true meaning. In what became Section 6 of the final edition (lines 90-121 of the 1855 edition ) Whitman himself addresses this sort of 'meta-question' of interpretation....   [tags: Song of Myself Essays]

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Walt Whitman's Song of Myself

- Walt Whitman's Song of Myself This paper deals with Walt Whitman's "Song of Myself" in relation to Julia Kristeva's theories of abjection--my paper does not point to abjection in the text, but rather the significance of the abscence of abjection. This abscence, looming and revolting, arises from Whitman's attemt to refigure a conception of sublimity which delimits the material which can trigger the sublime moment. Whitman's democracy of the sublime is inclusive of those figures on the American landscape, their lives and voices, which are functionalized into his world....   [tags: Song of Myself Essays]

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Whitman's Song of Myself and The Nature of Life

- Whitman's Song of Myself and The Nature of Life Identifying the mystery of existence, Whitman writes "Song of Myself," section six to question the nature of the life of man. He alludes to and confronts past answers to this query by utilizing as his central image the leaves of grass. In the Christian tradition, the Bible utilizes this image of grass to describe the lives of men. Isaiah, a prophet of God cries out, "All men are like grass . . . and all their glory is like the flowers of the field....   [tags: Song of Myself Essays]

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An Analysis of Walt Whitman's Song of Myself

- An Analysis of Walt Whitman's Song of Myself `Whitman was always asking questions. He believed that life's goal or cause was a mystery. He was surrounded by people who were drawing distinct lines between right and wrong, rejecting the things in the universe that were not a direct ticket to holiness. Whitman, unlike his contemporaries, embraced the beauty of everything. His mystical perception of the world ushered in the idea that God was to be found in every thing, and that He could never be fully understood....   [tags: Song of Myself Essays]

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Philosophic Thought in Whitman's Song of Myself

-      The Heath Anthology of American Literature repeatedly refers to Walt Whitman and his poetry in terms of being American, yet as I read Song of Myself, my thoughts are continually drawn to the philosophies and religions of the Far East. Like the Tao Te Ching ideas are expressed in enigmatic verse and each stanza is a Zen koan waiting to be meditated on and puzzled out. Even Emerson called Whitman's poetry "a remarkable mixture of the Bhagvat Gita and the New York Herald" ("The Whitman Project")....   [tags: Song of Myself Essays]

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Analysis Of Walt Whitman 's Song Of Myself

- One of the most popular American poets is Walt Whitman. Whitman’s poetry has become a rallying cry for Americans, asking for individuality, self-approval, and even equality. While this poetry seems to be truly groundbreaking, which it objectively was, Whitman was influenced by the writings of others. While Whitman may not have believed in this connection to previous authors, critics have linked him to Emerson, Poe, and even Carlyle. However, many critics have ignored the connection between Walt Whitman and the English writer William Wordsworth....   [tags: Walt Whitman, Poetry, Romanticism, Romantic poetry]

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An Annotation of Section 24 of Walt Whitman's Song of Myself

- An Annotation of Section 24 of Walt Whitman's Song of Myself Walt Whitman's "Song of Myself" is a vision of the American spirit, a vision of Whitman himself. It is his cry for democracy, giving each of us a voice through his poetry. Each of us has a voice and desires, and this is Whitman's representation of our voices, the voice of America. America, the great melting pot, was founded for freedom and democracy, and this poem is his way of re-instilling these lost American ideals. In this passage from "Song of Myself" Whitman speaks through his fellow man and speaks for his fellow man when his voice is not socially acceptable to be heard....   [tags: Song of Myself Essays]

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Defining the Soul in Walt Whitman's Song of Myself

- Every sentence in Walt Whitman's "Song of Myself" tends to either repeat or contradict. He even says of himself, "I contradict myself" (Lauter, p. 2793). This can make Whitman's poetry a little confusing to some. In his many stanzas, definition of the soul is ambiguous and somewhat contradictory. Whitman says, "Clear and sweet is my soul....and clear and sweet is all that is not my soul" (Lauter, p. 2745). What I believe Whitman is saying here is that his soul and everything else that is not his soul, including the souls of others, is clear and sweet....   [tags: Song of Myself Essays]

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References to Homosexuality in Walt Whitman's Song of Myself

- References to Homosexuality in Walt Whitman's Song of Myself "WHITMAN WAS MORE MAN THAN YOU'LL EVER BE," said a student of Louisiana State University. When asked questions of your sexual preference or thoughts on the issue of sex, I would venture to say it makes most people uncomfortable. This is an age-old topic that people know about, yet do not want to talk about. He was particularly reticent about his issues regarding sex and his particular sexual preference. In fact, of Whitman's struggles the most difficult for him to deal with was his ever so strong homosexual desires (Hubbell 283)....   [tags: Song of Myself Essays]

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Nature and Death in Walt Whitman's Song of Myself

- There are many "popular" topics used frequently by authors. Love, religion, and war are some favorites. Two other such topics we typically read about are nature and death. The two can be discussed separately or they can be related to each other. Walt Whitman, a lover of nature, tackled these subjects in "Song of Myself" from Leaves of Grass. Another author who does the same is William Cullen Bryant. Though two very different writers with different styles, they share some of the same ideas. "Song of Myself" is a celebration of life and God....   [tags: Song of Myself Essays]

