Your search returned 200 essays for "Walt Whitman":
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Walt Whitman's Drum-Taps

- Walt Whitman's Drum-Taps - The Personal Record of Whitman’s Wartime Experiences Walt Whitman is one of America’s most popular and most influential poets. The first edition of Whitman’s well-known Leaves of Grass first appeared in July of the poet’s thirty-sixth year. A subsequent edition of Leaves of Grass (of which there were many) incorporated a collection of Whitman’s poems that had been offered readers in 1865. The sequence added for the 1867 edition was Drum-Taps, which poetically recounts the author’s experiences of the American Civil War....   [tags: Walt Whitman Drum-Taps Essays]

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Walt Whitman's Influence on Germany

- Walt Whitman's Influence on Germany Walt Whitman (1819-1892) is considered to be one of the greatest American poets of the nineteenth century. While Edgar Allan Poe may have been more widely read, Whitman had more international writers actively respond to him and his poetry than any other American poet. A century after his death, writers around the world are still in dialogue with him, pondering the questions he posed, arguing with him and elaborating on his insights. People have been attracted to Whitman for numerous reasons....   [tags: Walt Whitman Germany Poetry Poets Essays]

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Walt Whitman’s Children of Adam

- Walt Whitman’s "Children of Adam" Walt Whitman will forever live in the minds of individuals as one of America’s greatest poets. People in America and all over the world continue to read and treasure his poetry. He was an original thinker, contributing new modern styles to poetry. He was unafraid of controversy and uninhibited by what others may think of him. He created his own path in poetry, as he describes himself in an anonymous review of his poetry: "But there exists no book or fragment of a book which can have given the hint to them" (Whitman)....   [tags: Walt Whitman Children Adam Essays]

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Walt Whitman

- Walt Whitman According to the critics, Walt Whitman is one of America's most inspiring and imaginative poets. Taking ordinary thoughts, Whitman develops ingenious and beautiful stanzas that capture the attention of readers to this day. "Re-examine all that you have been told... dismiss that which insults your soul" (ThinkExist). Taking everyday moments, Whitman provides descriptive, yet intriguing ideas pertaining to the human soul. As many past authors, Whitman's life outside of being a writer was somewhat disruptive at times....   [tags: Poetry]

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walt whitman

- Walt Whitman Walt Whitman, born in 1819 to a family in Long Island, lived a very humble life before becoming a well known writer. He grew up in a community full of Quakers and followed religion very strictly as a child. Whitman loved reading the works of Ralph Waldo Emerson because he thought he related to Emerson’s ideas and theologies which closely corresponded to his own. At the age of 35, Whitman published his first book, Leaves of Grass, which was so successful that it appealed to other known poets worldwide....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Walt Whitman

- Walt Whiteman though himself out to be the poet of American democracy. His poetry described an america where the future had already begun. Whitman believed every individual had as much dignity, and inmportance as anyone else. No job was considered to small or insubordinate. He believed that in order to reach their full potential, people had to break down the barriers that seperated them from others and from parts of their own being. He enciouraged things that made people less embarassed and mroe outgoing....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Walt Whitman

- Mysticism, Democracy, Individuality&Personality The 1881 publication of the Leaves of Grass contained more than twenty-four poems, which were reasonably filled with ten or more diversified types of themes. Walt Whitman the author and compiler of this exceptional work changed the status of poetry writing through his utilization of thought and expression in the publication of the Leaves of Grass. Ralph Waldo Emerson, a collogue and admirer of Walt once spoke this of him '…Whitman, that Sir, is a strange case, a case unknown to any of us, unless we should stumble upon him at church one day…';(Chase 142)....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Walt Whitman

- Walt Whitman Walt Whitman was born in a rural village on Long Island N.Y. on May, 31 1819. He went to school to five to six years, although he received most of his education from the literature he read. His first jobs consisted of being a printer and a school teacher. At the age of 27 he became editor of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, dismissed two years later because he had radically liberal views. In the early 1850’s he went back home to build houses with his father. Emerson believed Whitman wrote for the complete person, one that is willing to listen to one self....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Walt Whitman

- Walt Whitman Walt Whitman lived from 1819 to 1892. He was one of ten children and was born on New York's Long Island. He worked as a printer, teacher and property speculator. In 1855 he published 13 poems in a collection entitled Leaves of Grass. Over the years, Whitman published fresh editions of this collection, the last one in 1892, each time adding many more poems - eventually it would contain hundreds of poems and some 10,500 lines, making Leaves of Grass the length of a good sized novel....   [tags: Papers]

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Walt Whitman's Transition

- Walt Whitman's Transition In any medium of art that is personal to the artist, a change in the artwork can represent a change in the artist. During a period of depression a musician may write heavier, less upbeat music, or a painter may shift to darker tones and more downcast themes. The medium of poetry certainly has the power to reflect the writer's moods and mental state, and the poetry of Walt Whitman's demonstrates this power. A comparison of "Song of Myself," one of Whitman's earlier poems, and "As I Ebb'd With the Ocean of Life," a poem from later in his career, reveals a great change in Whitman from a man of confidence and optimism to one of dissatisfaction and self-doubt....   [tags: Papers]

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The Life and Works of Walt Whitman

- Poets write various styles of poetry. They use their own personal experiences, ideas, and creativity. Walt Whitman used all of these styles in his writings. He had experienced trials and tribulations throughout his whole life. Whitman did a lot of moving during his childhood, and that probably caused his personality to be neurotic. There are a lot of things that he has done to change the writings of future poets’. Walt Whitman was born on May 31, 1819 in Long Island, New York. He was the second son of Walter Whitman and Louisa Van Velsor....   [tags: Biography]

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Comparing Walt Whitman and Ralph Emerson

- Comparing Walt Whitman and Ralph Emerson Walt Whitman is Jay Leno and Ralph Emerson is Ed Hall. Walt takes the instructions announced by Emerson and runs gallantly with them making beautiful and insightful poetry. Walt Whitman and Ralph Emerson spoke out in an age where society was not ready for such dramatic writers. Whitman uses several of Emerson's topics and styles to be that good poet. Whitman elaborates on the characteristics of a poet, freedom, children, and animals. In order to understand any comparison of the two author's one must first read and comprehend that Emerson's writing are clearly an instruction manual that Whitman adopts in order to become an outstanding poet....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]

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Comparing Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson

- Comparing Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson During the time in American history known as the, several poets began to stray from the traditional methods of writing poetry. Among these poets were Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson. While these writer's led drastically different lifestyles and had drastically different styles of writing, the messages they presented through their writing were often surprisingly similar. Whitman's poem "Song of Myself, No.6" and Dickinson's poem "This quiet Dust was Gentlemen and Ladies" are examples of pieces which, on the surface, appear completely different, but in fact contain several similarities....   [tags: Papers]

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On The Beach At Night Alone By Walt Whitman

- In “On the Beach at Night Alone,” Walt Whitman develops the idea that everyone has a connection with everything else, including nature. Whitman uses a variety of writing techniques to get his point across. First, the repetition and parallel structure that his poems contain reinforce the connection between everything in nature. The usage of “All” 11 times emphasizes the inclusion of everything in the universe. The sentence structure remains the same throughout the poem, without any drastic change; however, the length of the lines in the poem vary....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Walt Whitman Vs. Lord Tennyson

- Much like in human society, in nature all animals have two different sides to them. Both of the poems are related in that they talk about a similar subject in the eagle, but they have completely different portrayals and views on how they want the reader to view the eagle. In Lord Alfred Tennyson's poem "The Eagle" we are given the description of an eagle that is dangerous and on the prowl, while in Walt Whitman's "The Dalliance of Eagles" we are given the description of a more amorous and tender side of an eagle....   [tags: Poetry, compare, contrast]

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William Stafford Vs Walt Whitman

- Comparing Two Poets William Stafford's "Traveling Through the Dark" is beautifully written poem that expresses one of life's most challenging aspects. It is the story of a man's solitary struggle to deal with a tragic event that he encounters. Driving down a narrow mountain road, "Traveling Through the Dark," the narrator of the poem encounters a deer. This line might fool the reader into believing the poem has a happy theme; after all, a deer is a beautiful creature that most people associate with nature or freedom....   [tags: Traveling Dark Noiseless Spider Poem Comparison]

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A Comparison of Storm on the Island by Seamus Heaney and Patrolling Barnegat by Walt Whitman

- A Comparison of Storm on the Island by Seamus Heaney and Patrolling Barnegat by Walt Whitman ‘Storm on the Island’ by Seamus Heaney and ‘Patrolling Barnegat’ by Walt Whitman are similar in a number of ways however, there are also strong contrasts. Possibly the most apparent comparison is the subject matter. Both poems are written from a personal viewpoint about a storm. Heaney describes the storm from inside a building for which he is prepared for, “We build our houses squat” The impression is given that the storm according to Heaney is not a rare occurrence and that he is writing about many similar storms....   [tags: Papers]

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Analysis of Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allen Poe, and Walt Whitman's Works

- Analysis of Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allen Poe, and Walt Whitman's Works Out of all the great authors and poets we have studied this semester I have chosen the three that I personally enjoyed reading the most; Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allen Poe, and Walt Whitman. These three Writers stand out above the rest for each has contributed substantially to bringing forth a newly earned respect for American Writers of Literature. Up until this point in time most literature had come from European writers....   [tags: American Writers Literature Authors Essays]

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Comparison between Because I Could Not Stop For Death and Come Up From the Fields Father

- Comparison between Because I Could Not Stop For Death and Come Up From the Fields Father Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman were two of the best poets in America, during the nineteenth century. They were both rebellious each in his own way. The shared some features, especially their abandonment of the usual form of poetry and their use of free verse instead. In comparing the poems “Because I Could Not Stop For Death” by Dickinson and “Come Up From the Fields Father” by Whitman, we can notice some similarities....   [tags: Emily Dickinson Walt Whitman Poetry Essays]

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Whitman

- Very few people will contest that Walt Whitman may be one of the most important and influential writers in American literary history and conceivably the single most influential poet. However many have claimed that Whitman’s writing is so free form as evident in his 1855 Preface to Leaves of Grass and Song of Myself that it has no style. The poetic structures he employs are unconventional but reflect his very democratic ideals towards America. Although Whitman’s writing does not include a structure that can be easily outlined, masterfully his writing conforms itself to no style, other then its own universal and unrestricted technique....   [tags: essays research papers]

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A Defense of Whitman

- A Defense of Whitman            Whether they have loved or loathed his poetry, each writer or critic who has encountered "Leaves of Grass" has had to come to some sort of reckoning with Walt Whitman. The Good Gray Poet, the grandfather of American poetry, has been deified by some and labeled a cultural and artistic barbarian by others. While Whitman freely admitted in his preface to the final publication of "Leaves of Grass" that the work was faulty and far from perfect, some critics see no redeeming qualities in Whitman's art....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]

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Philosophic Thought in Whitman's Song of Myself