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The Meaning of Life in Walt Whitman's Song of Myself

- The Meaning of Life in Walt Whitman's Song of Myself Our culture seems to be fascinated by the unknown and specifically that which pertains to things of an eternal nature such as Heaven, angels, God and the meaning of forever. These things cause us to think about what we can't see and even allow us to engage ourselves in questioning the meaning behind our existence and what our purpose is here on earth. Some of these may be humorous and take on the realities of human nature while others stir something inside ourselves that cause us to take a deeper look at life....   [tags: Song of Myself Essays]

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The Cycle of Life in Walt Whitman's Song of Myself

- The Cycle of Life in Walt Whitman's Song of Myself In stanza six of the poem "Song of Myself", by Walt Whitman, he poses the question "What is the grass?" I believe that grass is a metaphor for the cycle of life. Throughout the poem Whitman points out images that grass could represent. All of these images stem from the life and death that we come to expect in our lifetime. During your life you will experience death, it at times surrounds you, but if you look past the grief and look to the beauty you will see that it is a cycle that keeps our world in balance....   [tags: Song of Myself Essays]

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Visualizing Eternity in Walt Whitman's Song of Myself

- Visualizing Eternity in Walt Whitman's Song of Myself Whitman's poem "Song of Myself #44" stands as a confession and testaments of not only who he is and what he is, but also as who we are, we being people in general. The poem is not about a self-idolizing author claiming to be the greatest being of all time. Instead it paints a picture for all mankind alike to relate to. It puts a mirror in front of the world and presents an angle of an image that, though familiar, we have never seen or realized before....   [tags: Song of Myself Essays]

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Analysis Of Walt Whitman 's Poem ' Song Of Myself

- ... He believes the world is wonderful and has meaning. The writer began envisioning himself as a prophet when he was in the civil war seeing people die. Later, Whitman’s brother got ill and his mother died shortly afterward. The author’s awareness of his connection with God appears out of his personal belief that it is imaginable to attain intimacy through meditation and love. In fact, it is a way to achieve the wisdom of divine reality. Walt Whitman showed his priesthood vocation in responding to the call of the needy, the depressed, and the oppressed....   [tags: Religion, Faith, Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass]

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Divinity, Sexuality and the Self in Whitman’s Song of Myself

- Divinity, Sexuality and the Self in Whitman’s Song of Myself Through his poetry, Whitman's "Song of Myself" makes the soul sensual and makes divine the flesh. In Whitman's time, the dichotomy between the soul and the body had been clearly defined by centuries of Western philosophy and theology. Today, the goodness of the soul and the badness of the flesh still remain a significant notion in contemporary thought. Even Whitman's literary predecessor, Emerson, chose to distinctly differentiate the soul from all nature....   [tags: Song of Myself Essays]

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Analysis Of Walt Whitman 's ' Song Of Myself

- Darian Williams American Literature II Ms. Dalton July 3, 2016 Analysis Walt Whitman was a very influential poet in his time era. He was very in tune with the world, his surroundings and people which makes him a humanist of his time. The poem Song of Myself has very mystical and profound ideas in this poem in my opinion. It is the type of poem when you read once and read over and over again you will always find something new about it for years to come because it 's so intriguing. Whitman was somebody who was very struck by his experience in the civil war and his thoughts about the world which transferred into his writing....   [tags: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass]

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Individuality And Free Verse in Walt Whitman's Song of Myself

- Forged in the fire of revolution and defined by manifest destiny, America has always been the land of the individual. Although the American dream has not always been consistent, (married with 2.5 kids, 2 cars, a dog and a satisfying job), the spirit of innovation, individuality and progress remains unchanged. The father of free verse, and perhaps the American perspective of poetry, Walt Whitman embodies these values in his life and work. First published in 1855 in Leaves of Grass, "Song of Myself" is a vision of a symbolic "I" enraptured by the senses, vicariously embracing all people and places from the Atlantic to the Pacific oceans....   [tags: Song of Myself Essays]

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Poetic Tools Describe Life in Walt Whitman's Song of Myself

- Poetic Tools Describe Life in Walt Whitman's Song of Myself Walt Whitman is commonly known as the bard of America, a poet who wrote about the common man of the country as had never been done before. He was able to do so because he was a common man, as can be seen in lines such as "This is the city and I am one of the citizens." Within his poetry he often used certain tools of the typical epic tale, borrowed from such tales as The Iliad, and The Odyssey. All of these tools can be seen within the lines of his lengthy poem of fifty-two sections "Song of Myself." The first of these tools include an invocation of the muse, as can be seen in the lines "I loafe and invite my soul," which appear...   [tags: Song of Myself Essays]

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Identities and Transcendentalism in Song of Myself by Walt Whitman

- Identities and Transcendentalism in Song of Myself While reading through the poem Song of Myself by Walt Whitman, what comes to your mind. His deep love for nature. The use of symbolism throughout the poem. Whitman’s questionable homoeroticism that seeps its way throughout the lines. What came to the forefront of mind when reading this poem by Whitman was his deliberately obvious theme of individuality while also maintaining a universal identity. I also think that Whitman throws in a common underlying theme of transcendentalism throughout his poem....   [tags: Individuality, Poem]