-      The Heath Anthology of American Literature repeatedly refers to Walt Whitman and his poetry in terms of being American, yet as I read Song of Myself, my thoughts are continually drawn to the philosophies and religions of the Far East. Like the Tao Te Ching ideas are expressed in enigmatic verse and each stanza is a Zen koan waiting to be meditated on and puzzled out. Even Emerson called Whitman's poetry "a remarkable mixture of the Bhagvat Gita and the New York Herald" ("The Whitman Project")....   [tags: Song of Myself Essays]

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Onomatopoeia and the Doppler Effect in Whitman's To a Locomotive in Winter

- Onomatopoeia and the Doppler Effect in Whitman's To a Locomotive in Winter In his first line of “To a Locomotive in Winter”, Walt Whitman indicates why he created this poem. It is a recitative for a Locomotive in winter. A recitative is a passage rendered in style. Whitman uses the technique of onomatopoeia to create a melodic effect reminiscent of the sound of a passing train. The chugging of the engine, the clatter of the track, and the whistle of the train all create a distinct pulsating rhythm....   [tags: Papers]

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Disparate Objects in Walt Whitman's Leaves of Grass

- Reconciling Disparate Objects in Walt Whitman's Leaves of Grass Walt Whitman begins this excerpt from Leaves of Grass by describing an elusive 'this': "This is the meal pleasantly set . . . . this is the meat and drink for natural hunger." These two clauses that are set next to each other describe 'this' as very different things. "A meal pleasantly set," evokes a quiet table in a genteel household. In contrast, "the meat and drink for natural hunger," recalls a more rugged table at which the food will be consumed after strenuous activity....   [tags: Walt Whitman Leaves of Grass]

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Walt Whitman

- Walt Whitman Walt Whitman was born on May 31, 1819, in West Hills, Long Island, New York. He was the second of six children. From 1825-1830, he attended public school in Brooklyn. After his years of education, Walt Whitman experimented with many different jobs. From 1836-1838, Whitman taught at several schools in Long Island. After teaching, Walt Whitman returned to printing and editing in New York. During this time he edited many papers such as the Aurora (daily newspaper), Evening Tattler, Brooklyn Weekly Freeman, Brooklyn Daily Eagle and the Brooklyn Times....   [tags: Papers]

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"Crossing Brooklyn Ferry" by Walt Whitman

- "Crossing Brooklyn Ferry" by Walt Whitman Recurring Images and Motifs in "Crossing Brooklyn Ferry" In the poem "Crossing Brooklyn Ferry" by Walt Whitman, there are many recurring images and motifs that can be seen. Whitman develops these images throughout the course of the poem. The most dominant of these are the linear notion of time, playing roles, and nature. By examining these motifs and tracing their development, ones understanding of the poem becomes highly deepened. Whitman challenges the linear notion of time by connecting past with future....   [tags: Poem Poet Whitman Brooklyn Ferry Essays]

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Walt Whitman

- During the time period that Walter Whitman lived, there were many controversial things happening to the American people as a whole. One of the most strenuous upon society at the time was the Civil War. The Civil War created many problems in the lives of most Americans during this time period. This war also prompted, and inspired Walt to create many of his historical works of art. The war was raging in both the north and the south during Whitman's golden era of his writing. In the North, the economy was blooming, and growing, and industry was getting better and better each day....   [tags: essays research papers]

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Biography of Walt Whitman

- Thesis I. Walt Whitman is an American poet, journalist, and essayist whose Versace collection Leaves of Grass is a landmark in the history of American literature. Introduction II. He was born to a family that settled in North America in the first half of the 17th century. Also his family had owned a large tract of land. Therefore his family didn’t have it all they were not poor either. They were an average family. Body Walt Whitman was born on May 31, 1819 in West Hills Long Island N.Y... In 1823 they moved to Brooklyn....   [tags: poet, journalist, work, literature]

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The American Soldier and Walt Whitman

- F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel The Great Gatsby sings the dirge of the illusions of the New World. The narrator Nick Carraway migrates from the American Midwest to New York to create a new life for himself; a life of prosperity, of happiness, and of independence. In other words, he moves to attain the American Dream. However, after observing the recklessness, the superficiality, the materialism, and the vice of those already living in New York, Nick realizes that the dream had been twisted into an ugly form....   [tags: Poetry, War, Poems]

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Walt Whitman and Hanshan

- Poems by Walt Whitman and Hanshan feature strong enlightenment ideals and prevalent references to nature as a way to achieve these ideals. Though the two men lived in very different times, their works carry similar messages. Following the path to enlightenment generally refers to the Buddhist Eightfold Path, though it has been adapted over time to refer to the state of understanding a person reaches, both of oneself and his or her surroundings, as well as of that beyond what can be sensed. Relying solely on one’s talents and denying society and worldly possessions are typically seen as characteristics of an enlightened person, as seen in the writings of both Whitman and Hanshan....   [tags: enlightment ideals poetry]

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Walt Whitman's Life and Career Path

- Born on May 31, 1819 in West Hills, Long Island, New York; Walter Whitman is considered one of the most influential poets in America. He is the second child of Walter and Louisa Whitman’s eight children. Walter was given the nickname Walt to distinguish him from his father. Walter started his life well off but had to sell his farmland; leaving the family struggling to regain some of their previous wealth. Walt often describes his childhood as nomadic and unhappy since he was being moved around for work opportunities for his father....   [tags: poet, published, imagery]

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Comparing Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson

- Comparing Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson The lives of Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson have many similarities and differences. Here, we will focus on the similarities in their lives in order to bring to attention a correlation between Whitman's poem I Saw in Louisiana a Live-oak Growing and Dickinson's poem # 1510. Both poets wrote during the time of Romanticism, even though Whitman was Dickinson's senior by some eleven years. This however did not influence the way the writing styles of many of their poems coincided....   [tags: Papers]

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Walt Whitman's Use of the Theme of Death in His Poetry

- Walt Whitman's Use of the Theme of Death in His Poetry Walt Whitman uses the theme of death in his poetry. Whitman's use of death is unlike any other poets. He draws upon his own experiences with death and this makes his poetry real. Whitman spent time as a wound-dresser during the Civil War. During this time, Whitman learned and saw so much. The death that he saw during this time provided him with inspiration in his poetry and ideas and thoughts about death. Throughout Whitman's poetry, the reader can witness his own feelings of death changing and evolving....   [tags: Papers]

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Walt Whitman’s Sensual Language in Leaves of Grass

- Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass covers many facets of human love, including love of the physical body. Whitman’s book contains many poems that try to embrace the beauty of the human body instead of covering it up. Whitman describes the human form in close detail throughout Leaves of Grass, but one of his poems in particular is especially vivid in detail. In “Children of Adam”, the fourth book of Leaves of Grass, Whitman gives readers a celebratory look at the human form. “I Sing the Body Electric” is one poem in particular that demonstrates how Whitman celebrates the human body through descriptive language of love and the human form and by elevating the human form to something more than a sim...   [tags: poems, human body]

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Walt Whitman Proves that Greatness Comes in Many Ways, Shapes, and Forms

- ... Whitman was born on May 31, 1819 in West Hills, Long Island; to a working class family. He was the second of nine children. In his very young years of his life he grew up in New York. At that time it was still developing into a big city. Whitman had many jobs, he worked as a journalist, a teacher, a government clerk, and on the side in addition to publishing his poetry he was a volunteer nurse during the American Civil War. Later on in Whitman’s life he moved back to New York and became an editor....   [tags: poet, self-taught, literary hero]

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The Powerful Use of Imagery and Metaphor in a Noiseless Patient Spider by Walt Whitman

- The heart of poetry is in its imagery, which leads the reader to perceive all of the senses the poet was feeling – the sights, sounds, scents, touches. A poet uses imagery to evoke these emotions in the reader to paint a mental picture – to “show” the reader the experience that inspired the poet, not just “tell” the story. In “A Noiseless Patient Spider,” Walt Whitman’s use of metaphor and powerful imagery emphasizes the speaker’s own search for soulful connectedness to the world. As written in the second stanza at line six “And you, O my soul where you stand, / Surrounded, detached, in measureless oceans of space, /Ceaselessly musing, venturing, throwing, seeking the spheres to connect...   [tags: imagery, senses, metaphor]

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Death and Regeneration in Walt Whitman's Poem, When Lilacs Last In The Dooryard Bloom'd

- Death and Regeneration in Walt Whitman's Poem, When Lilacs Last In The Dooryard Bloom'd Whitman in 1865 wrote an elegy for President Lincoln entitled "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd." The "Lilacs" elegy is an outpouring of the deep sense of loss that Whitman felt after the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. The President's death was a great shock to the poet; it overwhelmed him in a very personal way. Whitman recognized Lincoln's excellence and importance. When Whitman first heard of the assassination, it was the spring of the year and the lilacs were in bloom....   [tags: When Lilacs Last Essays]

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Abraham Lincoln's War Aims Compared to William Sherman and Walt Whitman

- Within a short amount of time after the election of Abraham Lincoln to the office of presidency, the south had seceded from the Union and brought on the beginning of the American Civil War. In 1863, the third year of the war, Lincoln had given a speech of the sacred battle ground at Gettysburg, most notably called the Gettysburg Address. In it, he expressed sincerity for those who fought and died there and most of all, proclaimed his aims of war itself. Walt Whitman, a celebrated poet of the time, traveled from hospital to hospital witnessing the operations of wounded soldiers and also the horrific scenes of death and amputation....   [tags: American History]

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Poem Analysis: O Captain! My Captain! by Walt Whitman

- ... But as the crowd cheering, he remains on deck, bewailing the death of his admirable captain. O Captain. My Captain. is Whitman’s tribute to Abraham Lincoln. The whole poem is an allegory of Lincoln’s death. Lincoln is the “captain” and the “fearful trip” is the (American) Civil War. The captain is “fallen cold and dead” refers to the fact that Abraham Lincoln was assassinated shortly after the Civil Wars. “The ship” is the United States and “the prize” is the preservation of the Union. One of the figurative languages used in O Captain....   [tags: allegory, abraham lincoln, union]

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Analysis of The Man He Killed, Reconciliation, and Dreamers

- Analysis of The Man He Killed, Reconciliation, and Dreamers In the chosen poems, Thomas Hardy, Walt Whitman, and Sigfried Sassoon each have a common viewpoint: war brings out the worst in man, a feeling buried deep inside the heart. Even with this clotting of the mind due to the twisting ways of war, a flicker of remorse, a dream of someplace, something else still exists within the rational thought. These poems express hope, the hope that war will not be necessary. They show that man only kills because he must, not because of some inbred passion for death....   [tags: Thomas Hardy War Walt Whitman Sassoon Essays]

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Dickinson vs Whitman

- Dickinson vs Whitman Two Poets, Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson are probably two of the most influential people in American poetry. They are regarded as the founders modern American poetry. Walt Whitman (1819-1892), for the time was breaking new ground with his diverse, energetic verse with regards to subject matter, form and style whether talking about overlooked objects in nature such as a single blade of grass or even our own hearing. Emily Dickinson (1830-1886) while living a life of seclusion, never really leaving her birthplace, was very adventurous internally....   [tags: essays papers]

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Walter Whitman Research Paper Outline Draft

- ... Paragraph 2: At the age twelve he begin to learn how to do printing trade in New York City. He was taught in country part of New York on Long Island. Graduated from a high school in Long Island and become a journalist. Whitman really did not have a childhood he had to work and school to support the family. Paragraph 3: At the age twenty-three everyday he edited a daily newspaper in New York; in 1846 he became editor of Brooklyn Daily Eagle. At the same time he was a teacher and printer and doing the journals for the morning newspaper....   [tags: brief biography, transcendentalism, realism]

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Whitman’s Use of Extended Metaphor in O Captain! My Captain!