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A Comparison of Whitman’s Song of Myself with Ginsberg’s Howl

- American poetry, unlike other nations’ poetry, is still in the nascent stage because of the absence of a history in comparison to other nations’ poetry humming with matured voices. Nevertheless, in the past century, American poetry has received the recognition it deserves from the creative poetic compositions of Walt Whitman, who has been called “the father of American poetry.” His dynamic style and uncommon content is well exhibited in his famous poem “Song of Myself,” giving a direction to the American writers of posterity....   [tags: Compare Contrast Essays]

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Walt Whitman 's Song Of Myself And I Sing The Body Electric

- ... in Bloom, 23). In Whitman’s opinion, the inner connection of the body and the soul, deeper connections between humans could be established as well, because, according to him, “...nothing, not God, is greater to one than one’s-self is/ and whoever walks a furlong without sympathy walks to his own/ funeral, dressed in his own shroud... In the faces of men and women I see God, and in my own face in/the glass” (1263-1265, 1279-1280). Whitman also empathizes that the physical body is something that should be considered good....   [tags: Human sexual behavior, Human sexuality]

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Walt Whitman’s Song of Myself and Alice Fulton’s You Can’t Rhumboogie in a Ball and Chain

- Walt Whitman’s Song of Myself and Alice Fulton’s You Can’t Rhumboogie in a Ball and Chain When I read poetry, I often tend to look first at its meaning and second at how it is written, or its form. The mistake I make when I do this is in assuming that the two are separate, when, in fact, often the meaning of poetry is supported or even defined by its form. I will discuss two poems that embody this close connection between meaning and form in their central use of imagery and repetition. One is a tribute to Janis Joplin, written in 1983 by Alice Fulton, entitled “You Can’t Rhumboogie in a Ball and Chain.” The second is a section from Walt Whitman’s 1,336-line masterpiece, “Song of Myself,”...   [tags: Comparison Compare Contrast Essays]

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Analysis Of The Poem ' Song Of Myself

- American poet Walt Whitman takes his self-appointed role as “American bard” very seriously. Whitman proclaims he will simply show the true America in its natural form and nothing more. His poem Song of Myself is truly a song of America. He examines the sheer volume of America while emphasizing the importance of nature in American culture. He reflects growing sentiment against the Fugitive Slave Act, a divider of peoples, and reminds readers that self-reliance is an important quality. The poem overall seeks to mirror America and its people, all while discussing cultural values....   [tags: Walt Whitman, United States]

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The Texture of the Sixth Poem of Song of Myself

- The Texture of the Sixth Poem of Song of Myself In number six of Whitman's poetic series "Song of Myself," it seems that he is trying to convey the point that to die is not what people make it out to be. Whitman throughout many of the poems in this series, describes death as "lucky" and beneficial. He also explains how death leads to the beginning of life in this poem. The tone at the very beginning of this poem seems a bit youthful. Especially when the question "What is grass?" is posed to him by a child....   [tags: Song of Myself Essays]

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Song of Myself by Walt Whitmas

- Most people awake to a daily routine, in which they keep eyes dazed staring at the pavement they walk on yet so easily ignore. Usually, these same people go about their business with no more than a passing glance towards their fellow man. However, there is an enigmatic few that are more than mere pawns in the game of existence. They are passionate spectators who take in their surroundings with every sense. They rejoice in the vastness of the electric crowd and become one with it. By all means, these few can be called ‘idle city men’ or, according to Charles Baudelaire’s 1863 essay “The Painter of Modern Life”, they are flâneurs....   [tags: American Flaneur, painter of modern life]

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Comparing The Battle Whitman And Post War Whitman

- Comparison of pre-war Whitman and post-war Whitman Walt Whitman is considered one of the famous American writers who lived in the 19th century. The author is primarily known for his poetry, and also best known for his masterpiece, Leaves of Grass, which was published in 1855 as a collection of 12 poems. Whitman’s poems were different from those written during the era, and this is because they had a unique style, as well as a concentration of commonplace subjects. The use of commonplace subjects led to many people calling the author the “poet of democracy.” This paper compares Pre-war Whitman and Post-war Whitman....   [tags: Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass, Poetry]

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Walt Whitman And His Work

- Walt Whitman, born in May of 1819, grew up with an affinity for America. Originally from Long Island, New York, Whitman moved to Brooklyn as a child in hopes that his father would find work in the city. However, when that did not happen, his father took Walt out of school in order for him to work and bring in an extra income. Whitman began his working career at age eleven by working in one of Brooklyn’s attorney offices. Shortly afterwards, he began getting involved in the printing business and fell in love with it....   [tags: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Walt Whitman]

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Similarities Between Whitman And Dickinson

- Whitman and Dickinson share a lot of things in common, such as both supporting transcendentalism, although they share a lot of differences not just through their writing, but also the way they grew up. Whitman and Dickinson had a different understanding of the world, because of how the world was seen through their eyes. For example, Whitman was able to do more things in the world rather than Dickinson, because of the way Dickinson was raised. Dickinson was restricted to her own home for almost all of her life, which limits her views on how the world really is....   [tags: Writing, Writing process, Walt Whitman]

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Ralph Emerson And Walt Whitman

- ... The religions of the world are the ejaculations of a few imaginative men” (The Poet, Emerson, Ralph Waldo, pg. 578). Emerson was trying to say that the writer needed to use the nature around him as way of presenting and explaining his ideas and thoughts through the written word. Emerson explained what nature meant to the true artist and why nature was important to be a great writer through the quote, “Too feeble fall the impressions of nature on us to make us artists. Every touch should thrill....   [tags: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Walt Whitman]

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Ginsberg's Affinities with Whitman

- Although a century apart, Allen Ginsberg and Walt Whitman share similar cultural, political and moral values, which they express in their literary work. Whitman's writing is considered controversial for the 1800’s. He sets the stage for generations to come breaking way from the strict Victorian poetic tradition by writing in free verse. Ginsberg follows his footsteps, when composing “Howl" by writing in long prose like lines and subdividing the poem into several parts. Likewise, he uses numerous repetitions to achieve rhythmicity of his verse....   [tags: Allen Ginsberg, Walt Whitman, values]

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Whitman's Interpretation of Emerson

- Whitman's Interpretation of Emerson Walt Whitman was able to take the spark of an idea from Ralph Waldo Emerson and tend, nurture, and support it until the spark grew into a huge flame of something surprising and original - new American poetry. Whitman did not only learn from Emerson, but he also took Emerson's ideas and expanded them into something much more encompassing. Whitman was able to use Emerson's principles that are outlined in "The Poet" to springboard into something more expansive than Emerson was able to describe or create....   [tags: Whitman Emerson Poet Poem Essays]

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Whitman's Leaves of Grass: Democratic Themes

- Leaves of Grass: Democratic Themes When I Heard the Learn’d Astronomer I Hear America Singing In his Preface to Leaves of Grass, Whitman states, “The United States themselves are essentially the greatest poem”. Whitman was the ultimate Transcendentalist/ Romantic. He united democratic themes and subject matter with free verse form. In Leaves of Grass, Whitman celebrates unity of all life and people. He embraces diversity of geography, culture, work, sexuality, and beliefs. Whitman’s impact solidifies American dreams of independence, freedom, and fulfillment, and transforms them for larger spiritual meaning....   [tags: Leaves of Grass Whitman]

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Analysis Of The Article ' Walt Whitman 's Different Lights `` By Robert Martin

- “Song of Myself,” Whitman’s great lyric poem, exemplifies his democratic ideals without diminishing the intense feeling of a real world. Walt Whitman had some radical ideas about America, democracy, spirituality, sexuality, nature and identity. He used “Song of Myself” to explore those ideas while preaching self-knowledge, liberty and acceptance for all. Above all, “Song of Myself” is a poem of incessant motion. Whitman is opposed to self-righteous judgments and feelings of guilt and shame about the body....   [tags: Democracy, United States, Walt Whitman, Life]

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American Influences of Walt Whitman

- American Influences of Walt Whitman In his poems and life, Walt Whitman celebrated the human spirit and the human body. He sang the praises of democracy and marveled at the technological advances of his era. His direct poetic style shocked many of his contemporaries. This style, for which Whitman is famous, is in direct relation to several major American cultural developments. The development of American dictionaries, the growth of baseball, the evolution of Native American policy, and the development of photography all played a part and became essential components of Whitman’s poetry....   [tags: Walt Whitman Writers Poems Poetry Essays]

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Crossing Brooklyn Ferry by Walt Whitman

- Through the use of simple diction, Whitman is able to traverse both time and distance and connect with his readers as so few other poets can. His mastery of verbiage draws readers into the poem, as few other poets can. In “Crossing Brooklyn Ferry,” Whitman creates a vignette into the Brooklyn of the past, and he connects it to the present, though in surprising ways. The omnipresence of Whitman allows the reader to envision themselves into the settings he created- and to interpret them into modern language....   [tags: Crossing Brooklyn Ferry, Walt Whitman ]

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Whitman's Music as a Means of Expression

- Whitman's Music as a Means of Expression In his verses, Walt Whitman eradicates divisions of individual entities while simultaneously celebrating their unique characteristics. All components of the universe are united in a metaphysical intercourse, and yet, are assigned very distinct qualities so as to keep their identities intact. Often times, Whitman demonstrates these conceptions through elements of song. “Walt Whitman caroled throughout his verse. For the Bard of Democracy, as America came to call our great poet, music was a central metaphor in his life and work, both as a mindset and as a practical reality.” (Hampson) His musical poetry lyrically encompasses themes of social equality...   [tags: Whitman Music Musical Essays]

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Walt Whitman as a Voice for the People

- Walt Whitman as a Voice for the People "The proof of a poet is that his country absorbs him as much as he absorbs his country." This brilliant quote from Walt Whitman thus ends his preface to Leaves of Grass, and thereafter begins the poem "Song of Myself." To many, upon their first reading, this was a crude, shocking and distasteful piece of work. but to me...this was a celebration of life. And not just a celebration of his own life, but of every life, of the American life. Walt Whitman is the "voice of the people" and this I believe because, while he did write of things that were not seen as aesthetically beautiful by many...including homosexuality, loneliness, and death....   [tags: Walt Whitman Essays]