- ... “Where on the deck my Captain lies fallen cold and dead” (7-8). This is a comparison a ships captain and President lincoln being killed. On April 14,1865 president Lincoln was watching a show at Ford’s theatre in Washington D.C. with his wife. During the middle of the show John Wilkes Booth snuck up to Lincolns seat and shot him in the back of the head from point blank range. Booth then jumped off of the balcony and onto the stage screaming “The south is avenged.” President lincoln died in a coma nine hours later....   [tags: lincoln, union, civil war]

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Divergence into Tradition: Whitman’s Successful Conventionality in “O Captain! My Captain!”

- Divergence into Tradition: Whitman’s Successful Conventionality in “O Captain. My Captain!” President Abraham Lincoln’s assassination served as the tragic closing to the American Civil War. Walt Whitman, who idolized Lincoln because he felt that they shared the common goal of uniting the nation, wrote one of his most famous poems, “O Captain. My Captain!” as a lament, portraying the horror he felt after hearing of the loved president’s death. When compared to almost all of Whitman’s other poems, “O Captain....   [tags: Poem, Metaphor, Civil War]

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Ralph Emerson And Walt Whitman

- Ralph Waldo Emerson and Walt Whitman are two of the most iconic American poets of the 19th century. Emerson and Whitman were both revolutionaries in American poetry, in their own time and their own right. When Emerson released his piece “The Poet,” a writing that challenged all of the American poets to become, as he put it, the next “Great American Poet,” which would address all of “the facts of the animal economy, sex, nutriment, gestation, birth.” Of all the poets that read Emerson’s piece, Whitman was the one who decided to “put the living, breathing, sexual body at the center of much of his poetry, challenging conventions of the day” (“Walt Whitman”, The Norton Anthology of American Lit...   [tags: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Walt Whitman]

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Walt Whitman's Relation to the Romantic Period

- The time of Romanticism brought upon many trends extending from the idea of individualism as a rebellious separation from the classics, an idealistic outlook and finally to a strong religious base. Most of the writers of the Romantic period followed Pantheism "God is everything and everything is God ... the world is either identical with God or in some way a self-expression of his nature" (Owen 1971: 74). The idea of Pantheism was that everything in the world worked in unity. In some of the works of the Romantic period the expression of nature and humans are not separate entities, but one in the same....   [tags: Romanticism and Walt Whitman]

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Walt Whitman And The New York

- May 31, 1819, Walt Whitman was born to Walter Whitman and Louisa Van Velsor. Walt was the second son of nine children who lived in New York in the 1820’s and 1830’s. Between 1825 and 1830 Walt attended public school in Brooklyn while his family moved often within the city. At twelve Walt began to learn the trade of printing to then begin loving the written word. Whitman worked as a printer until the age of seventeen when a fire destroyed where he worked. In 1836 he began working as a school teacher in Long Island until 1841 when he became a full-time journalist....   [tags: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Walt Whitman, United States]

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Song Of Myself By Walt Whitman

- “Song of Myself” by Walt Whitman is a great American poem that reflects the nation’s ideals such as freedom, equality, and unity. These ideas were much needed at the time of its first publication in 1855, ten years before the American Civil War. The poem was published again 1n 1891 just before the poet’s death. “Song of Myself” should serve as an American epic because of its representation of American tradition, culture, and ideals. It also strives to include all of the country’s extremely diverse population, which is a difficult task....   [tags: United States, Walt Whitman, American Civil War]

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Analysis Of Walt Whitman And Emily Dickinson

- The poems by Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson are known to be the cornerstones of American poetry in the way that they view the aspect of life and death. The writers themselves could not have been more different in their poems about these subjects. Walt Whitman has been called by several to be the grandfather of modern day poetry. In his poems he expresses the journey that is to live and to die. Whitman also shows through his work the importance of staying outside of social norms while also expressing yourself in any way that one might see fit....   [tags: Death, Poetry, Walt Whitman, Life]

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Summary Of ' Leaves Of Grass ' By Walt Whitman

- America during the late 1700’s and early 1800’s appeared to seemingly be a very controversial time. The experiences that American’s went through during this era heavily impacted the way they thought, wrote, and handled day-to-day life. For the poet, Walt Whitman, he was influenced to publish, “a volume containing twelve untitled poems along with an exuberant preface declaring his ambition to be the American bard” (Levine 1312). In his book, “Leaves of Grass,” Whitman’s preface gives truthful insight into the American life and culture, and recognizes that America symbolizes freedom for all and that we are equal....   [tags: Walt Whitman, United States, Ralph Waldo Emerson]

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Analysis Of ' Leaves Of Grass ' By Walt Whitman