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Song of the Open Road by Walt Whitman

- Classic journalist and poet, Walt Whitman was born on May 31, 1819 in West Hills, New York. His family financial background was of a meek proportion in comparison to its large size. Whitman’s commitment to the family catapulted him into employment at a very young age depriving him of a formal education in his adolescent years. The absence of a formal education was not a hindrance for the young Whitman; his self-education through reading and exploration of the written word eventually led him to his first teaching post at the very young age of seventeen, an unacceptable happening in todays 21st century....   [tags: Melodic Notes, Poetic Analysis, Literature]

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Walt Whitman: The American Poet

- Walt Whitman was arguable one of the most influential poets during the Civil War era. Though never directly involved in war, Whitman was able to talk about the war in a more insightful way than many poets at the time could. Whitman was most active in writing during the times before and after the war, choosing to dedicate himself to helping wounded soldiers during the war instead. Walt Whitman’s poetry reflects the progression of his philosophy of America: his initial view of America was uplifting, represented in his Pre-Civil war poems and while the Civil War poetry presents the degradation of American society, Whitman’s final poetry returns to a realistic, optimistic view for America....   [tags: American Literature ]

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The American Soldier and Walt Whitman

- F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel The Great Gatsby sings the dirge of the illusions of the New World. The narrator Nick Carraway migrates from the American Midwest to New York to create a new life for himself; a life of prosperity, of happiness, and of independence. In other words, he moves to attain the American Dream. However, after observing the recklessness, the superficiality, the materialism, and the vice of those already living in New York, Nick realizes that the dream had been twisted into an ugly form....   [tags: Poetry, War, Poems]

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Whitman

- Biography. Born on May 31st 1819, died March 26th 1892. Born into a working class family, ended his formal education at age 11, would later say that most of his meaningful education came from outside the school house. Had apprenticeships at working-class newspapers also started his own newspaper, The Long Islander, though it later failed. Whitman's most famous work is the collection of Leaves of Grass, first published in 1955 at his own expense. In total there were 9 editions each addressing the citizens of the United States, urging them to be large and generous, a new race nurtured in political liberty, and possessed of united souls and bodies published during Whitman's life with each havin...   [tags: Biography]

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Walt Whitman: Poetic Realist

- Walt Whitman – Poetic Realist Walt Whitman, one of the great American poets of the 19th and 20th centuries, was inspired to further his passion and talent for writing by what some would refer to as a call to action, by the writer Ralph Waldo Emerson. Emerson, known in his time as an “American Transcendentalist” writer, called poets of the mid 1800s into action with his essay entitled: “The Poet.” The fact that Walt Whitman, considered a realist poet, was inspired in part by this transcendentalist perfectly illustrates the constant progression of literary styles of that time....   [tags: transcendentalism, poetic analysis]

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Walter Whitman

- Walter Whitman “I believe a leaf of grass is no less than the journey-work of the stars” (Whitman 41). Walter Whitman, also known as Walt Whitman, was born on May 31, 1819, in Long Island, New York, to Walter Whitman and Louisa Van Velsor Whitman. When he was twelve, Walt and his family settled in Brooklyn, up to then his family had lived in a dozen different places (Conarroe 4). Walt worked in many different positions; to some he was even viewed as a drifter. Walt was many different things; he worked as a carpenter and home builder, like his father, and apprentice printer, a school teacher, editor of several newspapers, including Brooklyn’s Daily Eagle, journalist, and writer....   [tags: Biography]

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The Comparisson Between Edna Pontellier Character and a Poem

- The Awakening In The Awakening, Edna Pontellier is a selfish character. She wishes to live her life the way she wants without anyone interfering. She did not start selfish, but grew selfish as her hidden desires were awakened. Her selfishness comes from her complete disregard for anyone’s happiness besides her own. Edna refuses to attend her sister’s wedding, describing the event as lamentable. Even if Edna did not want to attend, a wedding is for the bride and groom’s happiness. She is unable to compromise any of her own desires for the happiness of others....   [tags: Mark Twain, the awakening, song of myself]

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Comparing the Works of Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman

- In both Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman’s works, they emphasize some differences in their writing. In Dickinson’s works she shows that her works are short and simple poems, while Whitman’s poems and often long and complex. With Dickinson showing that her works are short and simple, while Whitman brings on a more sophisticated style, it truly shows that they use their own unique style of writing. In both Whitman and Dickinson works they have been known for being such unique artist and being original, while people try so hardly to impersonate their style, but they are unable to come close to accomplishing it....   [tags: poetry analysis, notorious American poets]

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Emerson and Whitman's Views of Self

- Emerson and Whitman's Views of Self "What is man anyhow. What am I. What are you?" asks Whitman. Who we are, what our purpose is and what the meaning of life is are all mysteries that man has tried to solve from his earliest history. Whitman and Emerson explore these ideas in their works, Song of Myself and Self Reliance. Whitman, an American poet, and Emerson, an American philosopher, take different approaches in their search for self-discovery, yet within their solutions, many parallels can be found....   [tags: Papers]

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Whitman

- Very few people will contest that Walt Whitman may be one of the most important and influential writers in American literary history and conceivably the single most influential poet. However many have claimed that Whitman’s writing is so free form as evident in his 1855 Preface to Leaves of Grass and Song of Myself that it has no style. The poetic structures he employs are unconventional but reflect his very democratic ideals towards America. Although Whitman’s writing does not include a structure that can be easily outlined, masterfully his writing conforms itself to no style, other then its own universal and unrestricted technique....   [tags: essays research papers]

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walt whitman

- Walt Whitman Walt Whitman was a follower of the two Transcendentalist Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau. He believed in Emerson and Thoreau’s Trascendentalist beliefs. Whitman believed that individualism stems from listening to one’s inner voice and that one’s life is guided by one’s intuition. The Transcendentalist centered on the divinity of each individual; but this divinity could be self-discovered only if the person had the independence of mind to do so. Whitman lent himself to this concept of independence....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Walt Whitman's Transition

- Walt Whitman's Transition In any medium of art that is personal to the artist, a change in the artwork can represent a change in the artist. During a period of depression a musician may write heavier, less upbeat music, or a painter may shift to darker tones and more downcast themes. The medium of poetry certainly has the power to reflect the writer's moods and mental state, and the poetry of Walt Whitman's demonstrates this power. A comparison of "Song of Myself," one of Whitman's earlier poems, and "As I Ebb'd With the Ocean of Life," a poem from later in his career, reveals a great change in Whitman from a man of confidence and optimism to one of dissatisfaction and self-doubt....   [tags: Papers]

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Emerson, Melville and Whitman

- The way I view the world has been greatly affected by my reading this semester. Thought I had read Emerson and Melville before, I never before was able to sound the depths of their work and fully appreciate it. This semester was my first real exposure to Whitman, as well. The best analogy for my new outlook is an image of the universe as a yin-yang; it is a complete, unbroken whole within which two polar opposites are constantly in conflict. But more significantly I have taken to heart the doctrine of "Self-Reliance," which is one shared by all three authors....   [tags: Free Essay Writer]

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Walt Whitman

- Walt Whitman was looked upon as the forerunner of 20th Century poetry, praising democracy, and becoming a proclaimed poet of American democracy. He was known as the "Son of Long Island," and he loved his country and everything about it. (Current, Williams, Freidel- page 292-293). Whitman lived during the time of the Civil War; a fact that increased his patriotism. Whitman was considered one of the most important American Poets of the 19th Century. (Encyclopedia of World Biography- page 249)....   [tags: essays research papers fc]

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Walt Whitman

- Mysticism, Democracy, Individuality&Personality The 1881 publication of the Leaves of Grass contained more than twenty-four poems, which were reasonably filled with ten or more diversified types of themes. Walt Whitman the author and compiler of this exceptional work changed the status of poetry writing through his utilization of thought and expression in the publication of the Leaves of Grass. Ralph Waldo Emerson, a collogue and admirer of Walt once spoke this of him '…Whitman, that Sir, is a strange case, a case unknown to any of us, unless we should stumble upon him at church one day…';(Chase 142)....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Walt Whitman's Writings

- 1. "Apart from the pulling and hauling stands what I am, stands amused, complacent, compassionating, idle, unitary… (Whitman 38) ." This line expresses Walt Whitman's philosophy on life and is an almost perfect description of the poet. He was a man, who in his poetry, expressed independence, interdependence with other living things, and the struggles that are dealt with by him and others in order to gain that independence. He felt and wrote that it is important to stand up for the things in which one believes in....   [tags: Papers]

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Comparing Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson

- Comparing Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson During the time in American history known as the, several poets began to stray from the traditional methods of writing poetry. Among these poets were Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson. While these writer's led drastically different lifestyles and had drastically different styles of writing, the messages they presented through their writing were often surprisingly similar. Whitman's poem "Song of Myself, No.6" and Dickinson's poem "This quiet Dust was Gentlemen and Ladies" are examples of pieces which, on the surface, appear completely different, but in fact contain several similarities....   [tags: Papers]

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Death, a Theme in Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman´s Poetry

- Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson’s poetry is very different; however death seems to be a familiar topic amongst both poets. Opposites attract, and you could say the same for Whitman and Dickinson because though they have different writing styles both repeatedly write about death. Once more, although both Whitman and Dickinson have many different feelings about death, they also share many similar feelings about it as well. Although Walt Whitman's poetry is rather long and quite simple and Emily Dickinson's are often short and complex, the theme of death strongly ties their works together....   [tags: Literature, Opposite]

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Walt Whitman: An Omnisexual Poet

- The homosexual themes displayed in Walt Whitman’s works, especially in his most famous collection of poems Leaves of Grass, raise the question of his own sexuality. Many of his poems depicted affection and sexuality in a simple, personal manner, causing nineteenth century Americans to view them as pornographic and obscene. Based on this poetry, Whitman is usually assumed to be homosexual, or at least bisexual. However, this assumption does not account for major influences of his writing such as the shift from transcendentalism to realism and the American Civil War....   [tags: Leaves of Grass, homosexual, bisexual]