- American poet, Walt Whitman explores the connection between the concept of the nation and the poet as a means of further establishing the national identity of the United States of America. The preface to his collection of poetry, entitled Leaves of Grass, first published in 1855 merely 79 years after the United States was founded acts as a reinforcement of nationalist sensibilities that work to define what the American is on a internal and international scale. Within this text Whitman creates an inventory of the attributes that are defining of the poet as an individual, emphasizing the positive qualities as being linked to their vocation....   [tags: United States, Walt Whitman, Ralph Waldo Emerson]

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Analysis Of Walt Whitman 's ' Song Of Myself '

- “Song of Myself” Analysis Contrary to most poets during the nineteenth century, Whitman’s writings do not conform to the conventions of society. His works are written for all walks of life to read in a very accessible manner. In the excerpts from “Song of Myself”, Walt Whitman suggests that he is equivalent in magnitude to the entire American population through shifting points of view to empathize with others and universalizing the grass through an extended metaphor. Whitman creates a sense of democracy where everyone is equal to each other by relating to diverse perspectives and demographics....   [tags: Walt Whitman, United States, Poetry]

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Walt Whitman 's I Hear America Singing

- In "I, Too," Langston Hughes is obviously in conversation with the earlier poem, Walt Whitman 's "I Hear America Singing." Both poems explore the idea of American identity -- who and what is an American. What characterizes the people of this nation. The two poets, however, reach somewhat different conclusions in response to these questions. In "I Hear America Singing," Whitman refers to "the varied carols" of different workers "mechanics", "the carpenter", " the mason", "the boatman" and "the deck man", "the shoemaker" and "the hatter”....   [tags: Walt Whitman, United States, Poetry]

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Crossing Brooklyn Ferry by Walt Whitman

- Through the use of simple diction, Whitman is able to traverse both time and distance and connect with his readers as so few other poets can. His mastery of verbiage draws readers into the poem, as few other poets can. In “Crossing Brooklyn Ferry,” Whitman creates a vignette into the Brooklyn of the past, and he connects it to the present, though in surprising ways. The omnipresence of Whitman allows the reader to envision themselves into the settings he created- and to interpret them into modern language....   [tags: Crossing Brooklyn Ferry, Walt Whitman ]

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Analysis Of Walt Whitman 's Poem ' Song Of Myself

- Walt Whitman’s Religious Vision Embedded at the Heart of Leaves of Grass as seen through the poem, Song of Myself The poetry in Whitman’s Leaves of Grass is specifically forceful. It was written at a time when Walt Whitman’s personal religious perspective was that he himself was a prophet as stated in his first poem “Song of Myself.” This poem appears in Whitman’s first book Leaves of Grass. Whitman says: “Divine am I and out, and I make holy water whatever I touch or am touched from; / The scent of these armpits is aroma finer than prayer; /This head is more than churches or bibles or creeds” (39).The poet’s deistic belief taught him with an appreciation and affection for this perspective...   [tags: Religion, Faith, Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass]

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Analysis Of Walt Whitman 's Movement Of Poetry

- In the mid to late eighteenth century, poetry started to change. Everything about it was beginning to change. At this time, poetry was not focused on the as many of the things that it is today. The ideas of sex and more risque feelings were not described or even mention in these poems. At this time poetry was still traditional, but there was one man who set out to chance that. Walt Whitman spearheaded the movement of poetry from a traditional viewpoint to a viewpoint where the reader would be able to get a deeper personal connection with the author, rather than just reading about love....   [tags: Walt Whitman, Poetry, Free verse, Abolitionism]

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Walt Whitman 's Views On Women And Industry

- Walt Whitman had many ideas of how America was not living up to what the founding fathers had hoped to have achieved in their democracy a century before in succeeding from England.  Whitman thought that the government was beginning to resemble what the founding fathers had fought and multitudes of soldiers died to escape from. In contrast to what the government had been returning to, Americans as a whole were finding their identity as a very young nation and were proud to call themselves Americans....   [tags: United States, Walt Whitman, 19th century]

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Analysis Of Walt Whitman 's Song Of Myself

- One of the most popular American poets is Walt Whitman. Whitman’s poetry has become a rallying cry for Americans, asking for individuality, self-approval, and even equality. While this poetry seems to be truly groundbreaking, which it objectively was, Whitman was influenced by the writings of others. While Whitman may not have believed in this connection to previous authors, critics have linked him to Emerson, Poe, and even Carlyle. However, many critics have ignored the connection between Walt Whitman and the English writer William Wordsworth....   [tags: Walt Whitman, Poetry, Romanticism, Romantic poetry]

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Analysis Of Walt Whitman 's ' Song Of Myself

- Walt Whitman is considered the foremost poet of American democracy of his time. Not only did he fully embrace it, but he believed that American democracy was more than a political system, but a way of life (Casale 48). Many of his personal experiences influenced his deep democratic point of view (48). As a volunteer at an army hospital during the American Civil War, he saw many die and became increasingly grateful for the opportunities provided by the American government (Mirsky). Later, as he was residing in New York City, Whitman witnessed America face urbanization....   [tags: Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass, Song of Myself]

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Analysis Of Walt Whitman 's Leaves Of Grass And Song Of Myself

- Before Walt Whitman was ever a writer, he was a teacher. He was a teacher who was highly admired by his students. He tended to use methods that were nontraditional, and therefore were typically frowned upon by parents and other adults. However, this did not stop Whitman from expressing himself, and allowing Others to do the same, through his teaching. Whitman’s pedagogy as demonstrated in Leaves of Grass and Song of Myself, though seen as radical in his own time, is one that can be learned from and admired in today 's society....   [tags: Education, Teacher, Teaching, Walt Whitman]