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Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman: Dissimilar Poets Establish Unique Writing Style

- Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman both were American poets who lived in the 19th century who strayed from the traditional style of writing poetry and formed their own individual style of writing which became the unique American style of poetry. Their lifestyles and writing styles were extremely different, as they shared little in common. The dissimilarities in these two poets are in the way they composed their poems and possibly in the content of the poems. Whitman established a unique style in the form of using free verse and Dickinson in her peculiar use of punctuation to establish her unique style of poetry....   [tags: American Poets, Poetic Analysis]

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Walt Whitman's Use of the Theme of Death in His Poetry

- Walt Whitman's Use of the Theme of Death in His Poetry Walt Whitman uses the theme of death in his poetry. Whitman's use of death is unlike any other poets. He draws upon his own experiences with death and this makes his poetry real. Whitman spent time as a wound-dresser during the Civil War. During this time, Whitman learned and saw so much. The death that he saw during this time provided him with inspiration in his poetry and ideas and thoughts about death. Throughout Whitman's poetry, the reader can witness his own feelings of death changing and evolving....   [tags: Papers]

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The Issue That Falls Within Society Understanding Of Education

- ... While this sounds like an accurate view, the problem is that through this notion we are assuming that there is someone out there that knows the answer to everything. In Griffith’s article “How Can I Know Anything?” he addresses this misconception by saying, “For some, to ‘know’ is simply to believe; but for those of us who cannot be doing with the idea of drip-fed revelation, there is the problem of reconciling two seemingly irreconcilable notions. The first notion is that in the broadest sense we cannot know anything....   [tags: Education, Teacher, Walt Whitman, School]

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The Poetry of Walt Whitman versus William Carlos Williams

- The Poetry of Walt Whitman versus William Carlos Williams Perhaps the most basic and essential function of poetry is to evoke a particular response in the reader. The poet, desiring to convey on emotion or inspiration, uses the imagination to create a structure that will properly communicate his state of mind. In essence he is attempting to bring himself and the reader closer, to establish a relationship. William Carlos Williams contends that "art gives the feeling of completion by revealing the oneness of experience" (194) This argument relies on the precept that art is reality is not nature or a reflection of nature but a completely original creation....   [tags: Papers]

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Walt Whitman: Homoeroticism in Leaves of Grass

- Leaves of Grass is Walt Whitman’s life legacy and at the same time the most praised and condemned book of poetry. Although fearful of social scorn, there are several poems in Leaves of Grass that are more explicit in showing the homoerotic imagery, whereas there are several subtle – should I say “implicit” – images woven into the fabric of the book. It is not strange, then, that he created many different identities in order to remain safe. What Whitman faced in writing his poetry was the difficulty in describing and resonating manly and homosexual love....   [tags: Poetry Analysis ]

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Notions of Freedom

- Notions of freedom and captivity abound in the writings of Frederick Douglass and Walt Whitman. As contemporaries both men wrote much on the issue of slavery in the United States, Frederick Douglass’s Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass depicts his quest for freedom from captivity. Walt Whitman celebrates the freedom he sees as inherent in America through his verse. The work of both, however, can be seen to have been captive to political considerations of the period. According to Carl Martin Lindner, “Freedom is central to Whitman’s vision of life – the artistic life, the individual life, and the life of the society.” The notion that freedom is intrinsic to American life is a centra...   [tags: captivity, Whitman, Frederick]

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Whitman and Homosexuality

- Whitman and Homosexuality While responses to Whitman's poetry have always been diverse in some ways, the interpretations of his homosexuality can be divided into three stages. In general terms, Whitman's earliest critics tried to deny Whitman's "deviance"; later critics accepted his homosexuality yet framed it as a marginalized truth; and contemporary critics have exploded in response to these years of oppression, outing Whitman in loud declarations of his intense feelings for men. In 1914, Basil de Selincourt in his work, Walt Whitman: A Critical Study, fights desperately against the homosexual innuendos and imagery in the "Calamus" poems, failing to name directly, in the process, th...   [tags: Papers]

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Analysis Of Allen Ginsberg 's ' Howl '

- Allen Ginsberg’s, “Howl”, was written 100 years later than Walt Whitman’s, “Song of Myself”. These two poems share similarities of speaking on America but in different time eras. Whitman’s poem inspired Ginsberg to write an extension of his poem by remixing it in a more angry and free willed way. By revising the style and the theme of Whitman’s poem, Ginsberg revisits and repurposes it with a strong expression of how much he disagrees with the judgmental American society he’s living in in a very obscene way while also embracing who he really is and not denying it....   [tags: Allen Ginsberg, Walt Whitman, Jack Kerouac]

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Whitman and Neruda as Grassroots Poets

- Whitman and Neruda as Grassroots Poets “The familial bond between the two poets [Walt Whitman and Pablo Neruda] points not only to a much-needed reckoning of the affinity between the two hemispheres, but to a deeper need to establish a basis for an American identity: ‘roots,’ as Neruda referred to his fundamental link with Whitman” (Nolan 33). Both Walt Whitman and Pablo Neruda have been referred to as poets of the people, although it is argued that Neruda with his city and country house, his extensive travels, and his political connections, was never really “one” of the mass....   [tags: Poet Poetry Poem Papers]

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Religion in Walt Whitman's Literature

- Religion in Walt Whitman's Literature "Why should I pray. Why should I venerate and be ceremonious?……I find no sweeter fat than sticks to my own bones." (pg 40)Nature and all of her wondrous facets, especially the human body, was Whitman's religion. Walt Whitman was indeed an intensely spiritual man in his own unconventional way. His epic classic "Song of Myself" demonstrates these attitudes of his, and in his view how the proverbial "poet" of his America should believe. Humanity yearns for spiritual fulfillment and Whitman believed that everything around us and even ourselves were walking testaments to what true ethereal life is....   [tags: Papers]

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Society: The Puppet Master of Freedom

- Throughout history there have been countless cases where groups of people have fought for their freedom. They have fought their battles in political debates, protests, and in the most extreme cases war. The oppressed continuously try to escape their oppressors, under the assumption that their oppressors live in complete sovereignty. People did not know then and still do not understand today that the environment they inhabit is the key factor that controls communal freedom. In Wallace Stevens “Disillusionment of Ten O’ Clock” and Walt Whitman’s “Song of Myself” both speakers affirm that society does not allow individual freedom to exist in this world....   [tags: sociology, poetry, freedom, Whitman, Wallace Steve]

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Comparing the Theme of Nature with Works from Dicknson Whitman and Emerson

- Comparing the Theme of Nature with Works from Dicknson Whitman and Emerson Ralph Waldo Emerson once stated that “the first in time and the first in importance of the influences upon the mind is that of nature.” Nature in all its forms parallels with life, death, and the soul. Whether the sunshines or the rain falls, whether a flower blooms or willows, nature will always recreate itself and remain a mystery to mankind. To become one with nature, one must explore oneself and know that the simplicity found in it is both divine and perfect....   [tags: essays papers]

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Comparing and Contrasting Self-Awareness in the Works of Emerson, Whitman and Poe

- Defining Self-Awareness in the works of Emerson, Whitman and Poe Literature in the American Renaissance influenced the Romantic sentiment that prevailed during this period: the emergence of the individual. This materialization evolved out of the Age of Reason, when the question of using reason (a conscious state) or faith (an unconscious state) as a basis for establishing a set of beliefs divided people into secular and non-secular groups. Reacting to the generally submissive attitudes predominant in America at this time, nineteenth century writers envisioned "the source of religion within consciousness itself" (Chai, 10)....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]

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Self Reliance And Its Impact On Society

- Self-reliance is present in the writers of American literature as one 's own powers and resources rather than those of others in the purpose of feeling love for a nation and be kind as an example for all readers to follow the person and respect for what they should have been. Self-reliance makes more sense when we see in what context the authors write and the serious ideas they wanted to deliver to us. A closer reading of this period of authors allows us to view the value social reform movement and group action more than authors in the early period, so those were perhaps partly due to the maturity one gains in the life cycle, perhaps partly due to the failure of individual philanthropy to s...   [tags: United States, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Walt Whitman]

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Is Self Reliance Right For You?

- Is Self Reliance Right for You. What is most confusing about Ralph Emerson’s Self-Reliance is his overwhelming selfishness. If everyone listened to Emerson’s writing, the world we live in wouldn’t even be possible because no one would work together and everyone would hate each other because they would not need them. The reliance on others is the only way to build a working society, but that does not mean Self-Reliant people are out of the picture in this world. Only certain people fall under the category of Self-Reliant and differ from Emerson’s harsh arguments....   [tags: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass]

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An Analysis of Sing the Body Electric

- A Celebration of Life “I Sing the Body Electric” is one of twelve poems that comprised the 1855 first edition of Walt Whitman’s self-published masterpiece, Leaves of Grass. Like other poems, especially “Song of Myself,” it is a celebration of life. It is hard to believe this classic was written during the Civil War era. A time historically riddled with slavery and injustice, of mass death and discord, as well as the expansion of industrialization, the movement out west and population growth. This 19th century classic defines an age-old problem....   [tags: Walt Whitman's Leaves of Grass]

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Walt Whitm An American Poet

- ... In the early 1870s, Whitman settled in New Jersey, where he had come to visit his dying mother. Shortly after suffering a stroke, he found it impossible to leave New Jersey to go back home. He stayed with his brother until 1882 which is when “Leaves of Grass” was published. This gave him enough money to buy a home in New Jersey. Whitman spent his last years working on revising the new edition of the book in his new home. Whitman died on March 26, 1892. Leaves of Grass was Whitman’s pride and joy, also known as his best piece of work....   [tags: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Walt Whitman]

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Whitmans Democracy

- Whitman's Democracy "I speak the pass-word primeval, I give the sign of democracy, By God. I will Accept nothing which all cannot have their counterpart of on the same terms." This is Whitman's expression of the idea of democracy taken from "Song of Myself." In this all encompassing interpretation Whitman says that the freedom offered by democracy is for all not a chosen few. It included all people, not renouncing those of other races, creeds, or social standings. Examples of this acceptance are scattered through many of the poems Whitman wrote....   [tags: essays research papers]

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