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Analysis Of Walt Whitman 's ' Of Grass And Don Delillo 's White Noise '

- Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass and Don DeLillo’s White Noise were written over a century apart. In that time there was a significant change in the mentality between what it was to be an American and how much of a person’s identity was a part of their nationality. Over time, the American people have created a more negative outlook on society. While Whitman remains more positive and proud of being an American, DeLillo has adapted a more cynical perspective. There are several poems from Walt Whitman’s collection of Leaves of Grass that portray his particular belief in the American identity....   [tags: United States, Walt Whitman, Don DeLillo]

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Walt Whitman 's Poem From Song Of Myself And When I Heard The Learn 'd Astronomer

- Walt Whitman’s Understanding of Himself and his Philosophy About Life in “from Song of Myself” and “When I Heard the Learn’d Astronomer” The poems “from Song of Myself” and “When I Heard the Learn’d Astronomer” written by Walt Whitman demonstrate the poet’s understanding of himself and his philosophy regarding life. Through these poems, Whitman is able to express his beliefs and values. When he was a young man, Whitman became involved with the Democratic Party. In both of these poems, we are able to distinguish his strong association to this....   [tags: Walt Whitman, Poetry, Leaves of Grass]

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Walt Whitman's Writings

- 1. "Apart from the pulling and hauling stands what I am, stands amused, complacent, compassionating, idle, unitary… (Whitman 38) ." This line expresses Walt Whitman's philosophy on life and is an almost perfect description of the poet. He was a man, who in his poetry, expressed independence, interdependence with other living things, and the struggles that are dealt with by him and others in order to gain that independence. He felt and wrote that it is important to stand up for the things in which one believes in....   [tags: Papers]

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Walt Whitman and the Civil War

- Walt Whitman is a famous poet in American history and the founder of free style of writing poem. He was well-known with his work of Leaves of Grass and Drum-Taps. Walt Whitman was inspired to write poems about Civil War and changed his style of writing after experiencing the horrible result of the war. Walt Whitman was born in West Hills, Long Island, on May 31, 1819. He is the second son of eight siblings in the family. In his early life, Whitman received a formal education until age of 11 because he needed to help his father to support the big family....   [tags: american history, poet, drum-taps]

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Walt Whitman's Song of Myself

- In one of the sections from the poem, “Song of Myself” Walt Whitman starts out with a child asking a question, “What is the grass?” Grass is a symbol of life. God, who created both the heavens and the earth also gave birth to life. When Whitman refers to grass as a “handkerchief of the Lord” (7), as a gift. When people look at the grass, they do not think of it as a creation but rather just a plant. Whitman refers to the grass as “a child, the produced babe of vegetation” (11, 12). Here, the grass is a metaphor for the birth of a child....   [tags: Song of Myself Essays]

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Walt Whitman and Drumtaps

- Walt Whitman and Drumtaps War is hell; there is no other way to put it. No matter how many times bards romanticize war and battle, there is that ultimate, inherent ugliness involved in the business of killing. There is no honor or heroism in dying for your country, you just die, it is a great tragedy and there is nothing you can do about it. Mortality is always present on both sides fighting the battle; there will continuously be casualties. Suffering, misery and destitution are constant whether on the march, sitting in the trench or charging across no man's land....   [tags: Papers]

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The Lincoln Assasination's Impact on Walt Whitman

- The Lincoln Assasination's Impact on Walt Whitman On the night of the awful tragedy an unreal action occurred in the box at the theater. Watching was the greatest man of his time in the glory of the most stupendous success story in our history. He was the idolized chief of a nation already mighty, and a symbol to all of the grandeur of a great nation. Quick death was to come on the central figure of that company -- the central figure of the great and good men of the century. The shot heard around the country would not die in a whimper....   [tags: Papers]

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Egalitarianism in The Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman

- Within Walt Whitman’s works he expresses his egalitarianism or belief in the equality of all people, especially in political, social, or economic life in his epic book called the leaves of grass. His strong point of view in the poem I Sing the Body Electric is expressed through sexuality, body attributes, political views. In the poem of I sing the body electric Walt Whitman expresses many qualities upon the body. It is as if he almost prizes them upon the glory that each attribute of a human being takes....   [tags: body electric, poem, man, women]

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Love By William Shakespeare, By Walt Whitman

- There had been many muses to the world of poetry, may it be a person or even a perception on life. Love is one that prevails all in the musings and perhaps there is a reason for that. While there are some that are cynical in the way of love and how it affects a person, love can have many positive effects on the mood and behavior of an enamored individual.With works from well known poets such as Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, and even the bard himself, William Shakespeare, the subject of love jumps up from the pages as changing an individual....   [tags: Romeo and Juliet, Sonnet, William Shakespeare]

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An Analysis of Walt Whitman's Song of Myself

- An Analysis of Walt Whitman's Song of Myself `Whitman was always asking questions. He believed that life's goal or cause was a mystery. He was surrounded by people who were drawing distinct lines between right and wrong, rejecting the things in the universe that were not a direct ticket to holiness. Whitman, unlike his contemporaries, embraced the beauty of everything. His mystical perception of the world ushered in the idea that God was to be found in every thing, and that He could never be fully understood....   [tags: Song of Myself Essays]

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Walt Whitm An American Poet

- Walt Whitman was born on May 31, 1819 in the state of New York. He was the second child of Walter Whitman and Louisa Van Velsor. Walt grew up in a large family which consisted of 9 children. They lived in Brooklyn and Long Island for about twenty years. Self-taught and self-made, Whitman was an American poet who can be considered as one of the greatest poets to ever take ink to paper At only twelve years old, Whitman began to understand the basics of reading and writing and became passionate with the subjects....   [tags: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Walt Whitman]

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Walter Whitman 's Leaves Of Grass

- Nationality in Walter Whitman’s Leaves of Grass The glamorization of American opportunity created a great sense of nationalism which encouraged many to embrace ideas like manifest destiny. Walt Whitman was a poet living in the nineteenth century who wrote many poems which figuratively painted a picture portraying enrichment and opportunity in America, and the greater opportunity which could be achieved through traveling west. One compilation of poems entitled Leaves of Grass, was quite influential to those living in America and abroad, catching the eye of many opportunists seeking a better future for themselves....   [tags: Walt Whitman, United States, Nationalism]

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Critique Of Whitman 's Pedagogy

- Critique of Whitman’s Pedagogy (A critique of Walt Whitman’s themes and ideas in Song of Myself 6, 46, 47) Pedagogy is a teaching style that is used to help students learn. Teachers often have a unique pedagogy that they prefer to follow. Some teachers prefer to lecture, others model, some simply assign the work, and to each their own. “…there is some evidence of teachers abandoning formal pedagogies in favor of informal ones…” (Cain). Walt Whitman was no different; he preferred a hands on approach when it came to teaching, and through his approach, he learned as much from the student as they did from him....   [tags: Teacher, Education, Walt Whitman, Song of Myself]

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Walt Whitman: A Strong Minded and Anxious American Author

- ... Walt had an older brother, but he was in the army, so they couldn’t talk as much. He attended a public school in Brooklyn, with that being said, he didn’t have time to let anyone break his focus. Walt’s guardians often took him to see plays by William Shakespeare, because he always talked about being an editor or poet. William Shakespeare was a great influence on Walt, he learned that it took patience, respect, integrity, and being out and away from home very often. Whitman took in everything that he learned except the fact that he didn’t get away from the house a lot, he just stayed and wrote about his life, his parents, and the world he grew up in....   [tags: influential writers]

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`` Oh Captain My Captain `` By Walt Whitman

- Oh Captain In the poem “Oh Captain, my captain” was written by Walt Whitman. This poem was written in 1865 during the civil war and President Lincoln. Whitman admired Lincoln and would gave aid to the wounded soldiers. The writer is referring the war to a ship and is using nautical terms to describe the death of the president. Walt Whitman wrote four poems on the death of Abraham Lincoln. One of the four was “Oh captain, my captain” (Vendler 2). This poem is formally rhymed poem. In the first stanza Whitman is referring “O captain, my captain our fearful trip is done”, (Whitman 1) saying that the captain is Abraham Lincoln....   [tags: United States, Abraham Lincoln]

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Nature and Death in Walt Whitman's Song of Myself

- There are many "popular" topics used frequently by authors. Love, religion, and war are some favorites. Two other such topics we typically read about are nature and death. The two can be discussed separately or they can be related to each other. Walt Whitman, a lover of nature, tackled these subjects in "Song of Myself" from Leaves of Grass. Another author who does the same is William Cullen Bryant. Though two very different writers with different styles, they share some of the same ideas. "Song of Myself" is a celebration of life and God....   [tags: Song of Myself Essays]

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Defining the Soul in Walt Whitman's Song of Myself

- Every sentence in Walt Whitman's "Song of Myself" tends to either repeat or contradict. He even says of himself, "I contradict myself" (Lauter, p. 2793). This can make Whitman's poetry a little confusing to some. In his many stanzas, definition of the soul is ambiguous and somewhat contradictory. Whitman says, "Clear and sweet is my soul....and clear and sweet is all that is not my soul" (Lauter, p. 2745). What I believe Whitman is saying here is that his soul and everything else that is not his soul, including the souls of others, is clear and sweet....   [tags: Song of Myself Essays]

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Emotions in O Captain! My Captain!" by Walt Whitman

- The poem, "O Captain. My Captain!" by Walt Whitman re-imagines the assassination of Abraham Lincoln by using emotions filled with shock and regret of losing a father figure. Walt Whitman has a patriotic attitude towards this poem as he describes Abraham Lincoln and all that he did for America by using imagery to develop a scene similar to the reality. The poet conveys his deep admiration for the achievements of Abraham Lincoln. Whitman shares his form by using a physical way of laying out and his attitude through the use of sound devices such as the iambic meter and the use of amphibrach....   [tags: abraham lincoln assassination, patriotic attitude]

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The Cycle of Life in Walt Whitman's Song of Myself

- The Cycle of Life in Walt Whitman's Song of Myself In stanza six of the poem "Song of Myself", by Walt Whitman, he poses the question "What is the grass?" I believe that grass is a metaphor for the cycle of life. Throughout the poem Whitman points out images that grass could represent. All of these images stem from the life and death that we come to expect in our lifetime. During your life you will experience death, it at times surrounds you, but if you look past the grief and look to the beauty you will see that it is a cycle that keeps our world in balance....   [tags: Song of Myself Essays]

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Identities and Transcendentalism in Song of Myself by Walt Whitman

- Identities and Transcendentalism in Song of Myself While reading through the poem Song of Myself by Walt Whitman, what comes to your mind. His deep love for nature. The use of symbolism throughout the poem. Whitman’s questionable homoeroticism that seeps its way throughout the lines. What came to the forefront of mind when reading this poem by Whitman was his deliberately obvious theme of individuality while also maintaining a universal identity. I also think that Whitman throws in a common underlying theme of transcendentalism throughout his poem....   [tags: Individuality, Poem]

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